Ambidextrous Sabre Fencing

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Postby Ulrich von L...n » 21 Nov 2014 08:27

Chris,
Very interesting story!

According to WorldCat Terrone was born in 1872, and the Hall of Fame's article says he was fencing coach at the University of Pennsylvania between 1903-1942. Do we know when he died? What do you think around what date he wrote his book?

I found an interesting, but incomplete quote from the book (1959):
"He was practically ambidextrous. He now suggested that in every competition touches should be scored alternatively with right and left hand. Unfortunately, the national bodies controlling the ..."
Page 15
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Re:

Postby Chris Holzman » 22 Nov 2014 04:20

Ulrich von L...n wrote:Chris,
Very interesting story!

According to WorldCat Terrone was born in 1872, and the Hall of Fame's article says he was fencing coach at the University of Pennsylvania between 1903-1942. Do we know when he died? What do you think around what date he wrote his book?

I found an interesting, but incomplete quote from the book (1959):
"He was practically ambidextrous. He now suggested that in every competition touches should be scored alternatively with right and left hand. Unfortunately, the national bodies controlling the ..."
Page 15



I really don't know. His book illustrates women fencing sabre, but wearing skirts. It also illustrates teaching cuts by starting from an overhead chambered position. I tend to think it was written somewhere between say, the 1921 and 1940-ish, but that's just a guesstimate. Edoardo de Simone wrote a history of the Scuola Magistrale in 1921, and I believe it had been closed at that time. Terrone mentioned in his book that the school was defunct. There is video of Bela di Tuscan's female students fencing foil wearing skirts, which is from 1934, but I don't think the practice lasted much after that.
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Postby Ulrich von L...n » 12 Feb 2015 11:16

While reading a totally unrelated topic (HEMAA, How could we get HEMA into the olympics?), I have found this bit:
Roger Norling wrote:And if we look at some other styles, it was even considered important to work with both hands. Norse Konungs Skuggsja from the 13th century, and Swedish Military Sabre manuals teach the same thing.

The Swedish military sabre stuff was already quoted and discussed, so I have checked Konungs Skuggsja's part.

"Formerly the custom was for all who wished to become expert in such arts and thoroughly proficient
in war and chivalry to train both hands alike to the use of weapons. Strive after the same skill, if you find yourself gifted for it, inasmuch as those who are trained in that way are the most perfect in these activities and the most dangerous to their enemies
."
Konungs Skuggsja, Second Part,
XXXVII, The Duties, Activities, and Amusements if the Royal Guardsmen

Source: http://www.mediumaevum.com/75years/mirror/sec2.html
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Re:

Postby Dave B » 13 Feb 2015 13:57

Ulrich von L...n wrote:Dave,

Keep us updated about your experiment.


Not well. I'm now comfortable drilling with the right hand, I can moulinet OK, and I can accurately control my targeting of a cut. The right is nearly as strong as the left which certainly wasn't the case previously.

If I try to actually fence, it's horrible. As soon as I have to parry in a hurry I make a mess of it. My left shoulder tries to come forward and my sword arm draws back, my elbow is determined to put itself where it can best be hit. My lunge is horrible under pressure, with my right toe turning in and my left knee heading god knows where. And if I pass backwards when pressed I trip over my feet.

More practice needed.
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