Practice swords and distal taper

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Practice swords and distal taper

Postby Paul » 21 Aug 2006 09:47

I've noticed that most reenactment swords have a noted lack of distal taper compared to most historical replicas.

As a result they feel somewhat heavy and clumsy, because they remain quite thick all the way up to the tip.

Is this neccessary for the sword to remain safe or durable in your opinion? Or is it simply a shortcut to lower manufacturing costs?
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Postby Harry » 21 Aug 2006 10:10

well paul, if you would se how some stagefighting are doing their shows you wouldn't ask! :D :D
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Postby Paul » 21 Aug 2006 10:24

Harry wrote:well paul, if you would se how some stagefighting are doing their shows you wouldn't ask! :D :D


Yeah... :wink:

But I meant for HEMA.
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Postby admin » 21 Aug 2006 10:35

It's just to make them cheaper to make. And probably partly also because a lot of makers don't seem to have actually looked at any originals! So they think what they are doing is right because it looks like the pictures in their books...

IMO the best kind of reenactment sword would be those shown in Rene d'Anjou's tournament book, with big fullers to keep them light and a square end. Or the German training swords.

As a side-note, not all medieval swords have much distal taper - particularly some types XV, XVII and pointy types.
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Postby Paul » 21 Aug 2006 10:41

admin wrote:IMO the best kind of reenactment sword would be those shown in Rene d'Anjou's tournament book, with big fullers to keep them light and a square end.
Do you have a picture handy?
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Postby admin » 21 Aug 2006 10:56

Image
http://www.antique-swords.co.uk/

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Postby Herbert » 21 Aug 2006 11:34

The best training sword I have ever come along is the one made by Pavel Moc:
http://www.swords.cz/pictures/swords/howe06.jpg

It has some distal taper, has the balance of an original, have a rounded almost flat tip, thick edges and bends like a fechtfeder. So you have all the advantages without any disadvantage - oh wait, there is one disadvantage... the price!

Apart from that, its wonderful

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Postby admin » 21 Aug 2006 12:42

Interesting! I notice that the section of the blade is exactly like the Rene d'Anjou tournament sword 8)
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Postby Herbert » 21 Aug 2006 12:51

Yes, that is why it works so well. I had my thoughts about this profile years ago. I thought it must be possible to construct a blade with thick edges and a deep and broad fuller for balance and flexibility. Then I learned that somebody had the same thoughts long long time ago - Rene d'Anjou. Then I saw Pavel Mocs sword and bought it instantly. Still glad I did it, I can only recommend it.

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Postby Fab » 21 Aug 2006 12:57

I think I remember PJ saying about the same thing......
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Postby Herbert » 21 Aug 2006 13:07

Thats why I am so eager to see the results of Albions Maestro Line if they will ever get ready...

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