Other forms of EMA

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Other forms of EMA

Postby pandabean » 04 Sep 2006 15:13

I was wondering what other not so common forms of EMA are there.

I was quite interested in Donnelly's class with the cane and have found a couple papers relating to that.


Also I am looking for more info regarding Quarterstaff. I have a couple short papers but they do not go into a lot of detail.
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Postby admin » 04 Sep 2006 15:23

Hi Andy - if you want to get more staff material then I recommend Linacre's online library:

http://www.sirwilliamhope.org/Library/

Wylde has a cool system for the staff, quite well described. Swetnam and Silver have staff sections as well.

There are some truly obscure areas of HEMA - like the use of flails in Paulus Hector Mair and Sutor. But these obscure bits don't normally give much detail in terms of technique. One area that had loads of detailed sources, but is not much studied, is rifle/musket and bayonet. We're soon to put online Hutton's most excellent treatise on the use of rifle and bayonet.
http://www.antique-swords.co.uk/

I like swords more than you.
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Postby J Marwood » 04 Sep 2006 16:34

Donnelly's cane class was Bartitsu. There is a groupo called the Bartitsu Society which has published a book on the subject and has a yahoo mailing list.
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Postby pandabean » 04 Sep 2006 16:34

I think I came across that when I was searching for info on it.

J Marwood wrote:Donnelly's cane class was Bartitsu. There is a groupo called the Bartitsu Society which has published a book on the subject and has a yahoo mailing list.
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Postby Kyro_Lantsberger » 05 Sep 2006 00:15

Bartitsu has a small bit of literary fame. Im not sure if anybody here has ever been a Sherlock Holmes fan, but Holmes claimed to have used a Bartitsu technique at one point. If I remember correctly, it was after A C Doyle resurrection of the character. He needed a reason to explain how Holmes survived the encounter with Moriarty at Rickenbacher falls.

It at least shows the Bartitsu was known in enough circles to make a good literary device.

**wheez, cough**

Back to my geeky self for knowing that stuff.
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Postby J Marwood » 05 Sep 2006 01:40

Conan Doyale actually referred to it as 'Baritsu'. There is debate as to whether or not this was a deliberate mispelling or a genuine error. The reference was made in 'The Adventure of the Empty House' from 1903. Holmes claimed 'some knowledge, however, or Baritsu, or the Japanese system of wrestling'

Both Doyle and Barton-Wright wrote for Pearsons magazine in the 1890s so it is possible the reference came from a misremembered article, or it is possible that Doyle had a clipping from the Times of 23/08/1901which reported a 'Baritsu' demonstration. To make it even more confusing, in the US edition Baritsu was subsituted by the term Jiujitsu. 'Baritsu' has been referenced in a number of later detective fictions such as Doc Savage and the Shadow.

For a more indepth discussion of Baritsu, see Tony Wolf's article on the subject which is the Bartitsu Compendium.

Of course, Bartitsu is more than just ju-jitsu, including techniques from western wrestling, boxing and la canne. Holmes was himself a capable boxer and singlesticker.
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Postby Kyro_Lantsberger » 05 Sep 2006 02:35

Wow, Im very impressed by the breadth of esoteric knowledge on this forum.
Things like Bartitsu and other similar methods show that the puglists of a hundred years ago had already learned the lessons which have led to the formation of contemporary MMA.

In terms of the original questions in the thread. There are some few and far between practicioners of some traditional European wrestling styles out there. You can google the terms, but Glima still exists in a limited degree (Scandinavian wrestling.) as does Schwingen (Swiss wrestling). There is an ethnic farming town nearby me ( Minnesota USA) that has a Schwingen demo at its fall harvest fest.
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