Fencing practice in medieval England

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Re: Fencing practice in medieval England

Postby MEversbergII » 01 Jul 2014 15:50

I'm going to guess "handball" is rugby's great, great, great...grandfather.

M.
When I was a fighting-man, the kettle-drums they beat,
The people scattered gold-dust before my horses feet;
But now I am a great king, the people hound my track
With poison in my wine-cup, and daggers at my back.

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Re: Fencing practice in medieval England

Postby Jonathan Waller » 01 Jul 2014 19:46

In general hand ball refers to something like squash where a ball was hit against a wall using the hand instead of a bat or racket, interestingly I have seen something like it being played in documentaries and films about prisons in the US.

The grandfather of Rugby was foot ball, though the foot part was fairly open for some time. but it became more about using the feet. Rugby was supposed to have come in to being when a pupil at Rugby School, during a game of football, picked up the ball and ran with it. Rugby is properly called Rugby football...
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Re: Fencing practice in medieval England

Postby fullplate » 01 Jul 2014 19:57

Shouldn't hand ball come under the classification : Fives.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fives
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Re: Fencing practice in medieval England

Postby Jonathan Waller » 01 Jul 2014 20:26

More likely the other way round, fives a type of hand ball. Pretty sure there are mentions of hand ball in edicts etc for archery pre-date the use of the name fives...
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Re: Fencing practice in medieval England

Postby MEversbergII » 02 Jul 2014 15:20

I guess people had a habit of bouncing the balls off any damn thing, otherwise I'm not sure why anyone would bother banning it.

M.
When I was a fighting-man, the kettle-drums they beat,
The people scattered gold-dust before my horses feet;
But now I am a great king, the people hound my track
With poison in my wine-cup, and daggers at my back.

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Re: Fencing practice in medieval England

Postby Jonathan Waller » 02 Jul 2014 15:41

The main reason for all "such vain plays" being banned was that people were playing them instead of practising their archery. Also football matches could be pretty violent as games. Also they were often used as opportunities to settle grudges, there are a number of accounts from the Borders of all kinds of things taking place at football matches, as they also knew that certain people were coming to watch or take part in the game, so they were a good time to organise a "hit" kidnapping etc. So the fact that things could get out of hand, were also a good reason for banning or restricting them...
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Re: Fencing practice in medieval England

Postby Thearos » 26 Nov 2014 17:57

Actually a link to this

viewtopic.php?f=4&t=20865

belongs in this thread
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Re: Fencing practice in medieval England

Postby SteelCat » 26 Nov 2014 21:57

Jonathan Waller wrote:The main reason for all "such vain plays" being banned was that people were playing them instead of practising their archery. Also football matches could be pretty violent as games. Also they were often used as opportunities to settle grudges, there are a number of accounts from the Borders of all kinds of things taking place at football matches,.




Haha. The hooligans were on the field in those days... :lol:
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