Is there a good Fiore dei Liberi book?

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Is there a good Fiore dei Liberi book?

Postby Lidsman » 28 Dec 2016 09:57

I have both Lindholms and Schmidts books about the Lichtenauer-tradition and I wonder if there is any books of that sort about Fiore?
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Re: Is there a good Fiore dei Liberi book?

Postby the_last_alive » 28 Dec 2016 10:29

Bob Charettes Armizare is pretty good, but I'm not a huge fan of published interpretations in general (due to the changing nature of these things).
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Re: Is there a good Fiore dei Liberi book?

Postby Lidsman » 28 Dec 2016 10:35

the_last_alive wrote:Bob Charettes Armizare is pretty good, but I'm not a huge fan of published interpretations in general (due to the changing nature of these things).


Thanks! For a beginner its a little bit easier to use someones interpretation than make your own but yes, I think you're right.
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Re: Is there a good Fiore dei Liberi book?

Postby Sean M » 10 Jan 2017 23:37

There is another in three volumes, but whether it is good or bad depends on what kind of reader you are.

the_last_alive wrote:Bob Charettes Armizare is pretty good, but I'm not a huge fan of published interpretations in general (due to the changing nature of these things).

It sure would be great if someone would write a book on "how to read Fiore's manuscripts," with a bare minimum of technical interpretation so students can start working through the manuscripts themselves without repeating the last 20 years of mistakes, isn't it? It would talk about the structure of the manuscripts, and all the knowledge which Fiore took for granted but modern readers don't have, and have a few photos of the poste with discussions of why he does them that way. I thought I had read a book like that, by someone quiet and grey-haired with a beautiful harness, printed by some guys in Chicago, but maybe my memory is misleading me.

I notice that being in this community causes a lot of people's memories to get fuzzy, at least when it is time to respect other people and their work.
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