Making an heavy sport sabre

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Re: Making an heavy sport sabre

Postby admin » 11 Apr 2014 10:48

Hi Chris,
I don't really see an explanation there. He says that you can use a lighter sword for fencing than for combat, but doesn't explain why that would be desirable - or does he explain that somewhere else?

From my point of view, whilst a lighter sabre is nice for comfort and safety, it seems poorly adapted for preparing swordsmen for using the 'real' weight fighting sword. This was the main objection to the singlestick - that it was too light to represent a sword realistically. Hutton in his early writings strongly argues for soldiers to train with practice swords that are equal in weight to their combat swords.
http://www.antique-swords.co.uk/

I like swords more than you.
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Re: Making an heavy sport sabre

Postby Chris Holzman » 11 Apr 2014 20:25

Deleting double post
Last edited by Chris Holzman on 11 Apr 2014 20:27, edited 1 time in total.
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Chris Holzman
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"[T]he calm spirit is the only force that can defeat instinct, and render us the masters of all our strengths." -Capt. Settimo Del Frate, 1876.
Author of "The Art of the Dueling Sabre".
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Re: Making an heavy sport sabre

Postby Chris Holzman » 11 Apr 2014 20:26

Matt,

Here is the full section, and this plus the other stuff in the introduction is about all he really has to say about it. That said, I think its worth keeping in mind that the fencing master's school which used the fencing sabre (essentially an officers weight sabre) was a 3 year full time program that ran 5 and a half days a week. I suspect anyone would be grateful for the lighter fencing sabre under those conditions.

"Among the top issues that had to be defined and overcome in order to prepare material that could respond to the practical needs was to choose and adopt a model of sabre that, while presenting convenient solidity, also corresponded in its weight to the strength of the men who were to use it, and made so as to be gripped with the utmost firmness and ease, with its various parts so proportioned, and so balanced as to present itself for easy use. Weight, Grip, Length, Balance, and Center of Percussion; here are the main points that were to direct the resolution of this issue. Without speaking then, of the various studies and experiences that were had for some years by the order of the Ministry of War, in the regiment in which I have the honor of serving, in order to resolve this issue of the greatest importance it may be assumed for certain that a sabre of the model recently approved by the Ministry of War with the measurements noted in Table 1 may be considered convenient for the Cavalry Solder. It is not however, to be believed that a sabre so made has reached perfection, because it could be improved in the guard, and lightened in the grip with improvement in the center of percussion, but to reduce and maintain the solidity it would have been necessary to use steel instead of iron, and therefore an expense that would not have been in comparison to the benefit. For a sabre that must serve only for use in fencing it is natural that it can be much lighter in all its parts than that intended for the soldier, and through the experience of many years it can be established that with the observation of the weights and measures in the above indicated table (TN: from which I pull the weights in a prior post) an apt sabre can be had for the above indicated use. Also, I need to add that the blade must be from Solingen, and the guard of steel instead of iron, so that you will obtain a weight and blow that is more convenient for easy handling."
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Chris Holzman
Moniteur D' Armes
"[T]he calm spirit is the only force that can defeat instinct, and render us the masters of all our strengths." -Capt. Settimo Del Frate, 1876.
Author of "The Art of the Dueling Sabre".
Chris Holzman
Staff Sergeant
 
Posts: 220
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