Easton Antique Arms

www.antique-swords.co.uk

HOME ANTIQUE SWORDS FOR SALE TERMS AND CONDITIONS

Click on the photos below for more detailed photos of each. Reasonable offers welcome. P&P cost for a single sword within the UK is £10.

Email me if you are interested in an item at schola-gladiatoria@hotmail.co.uk

I am also interested in purchasing antique swords and muzzle-loading firearms, particularly British Victorian and particularly Wilkinsons.

Feel free to email me with photos if you have something to sell.

BRITISH MILITARY SWORDS
A 1912 pattern British cavalry officers sword. The blade is sound and straight and firm in the hilt with no markings or decoration apart from a worn brass proof disc. There is a serial number 12004 on the back of the forte. The hilt and the blade were painted brown at some point in its career and traces of this remain on the guard and on the blade especially in the fuller and at the tip. Sadly the sword has been neglected and the hilt itself has lost most of its shark skin and the wooden handle has a split in it.The pommel is slightly loose but despite these issues it is all firm on the hilt. The bowl guard has two tiny holes in it. No scabbard. A restoration project perhaps hence the low price.

£65 + P&P New
An unusual and possibly-British gymnasium (fencing practice) sabre, with a hilt in the German style and a blade in the British style. The sword has no markings and is somewhat of a mystery, having a fullered blade like British 1864 pattern gymnasium swords and and a hilt/wired grip like continental practice weapons. A similar practice sword is shown in the fencing manuals of Captain Alfred Hutton. The blunt blade is firm in the hilt, straight and still flexible, with a deep patina. The symmetrical guard is in good condition and the grip is solid, although the decorative wires are slightly loose. Interestingly the blade is 34.5” - slightly longer than most gymnasium sabres.

£135 + P&P New
A British 1821 pattern Royal Artillery officer's sword dating to the reign of George V and very likely carried in WW1. The blade retains its very sharp service sharpening to the top 6 inches of the blade, front and back. The blade overall is in excellent condition, just with a few small areas of pitting, but otherwise in the original finish, with the etching clear, including the officer's initials of CF, making the sword potentially researchable. The nickel-plated hilt is also in very good condition, much of it in original polish. All the shark skin and wire is present to the grip. The scabbard is also complete, though it could benefit with some light restoration. The whole sword is solid and complete - a nice example of a WW1 sword.

£255 + P&P New
A 1796 pattern light cavalry trooper's sabre, by renowned maker Gill. This example has an even brown patina all over and some heavy pitting on the hilt. It is missing its scabbard and leather cover to the grip. However it is completely solid, the wood of the grip is secure and it is a very nice sword in the hand. The blade remains fairly sharp and there are a few little nicks in the edge. This sabre very likely saw action during the Napoleonic Wars and it is getting increasingly difficult to get hold of this very popular model of sword.

£375 + P&P New
A British 1796 pattern heavy cavalry officer's dress sword. This example has a broader and heavier blade than most and is more like a broadsword than a spadroon. It is in overall good condition, with a nice blue-grey patina to the blade and a lot of the gilt remaining on the attractive double-shell hilt and pommel. The silver wire of the grip is also in good condition and it is a very attractive and relatively scarce sword. The grip has a tiny bit of movement on the tang, which could be corrected, and unfortunately the leather scabbard is missing, hence the low price.

£350 + P&P New & Reduced

An 1854 pattern infantry officer’s sword by Wilkinson with the owners name, A. L. Calcraft, etched on the forte of the blade. The blade is numbered 8973, dating it to 1858, and comes with it’s leather scabbard displaying Wilkinson’s badge. The sword is in fair condition, straight and firm in the hilt and with it’s etching clearly visible, although the blade has some staining and light pitting. The hilt has retained a large amount of its original gilding but has taken a knock, bending the guard downwards (hence the low price). This may be correctable. There is one segment of shagreen missing at the very top of the grip - the rest and the wire is present and correct. The scabbard is in good condition with the leather intact and the brass fittings sound - there is just a little stitching missing near the bottom. The sword does not quite sheath fully, presumably because of leather/wood shrinkage./p>

Anthony Lucas CALCRAFT, Esq. Ensign 39th Regt.

Born 17 Jan 1842, Ensign 39th Regiment of Foot 30 Apr 1858, died of scarlet fever on 27 May 1859.

