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PostPosted: 25 Mar 2006 00:16
by Stunt Weasel
For what it's worth, it's definitely an achievable goal to lose the weight. I trained an actor for a liveshow for about two months and he dropped 45 pounds down to 205 in that time!

Mario

PostPosted: 25 Mar 2006 00:23
by Monster Zero
I've already lost over 110... I've been at a plateau for a year due to work interferance with my training schedule and illness.

PostPosted: 25 Mar 2006 03:11
by Stunt Weasel
Hmm. Well, that's quite impressive, Thom, seriously. I'm sure once you get back into the swing of things it'll keep going down.

Mario

PostPosted: 25 Mar 2006 03:56
by Alina
James - thanks I'd love the manual. See, savate uses toe kicks which I'm fascinated by. When I first did martial arts I did TKD/Hapkido and learned chambered kicks. Then when I did Hsing-I and San Shou kickboxing I learned a more thai style of kicking that was far more powerful. Well, lately I've been looking at savate and I realized that chambered kicks using the toe could do massive damage - since savateurs wear shoes and so do people on the street. So I'm starting to think that the quick chambered toe kicks might be the most effective ones to use. When I was doing hapkido I'd do hundreds of kicks with each leg every day to train, and my feet were quite literally faster than my hands. I'm not nearly where I was, but I can get it back with a few months of training. So, I'm thinking Savate might be the style for me since I also love western boxing.

PostPosted: 25 Mar 2006 04:14
by Stunt Weasel
With good alignment and a nice hard shoe, a toe kick can be devastating, Alina. I've taken a few and given a few. They really suck!

Mario

PostPosted: 25 Mar 2006 04:58
by Monster Zero
I've found that every type of kick or punch has its purpose. Muay Thai is good for some, savate good for others. It's really about building an effective fighting repetoir.

PostPosted: 25 Mar 2006 07:03
by Alina
Stunt Weasel wrote:With good alignment and a nice hard shoe, a toe kick can be devastating, Alina. I've taken a few and given a few. They really suck!

Mario


Yeah, I was thinking much the same thing. I agree with Thom as well, it's about having a nice bag of tricks. Toe kicks seem to be a quick, powerful use of the legs without as much commitment as a thai style kick requires. Course, that doesn't mean you shouldn't know the thai kicks as well.

PostPosted: 25 Mar 2006 09:35
by Stunt Weasel
Naturally, being well rounded is important. Personally I'm always far more interested in good responses to the varying kinds of kicks.

Mario

PostPosted: 25 Mar 2006 12:08
by Paul
In my Pencak Silat style, toe kicks are the most used ones. I'm not much of a kicker, and it's the only kick I can be reasonably fast with.

Because we train bare footed, they can be a pain sometimes. The key is to fold the toes upward and kick with the ball of the foot.

Shoes (steel toed, if you must) definately make it easier.

PostPosted: 25 Mar 2006 12:16
by Stunt Weasel
I've never seen anything other than front kicks in pencak silat, but my exposure to the style has been somewhat limited. Does your school teach other kicks as well, Paul?

Mario

PostPosted: 26 Mar 2006 22:15
by Monster Zero
Kicks in my style are very different then, we do sort of sweeping, stomping kicks.

PostPosted: 26 Mar 2006 23:55
by Paul
We might just have a small communication problem here.

The kick I meant is like this (assuming you want to hit the crotch with your toes):
- raise the knee straight forward until the upper leg is level
- throw out the lower leg, the key is speed.
- curl up the toes to prevent injury, hitting with the ball of your foot
This kick is pretty basic and limited, but very fast and handy against someone who doesn't cover his crotch. :wink:

You can do something similar from the side (against the knee for instance). Instead of just raising the knee, you have to cant your hips, like a peeing dog.

Both of these kicks can also hit with the shin, but the idea is usually to hit with the ball of the foot.

We also do scissors (from low-S position), sweeps, and kicks (more to stop an incoming kick or step) straight forward with the inside of the foot (high-S). The high-S can be seen here:
http://www.pencak-silat-germany.de/seit ... eetrap.jpg

And occassionaly we do sideways kicks from high-H like this:
High-H:
http://www.kpsnusantara.com/rapid/compe ... no1_06.jpg
Kick:
http://www.kpsnusantara.com/rapid/compe ... no1_07.jpg
Our are slightly different, but close enough.

All kicking is generally below the waistline, as above the waistline is too easy to deflect or even catch.

The "straight toe kick", the high-S and occassionaly a scissor are the only ones I ever employ in sparring. The rest is just way too slow.

PostPosted: 27 Mar 2006 00:25
by Stunt Weasel
Thanks for clarifying, Paul. I never studied pencak silat but knew a few practitioners and they always favored hand techniques in sparring. I had only ever seen them kick low with front kicks and also what you call the high s-kick, so I wasn't sure if the style involved any other foot techniques.

Mario

PostPosted: 27 Mar 2006 00:42
by Paul
Yes, hand (and especially forearm) techniques rule. 8)

They are quicker and don't interfere with the footwork.

The "high-S" is not the Indonesian term btw, but it's the one we use.

PostPosted: 27 Mar 2006 01:58
by Stunt Weasel
The term I've always heard and used for that technique among circles out here is the stop kick, even though it doesn't always have anything to do with stopping an incoming kick.

Mario

PostPosted: 27 Mar 2006 07:39
by Paul
Stopkick.... I kinda like that term! :D

It describes it quite well, as it's a very powerful kick for blocking incoming kicks as well as incoming steps. Since many Pencak Silat players want to close the distance fast, aggressive incoming steps are quite common, and this is a nice way to check them. :wink:

PostPosted: 27 Mar 2006 10:43
by Stunt Weasel
The stop kick is one of my favorites in sparring, as is the low roundhouse kick with the shin. I've recently gotten quite good at executing the spin back kick (typically to about gut level) as part of practice drills, but I'm a little nervous to use it in sparring as I hate turning my back even for a split second.

Mario

PostPosted: 28 Mar 2006 09:06
by J Marwood
Forthose interested in 'street' kicks - google the 'Tegner kick'. It is a bastardised Karate mae-geri, delivered with the toes. It is a staple of many modern combatives programmes.

I'd also suggest drilling a straight punt at shin or knee level. I (accidentally) tooka guy out of a class with one of these in a pressure drill a few months back. He was wearing shin pads as well :)

PostPosted: 28 Mar 2006 17:03
by Monster Zero
The term doesn't mean it's specific to stopping an incoming kick, rather it stops an incoming attack or advance from the opponent.


Stunt Weasel wrote:The term I've always heard and used for that technique among circles out here is the stop kick, even though it doesn't always have anything to do with stopping an incoming kick.

Mario

PostPosted: 28 Mar 2006 17:07
by J Marwood
Just like a fencing stop-hit?