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As Green As They Come

PostPosted: 22 Sep 2009 07:41
by British
Hi, I'm completely new to this topic. And as such I'll be asking you some really stupid questions. So please bear with me.

I quit doing karate about a year ago because I've moved to a more rural location. There are no classes close enough.
And having had a faint interest in the sword yealding past I've been wondering about buying one. But my trouble is where to start and what to go for. I have seen some sword training where the stances are what will come natural to me through my karate training. And the sort of sword that appeals to my eyes are the ones with a handle (proper name needed) is held by a hand and a half. Double edged and straight. Without the use of a sheild.
I have more queries besides. But that'll do for now.

So, can any of you help me out here, please.

PostPosted: 22 Sep 2009 10:33
by Corpsie
Welcome,

It sounds like you're looking at the longsword/traditional 'knightly' style of blade.

I'll start this with a disclaimer- My weapons are rapier (pointy, stabby thing for civilians) and backsword (cutty, stabby thing) this means that my knowledge is neither comprehensive or guaranteed accurate.

First of all, you don't need to worry about hand and a half- you can learn one handed techniques and two handed, the sword will tell you what can or can't be used. The line blurs quite a bit since twohanded methods have grappling, punching, kicking in the bollocks and disarms.

There are two traditions that are covered in depth in these forums: Fiore (http://www.fioredeiliberi.org/phpBB2/viewforum.php?f=6) and Liechtenauer (http://www.fioredeiliberi.org/phpBB2/viewforum.php?f=13) both are interesting and neither is 'better' than the other. My suspicion is that Fiore will be easier to translate to Karate-ese and so would be a good place for you to start.

I could be wrong and Liechtenauer may be more to your liking, both are really quite fun and I'd recommend trying a little of both and seeing which suits your personality and learning style.

PostPosted: 25 Sep 2009 20:50
by British
Thank you. You hit the nail on the head with the sort of sword that appeals to me. Now, I'm on a tight budget. And as a complete newby I don't want to pay a massive amount for something. But I would want it to be tough enough to be able to withstand some use.
I was thinking I should go for a reenactors sword, with no sharpness. For obvious reasons. And I want it to be quite plain in appearance. I really don't like those heavily ornate things.

Also... I am in a semi rural area. Near to Whitby, North Yorkshire. Does anyone know of a school or club that I might train with. If not, is it possible to train on ones own with satisfactory results? I'm guessing not. But are they any sort of training aid videos in a similar fashion as a kata is to karate?

Thanks.

PostPosted: 25 Sep 2009 21:05
by Paul B
http://www.bfhs.org/

SSS have a school there, but they do later styles.
Stevie T on this forum is in Darlington, who does english longsword.
SG7 are in Hull, doing unarmed and dagger

PostPosted: 27 Sep 2009 09:28
by The Guardsman
Paul B wrote:http://www.bfhs.org/

SSS have a school there, but they do later styles.
Stevie T on this forum is in Darlington, who does english longsword.
SG7 are in Hull, doing unarmed and dagger


SG7 Now covers Longsword and spear too!

PostPosted: 27 Sep 2009 09:50
by Cutlery Penguin
British wrote:Thank you. You hit the nail on the head with the sort of sword that appeals to me. Now, I'm on a tight budget. And as a complete newby I don't want to pay a massive amount for something. But I would want it to be tough enough to be able to withstand some use.
I was thinking I should go for a reenactors sword, with no sharpness. For obvious reasons. And I want it to be quite plain in appearance. I really don't like those heavily ornate things.


Don't do this. You will only regret the money you've spent later on. If you simply want it as a training sword then you're better off getting somethign specifically designed for training. Paul B's "ubershinai" perform well and will allow you to spar with pretty much any group when you manage to get to them. Alternatively you could hold fire for a few months and get one of the new plastic training swords from The Knight Shop, they seem pretty handy.

In the mean time a simple stick is good enough what you need to work on is how to move yourself, the weapon is secondary.

Also... I am in a semi rural area. Near to Whitby, North Yorkshire. Does anyone know of a school or club that I might train with. If not, is it possible to train on ones own with satisfactory results? I'm guessing not. But are they any sort of training aid videos in a similar fashion as a kata is to karate?

Thanks.


Do you have transport? It would really benefit you to have someone to work with. It is perfectly possible to start from scratch and work it out yourself (it's how a lot of us started) but you will save years of mistakes and slow progress if you can get a helping hand.

PostPosted: 27 Sep 2009 12:50
by The Guardsman
British wrote:Thank you. You hit the nail on the head with the sort of sword that appeals to me. Now, I'm on a tight budget. And as a complete newby I don't want to pay a massive amount for something. But I would want it to be tough enough to be able to withstand some use.
I was thinking I should go for a reenactors sword, with no sharpness. For obvious reasons. And I want it to be quite plain in appearance. I really don't like those heavily ornate things.

Also... I am in a semi rural area. Near to Whitby, North Yorkshire. Does anyone know of a school or club that I might train with. If not, is it possible to train on ones own with satisfactory results? I'm guessing not. But are they any sort of training aid videos in a similar fashion as a kata is to karate?

Thanks.


Colin Richards has just released a DVD for students. Have a look in the market area of the Forum.

PostPosted: 27 Sep 2009 14:05
by admin
As Oz said, steer clear of most reenactment longswords. A stick or shinai is good enough to get started with and it's what many groups with start you training with anyway, before letting you move to steel.
If you really want a basic blunt steel longsword then one of these it what many people are using:
http://shop.suspensionofdisbelief.co.uk ... half-sword

or:
http://shop.suspensionofdisbelief.co.uk ... half-blunt

or:
http://shop.suspensionofdisbelief.co.uk ... word-blunt