SG6: Schola Gladiatoria Bradford

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Postby Colin F. » 13 Oct 2008 19:05

Paul B wrote: partly because his steel fetish goes way beyond mine.


Says the bloke with a complete harness...
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Those old masters taught fighting, we teach nothing but fencing nowadays. - Alfred Hutton, The Swordsman
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Postby Paul B » 24 Oct 2008 12:52

We now have T-Shirts!

Collect and pay at training if you have ordered one - Colin, I will bring yours to school on Wednesday.
.... or I could be completely wrong.

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Postby Colin F. » 24 Oct 2008 18:09

Paul B wrote:Colin, I will bring yours to school on Wednesday.


Sounds good. Armour would be good, they want to have a photo of you, if it is ok, showing you reading in armour. It'll go on a poster for 'Extreme Reading'...
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Postby Paul B » 30 Oct 2008 22:15

Some of those kids were good!

Some cheeky feints - even a single time action. Methinks they will go far given 4 years of Hutton sabre. Perhaps introducing some Easton sabre in the mix?

A new tag line for the chapter-

SG6 - essential killing skills for the under 11's
.... or I could be completely wrong.

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Postby Colin F. » 31 Oct 2008 11:03

Paul B wrote:Some of those kids were good!

Some cheeky feints - even a single time action. Methinks they will go far given 4 years of Hutton sabre. Perhaps introducing some Easton sabre in the mix?

A new tag line for the chapter-

SG6 - essential killing skills for the under 11's


Indeedy, it was a pity some of my top kids were not there. They can throw moulinets, do decent actions on the blade and some have a brilliant sense of distance. One thing they really need to get used to though is the use of the thrust. They all want to do slashy slashy, no pokey pokey, but i'll get them used to it at some point!

Also, the plans are not to stick with just Hutton, maybe some Silver and all sorts. In other words, give them a generic system that works well, not teach them something totally and utterly historical. They wouldn't see the fun in that. Maybe in the summer term teach them some longsword!
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Postby admin » 31 Oct 2008 11:55

That's awesome stuff, well done!
http://www.antique-swords.co.uk/

I like swords more than you.
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Postby Paul B » 16 Nov 2008 22:37

Our local rag paid us a vist the other day:

http://www.thetelegraphandargus.co.uk/n ... ts_of_old/
.... or I could be completely wrong.

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Postby Paul B » 17 Nov 2008 13:04

that throw doesnt look half bad, considering colin was not wearing armour, and my arm harness does tend to be a bit pokey-rippy-bruisy
.... or I could be completely wrong.

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Postby Colin F. » 17 Nov 2008 16:40

I need to lower myself down a bit and rotate with a leg coming round I think... Keep my back up straight and not bend so much. Looked okay though!

Plus they managed to get me skewering the Jawa in the face... awesome! Looking at myself on video, even from those little snippets, I can see somethings I need to work on.

Maybe we should video sparring and drills, having a third perspective might help a lot...
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Postby Paul B » 17 Nov 2008 18:33

I have thought about that, but I want to get people progreessed a bit more, then see what the popular opinion is.
.... or I could be completely wrong.

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Postby Paul B » 17 Nov 2008 18:36

http://3401.e-printphoto.co.uk/nqbradford/index.cfm?z=z

Pics! (but you have to search for paul bennett)
.... or I could be completely wrong.

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Postby Paul B » 20 Nov 2008 00:14

Well the publicity came up trumps, and we had 4 newbies turn up!

I was impressed by a couple of them - mostly down to the capable guidance of the regulars.



We also tried a new tak on sparring - fighting in the barriers.
A 4m square was created with benches and touching them = death. 1 hit only, so short bouts. double kills = both out, so a good quick flowing changearound of fighters.
Liked it i did. Got them moving willfully in towards krieg rather than hanging out in sort of zufechten and being indecisive.


we will do this for a while I think
.... or I could be completely wrong.

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Postby admin » 20 Nov 2008 11:13

Congratulations.
We do a similar thing to encourage people to not back off all the time.
http://www.antique-swords.co.uk/

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Postby Colin F. » 20 Nov 2008 13:27

Yep, twas fun to do, especially as it made me think more about feeling the blade in the bind, and then lifting off and smacking some one. Didn't work much against Paul of course... he just wants to practice krumps all the time...booooring... :wink:
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Postby Paul B » 22 Nov 2008 13:58

.... or I could be completely wrong.

