Favourite Manuals

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Favourite Manuals

Postby the_last_alive » 26 Jul 2006 12:39

What are peoples favourite manuals that are available online?
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Postby admin » 26 Jul 2006 12:54

Guess ;):lol:
http://www.antique-swords.co.uk/

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Postby admin » 26 Jul 2006 12:56

Aside from the obvious, I really love the pictures of Talhoffer's 1459 on the Danish Library website. And Das Solothurner at the ARMA is very nice to look at. And I have a special fondness for the Gladiatoria codex (also on the ARMA site).
For later treatises I love the art of Domenico Angelo's smallsword treatise, which can be found in our gallery:
http://test.fioredeiliberi.org/gallery2 ... temId=7901
http://www.antique-swords.co.uk/

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Postby the_last_alive » 26 Jul 2006 13:11

Links?

Especially the Talhoffer
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Postby Szabolcs Waldmann » 26 Jul 2006 13:53

Here's the Talhoffer 1459:

http://flaez.ch/talhoffer/

My favourite is of course the Getty from Fiore and hanko Döbringer. Those two are as far as I know the very first available in both schools - german and italian - and those two have one thing in common: you get to know the person, his feelings, and yes, a bit of the world they lived in. It's not just dry technical stuff... There are even some phylosophies in the book. And I should mention my personal favourite of the later times, Paulus Hector Mair. I've seen two of his books live, and they are awesome, amazing, wonderful. I like Mair's story, and wish to understand more of his motivs and his world. I mean, I am in the middle of a translation to hungarian and I like the guy, he's great.

I plan to do a seminar in Dijon next year of my research.

byez

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Postby the_last_alive » 26 Jul 2006 14:32

Szabolcs Waldmann wrote:My favourite is of course the Getty from Fiore and hanko Döbringer. Those two are as far as I know the very first available in both schools - german and italian


Doesn't I.33 pre-date Doebringer?
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Postby Harry » 26 Jul 2006 14:46

my own ringeck translation, the codex wallerstein, fabian von auerwald and the jeu de la hache
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Postby admin » 26 Jul 2006 15:31

the_last_alive wrote:Doesn't I.33 pre-date Doebringer?


Quite right, but I think what Szab meant was that Doebringer is the earliest in the Liechtenauer lineage, whereas I.33 seems to part of a pan-European sword and buckler lineage.

I prefer to refer to Liechtenauer lineage or Fiore lineage rather than German and Italian - firstly because lots of other separate lineages existed in both regions and secondly because Germany and Italy didn't exist as countries then ;).
http://www.antique-swords.co.uk/

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Postby admin » 26 Jul 2006 15:32

p.s. Apart from Fiore's 3 texts by next favourite source to read is perhaps Doebringer - the translation by David Lindholm.
http://www.antique-swords.co.uk/

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Postby Paul » 26 Jul 2006 15:38

admin wrote:because Germany and Italy didn't exist as countries then ;).
You could even argue that the "Italian" lineage is in fact German. :wink:
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Postby admin » 26 Jul 2006 15:46

You could but you'd be ignoring half the facts :).
http://www.antique-swords.co.uk/

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Postby Jeff Gentry » 26 Jul 2006 15:46

I realy like the Lindholm translation of Doebringer and the Meyer book is very interesting also.

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Postby the_last_alive » 26 Jul 2006 15:47

admin wrote:
the_last_alive wrote:Doesn't I.33 pre-date Doebringer?


Quite right, but I think what Szab meant was that Doebringer is the earliest in the Liechtenauer lineage, whereas I.33 seems to part of a pan-European sword and buckler lineage.


Fair enough, i wasn't sure.
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Postby Matclarke » 26 Jul 2006 15:57

3227a wins me over with this line.

"You little fool who wanted to be the best,
see what happened."
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Postby Szabolcs Waldmann » 27 Jul 2006 06:06

As for 3227, we bought the entire document as microfilm, and are about to transcrypt all the missing parts - yes, even the recepies for funny candies. ;)

I am not sure if yet more knowledge in longsword will emerge, but you have to make sure about that, no?
So my point is, if anybody is interested - just like i said in dijon - in a group project of a hanko transcription / translation, just join in. I mean, the translation will of course be free available through ours and hemac's website, but an english translation has still to be done.


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Postby Carlo » 30 Jul 2006 00:51

After some ponderation, I have to say that I find most of the cool stuff i'm interested into in Marozzo. However, he nevere takes a simple path to anything :shock: and it takes *some work* to follow his ideas. Di Grassi is good but he's absolutely tied to his principles, Manciolino sometimes is semplicistic. Silver is good but lacking illustrations.

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Postby The Salmon Lord » 04 Aug 2006 12:52

Cold Steel.

Because as a manual it is very effective in that it is clear, readily understood, concise, well illustrated and has a chap with a very fine set of whiskers.

Not however appreciated by the Whitechapel Toughs.
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