Heron Armoury?

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Postby Stunt Weasel » 28 Mar 2006 10:37

What Caz said. Over prolonged periods of time, any sword can loosen slightly. I find it much easier to simply tighten the pommel with a mild twist than to have to worry about repeening the bloody thing. With the Lutel rapier I have it was so tightly assembled I actually had hell unscrewing it the first time (took me nearly five minutes)!

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Postby Caz » 28 Mar 2006 10:41

Kim Young wrote:Thanks Caz, I'll pass that tip on. :)
Kim


No prob

:D
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Postby Caz » 28 Mar 2006 10:42

Stunt Weasel wrote: I find it much easier to simply tighten the pommel with a mild twist than to have to worry about repeening the bloody thing.


It's become second nature for me to check at the start of every excercise that the pommel is tight...and because I do, it invariably is!
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Postby Stunt Weasel » 28 Mar 2006 10:49

Ditto.

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Postby scholadays » 28 Mar 2006 10:59

Would plumbers tape help to stop a threaded pommel from loosening?
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Postby Stunt Weasel » 28 Mar 2006 11:01

No. It has to do with the wood in the handle compressing over time as well as the way that all screws come loose with time.

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Postby J Marwood » 28 Mar 2006 11:12

I'm not sure that the wood compression could be solved, but the gradual loosening should be solved by tape or thread-lock glue.
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Postby Caz » 28 Mar 2006 11:13

J Marwood wrote:I'm not sure that the wood compression could be solved, but the gradual loosening should be solved by tape or thread-lock glue.


if you thread lock the pommel, and the grip compresses, then the hilt pieces would come loose and vibtrate... not ideal...
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Postby J Marwood » 28 Mar 2006 11:24

Good point :)

Are there other materials which could be used which don't compress? Metal, Horn etc?
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Postby Stunt Weasel » 28 Mar 2006 11:27

I don't know about metal, although I suspect it would mess with weight and balance just having a metal handle, but I have had swords with handles made of horn and they had the same issues. It's not like the sword loosens up tremendously, though. It's really quite minimal and so as long as you check periodically (i.e. before using it each time) you will never have a problem.

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Postby Fab » 28 Mar 2006 12:31

All organic materials will warp/change volume over time.

Though looking after them well can help - not letting the wood get too dry, stabilizing the horn (or again, not submitting it to extreme temperature/humidity changes).
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Postby J Marwood » 28 Mar 2006 13:50

How does one stabilise horn?
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Postby Paul » 28 Mar 2006 14:09

J Marwood wrote:
Kim Young wrote:Have you handled any of Paul's work? I've put in an order for another one, but I'm still dithering over the quillons. I'm also hoping to sound out some of the Czech makers at Tewkesbury.
Kim


I haven't (other than my singlestick) , although I have seen some pictures. The Czech guys have great prices and I've heard good things about them. I think Mike Stillwell has a couple of things on order from over there.


I also have two swords on order. One fully custom sharp from Vladimir Cervenka, one customised reenactment-grade blunt from Radek Lobko. Both are due this spring, but perhaps not before Dijon. I'll post about them once I get them.

J Marwood wrote:I'm not sure that the wood compression could be solved, but the gradual loosening should be solved by tape or thread-lock glue.


Epoxy should work wonders on both counts. :D
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Postby admin » 28 Mar 2006 14:17

Hi all - I'm sick off work with a stinking cold... was asleep til 1pm..
Anyway, yes my sharp longsword's being done by Mark Vickers. His blunts are also excellent for blunts. The first try at mine actually came out to light - I want a stiffer and more robust blade, so he's redoing it from scratch.
Pretty much most of the makers who I personally rate are on the equipment page here:
http://www.fioredeiliberi.org/equipment/
Many of the Czech makers are good - but I have also seen some real crappy over-weight reenactment crowbards from the Czech Rep as well. One of the reasons that they have so many swordmakers is because they have a strong and popular tradition of theatrical fencing and reenactment.
If I wanted a new longsword blunt I'd go to Mark Vickers probably.
http://www.antique-swords.co.uk/

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Postby Paul » 28 Mar 2006 14:49

admin wrote:Hi all - I'm sick off work with a stinking cold... was asleep til 1pm..
Get well soon mate!

admin wrote:Many of the Czech makers are good - but I have also seen some real crappy over-weight reenactment crowbards from the Czech Rep as well. One of the reasons that they have so many swordmakers is because they have a strong and popular tradition of theatrical fencing and reenactment.
Agreed. Communication can sometimes be difficult too.

admin wrote:If I wanted a new longsword blunt I'd go to Mark Vickers probably.
Yes, he seems to make nice stuff. Any idea what the ballpark figure for his swords is? Say for a simple single hand sword with fuller? Or a simple longsword with diamond cross-section?
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Postby admin » 28 Mar 2006 15:33

You can get a basic blunt from him for about £200-250 I think and a sharp for £250-300. I know some sharps he did for about £280 that are lovely.
http://www.antique-swords.co.uk/

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