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Krumpathon

Postby Paul B » 27 Nov 2008 13:44

This week had a 50-50 ratio of newbies to regulars, so we went straight into the complicated stuff. :D

Having spent last week recapping for the benefit of new people, I thought we had better get back "on strategy" and work at the krumphau.

We managed to cover just about all the plays of the krumphau from Goliath in 2 hours, and everyone was getting into it, despite my ever confusing rant about what they are supposed to do. By the end of the night, I think everyone was starting to get that its not what you do with the sword, its what you do with the line that matters.

And 4 of the newbies signed up for insurance! Seems like complicated stuff is not a deterrent after all
.... or I could be completely wrong.

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Postby J Marwood » 27 Nov 2008 15:54

Is that the BFHS insurance Paul?
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Postby Paul B » 27 Nov 2008 19:07

Certainly is, as well as my own special tiger insurance, a snip at £10,000.

But it is a good indicator that they will be hanging around for a while :D
.... or I could be completely wrong.

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Postby Paul B » 16 Dec 2008 18:03

Stevie asked me this question, and it is something that I see as an important part of training at SG6, so I though I would share it here.

The information below is based on training with both Dave Rawlings and Thomas Stoeppler. My own musings and training with SG6 have considerably warped and otherwise muddied that up, so any mistakes are my own.

Recognition of distance

http://www.dushkin.com/connectext/psy/ch15/intdis.mhtml


People surround themselves with a "bubble" of personal space that they claim as their own, and they tend to become stressed when other people invade their "bubble." Our personal space protects us from too much arousal and helps us feel comfortable when we communicate with other people.
Hall (1966) called the study of interpersonal distance proxemics. From observing Americans, Hall concluded that four interpersonal distances were important in our social interactions: intimate, personal, social, and public.

1 Intimate distance is from 0 to 1.5 feet. What can be done at this close range? Vision is minimal, and we rely on our senses of smell and touch. Making love or comforting someone are intimate activities, usually restricted to private encounters, which can be performed comfortably at intimate distances. We tend not to get this close to people we are not intimate with, and usually try to escape if we do.
2 Personal distance is from about 1.5 feet to around 4 feet. At this distance, touch is minimal (except perhaps when shaking hands), and vision and hearing become important. This is the distance we use to interact with friends. Within this range, normal conversations can take place easily. We might allow strangers into the outer limits, but reserve the inner limits strictly for friends.
3 Social distance extends from approximately 4 to 12 feet, and includes the space required for more formal social interactions. Hearing and vision are the primary senses involved. The social distance is often utilized in business, for example, in interviewing new applicants for employment or negotiating for a raise.
4 Public distance includes distances greater than 12 feet. Hall suggested that after 25 feet, interpersonal interaction is not possible. At this distance there is little detail involved in communication. A public speaker (actor or politician) communicates only one way with an audience.

Research suggests that we feel uncomfortable when we are too close or too distant from another person (Scott, 1984). How do we learn appropriate social distances? Baxter (1970) suggested that we imitate others in our culture. He reported differences in three cultures in interpersonal spacing, with Mexicans moving closest, White Americans next, and African Americans staying farthest apart.
Sex differences have been reported in personal spacing, as well, with women usually feeling more comfortable at closer distances than men (Ashton & colleagues, 1980). Still other research suggests that interpersonal distance is influenced by social relationships. Women prefer more distance between themselves and an opposite-sex stranger than do men. Ashton and colleagues found that when they asked pairs of friends and strangers to stand at various distances from each other, both men and women felt more comfortable when an opposite-sex friend stood close (about 1@fr{1/2} feet) than when a stranger of either sex stood at that distance. In general, women tend to stand closer when talking with friends than do men. Understanding these sex differences can help us behave appropriately in social situations with both men and women.



I have added numbers to the above quote – there are more distances, and those above are obviously missing the why. Also, the above is rather more relaxed than our usual setting, but it does serve as a quasi-legit way of introducing the subject.

An excersise

1 - Have 2 people stand as far apart as possible in the space you have.
2 – get 1 person to walk slowly towards the other - both should be looking at eacother, but not at the eyes.
3 – the people should be trying to feel the change in tension (usualy in the abdomen, across the shoulders or in the scalp, although some just feel like there is a physical barrier they have just walked through.
4 – have the 2 people communicate with eachother to spot the changes. When one is flet, the person moving should stop and move back and forth into, through and away from the “zone” where the feeling occurs. It should be about 1-2 feet wide.
5 – once both have been the person walking, go to having them both move towards eachother, stopping and feeling out these zones.

6 - Repeat with swords held on the shoulder in a relaxed fashion. This generaly is where the confusion starts, as people will consciously try to repeat stopping at the same intervals, however, their sense of the distance has adjusted for the weapon. Expect a lot of second guessing and unsure footwork as the conscious and slightly less conscious mind argue.

So, what does this all mean? The number of distances increases because we are more acutely aware in a combat situation, however, I have found these to be more or less constant in everyday life as well.

The question you mind askes is not “how far away is he?”, it is “where is the threat?”

1 Elbow - I can hit you with my elbow without taking a step (killing distance)
2 Hand - I can hit you with my hand, without taking a step(harming distance)
3 Step - I can hit you with my hand with a step (reaction time distance)
4 Step/hand - I can hit your hand with my hand if I take a step (first possibility of conflict if you do nothing or present a forward target)
5 To the fight - We can come into contact (with hands) if we both step (first possibility of conflict)
6 Collision detection – This is where we are aware of eachother in respect of something we may have to deal with
7 On the radar – I am aware of you, but not too concerned


Everybody has this and uses it every day. For example, distance 6 is where people will start movong to avoid you. Distance 7 is the distance at which armed forces are trained to draw weapons in order to be able to draw, aim and fire without becoming stressed, while a person is moving towards you. Distance 3 is where you stand when taking to a coleague.

These are also irregularly shaped zones, not a circle centred on the person, but a sort of flame shaped area, getting “fatter” the closer you get to a person.

So, why bother with the excersises if we know and use this already?
Because it is not an absolute sense of distance. It is based on a sense of threat – your mind is queing up various responses based on this threat and that is what translates as tension felt in these zones or bands.

Try the exersise above, but now hold your sword aloft in a threatening manner and look your partner in the eye. You will find that the intervals increase, as the threat has gone up.

Try it with your sword down, shoulders down and pulled forward, weight on your back foot, head tiled to one side, eyes averted downwards. You will find the intervals decrease because you are presenting a “submissive” body posture.

Try establishing eye contact then taking it away near to crossing one of the zones. Try longer paces or shorter ones and see how that affects the intervals.

What we need to move towards is an absolute reconing of distance based on how far away yor opponent is. To do this, we need to use and modify the insticts we already have.

Another exersise:

1 – Same format as above but with weapons. Both walking, both armed.
2 – co-operatively, both partners attempt to establish distance 5 “to the fight” check the distance by both people launching an attack out to long point – thy should be able to touch eachothers thumbs.
3 – repeat the exersise antagonisticly. One will launch an attack, the other must respond with an attack, but at the appropriate distance. Taking a step back or sideways, or shifting the feet around if needs be.
4 – repeat for various distances as you see fit.

You could also use the warmup to do some distance work, such as:
dagger play (newspaper and gaffer)
dancing – establish a distance and have one person move freely while the other must keep distance. An attack on command helps liven things up

Eventualy you will be able to start all of your paired drills out of distance and close in a fairly realistic manner – thus helping the transition to unco-operative drills

A lot of people know a lot of tricks (like the examples of playing with body posture and eye contact above) that manipulate an opponents perception of distance. What makes them all work though, is that person having this sort of skill at judging distance objectively.

Most of the time, when you see people sparring and striking from out of distance, they are feeling distance 5 set in, hesitate and then try to strike as if it were distance 4. 90% of the time (if the camera is well placed) you can see a marked tension in the back as they cross into distance 5, well before they strike.
.... or I could be completely wrong.

Paul Bennett SG6 - Bradford (Won/Lost/Played) 0/1/1
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Postby Paul B » 29 Jan 2009 21:54

Spurred on by G's endless emo whining, we did 2 hours of sparring. Not just fighting, but directed freeplay, co-operative sparring and some games afterwards.

Good sweaty fun.
.... or I could be completely wrong.

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