 

£355 + P&P New

  A British 1845 pattern infantry officer's sword, by Henry Wilkinson, numbered 8418 for September 1857. This is a classic example of the British infantry officer's sword by the top maker in Britain, from the year the Indian Mutiny broke out. The brass scabbard probably signifies an officer of field rank, but unfortunately there is no name recorded on the Wilkinson ledger for 8418 - I will include the record with the sword. The sword is in overall good condition and all solid. The folding brass guard 'drop' works well, the hilt is totally solid and the blade remains in pretty good polish, just with a few dark areas which could be cleaned. The etching is crisp and clear. The scabbard is a bit knocked about, as these brass scabbards usually are, the throat is a bit loose and the 'drag' has been dragged quite a bit, causing a hole in the end. Overall a great sword in reasonable condition, from the top maker in an interesting year, that was probably carried for many years by a senior officer./span>

£499 + P&P New
  A truly superb example of a mid-Victorian 1821 pattern Royal Artillery officer's sword, by Pillin. This sword is in amazing condition, almost like it was made last year, except that it was made some time between 1862 and about 1880. The hilt and blade are still in high polish, with crystal clear and deep top quality etching (Pillin were one of the best sword suppliers in Britain). The scabbard is nickel plated, with only a few small areas of lifting to the plating. The grip and wire are immaculate. The photos say everything really! The scabbard is a perfect fit and the sword sits tight once sheathed. This is the 32.5 inch bladed type of Artillery officer's sword, so it is fairly light, whilst still being solid in the hand.

£595 + P&P New
A rare early-Victorian British yeomanry cavalry sergeant's sword, with name. This sword is highly unusual in that it is named for a Sergeant Higgott, 7 Troop of the Queen's Own Royal Yeomanry. It was likely given as a prize or gift. Being a pipe-backed blade, this dates the sword to between 1837 and 1845 and the maker's name of Barlow, Lichfield, is also present on the other side of the blade. Being a sergeant's sword the grip is leather, rather than shark skin, and the grip and wire are in great condition. The blade has even grey patina, but is in very good condition, with clear etching. The hilt is all solid and sound, though both hilt and scabbard have matching pitting - now an even dark patina. A nice big sword and highly unusual.

£525 + P&P New
AAn 1854 pattern infantry officer's sword, by Wilkinson, with officer's initials and crest to the blade. This sword is numbered 25619 and with the initials LHH and crest of a hawk with a lure, was probably the sidearm of Captain Lawrence Harry Hawkes (the Wilkinson records may confirm this). Captain Hawkes was of the 2nd Battalion, the Welsh Regiment, and he died at Barberton during the Boer War on 13 November 1900. He was born in March 1864 and entered the Bedfordshire Regiment in August 1883, being transferred to the Welsh Regiment the following month, and was promoted Captain in February 1890. The blade is in good condition overall, with clear etching, except where the service sharpening has removed some. Some modification has been done to the ricasso, perhaps to fit a new scabbard, and this has led to the removal of the Henry Wilkinson name and the numbers have become feint (though fairly sure they are 25619). There are also some very small nicks to the front edge. Otherwise the blade is all good and firm in the hilt. The hilt is generally good, with the brass all intact and fish skin present on all of the grip except the pommel segment. The thick wire is present, the thin wires are gone. The backstrap has a little movement, but very superficial. No scabbard unfortunately. Overall a nice example of the type, to an officer who died in service and would reward more research.

£425 + P&P

An 1890 pattern British cavalry sword of the 2nd Dragoons. The 2nd Dragoons (Royal Scots Greys) were a heavy cavalry regiment who, at the time this sword was issued, were serving in the Boer War (including taking part in the relief of Kimberly). The hilt is interesting in that it seems to have either been converted from a previous pattern or perhaps been a repair. The hilt is held firmly on at the pommel end but is not wedged down by base of the blade as in most 1885/1890 patterns. Instead the hole through which the blade passes seems to have been crudely made meaning that while the hilt is perfectly serviceable resting on the grip it doesn’t have the neatness you would normally see. Perhaps a conversion or a field repair. The hilt is in reasonable condition with no significant pitting and with the ENF of Enfield, and the markings for the 2nd Dragoons clearly visible. The blade is straight and has some light pitting and a more pronounced patina. It has been serviced sharpened. The blade has the Enfield inspection marks, the X of the bend test and various date stamps the clearest being ’99 (for an issue date of 1899) with the pattern designation ’90 on the back of the blade at the forte, as well as some letters on the tang. No scabbard./font>

£120 + P&P Reduced

A rare British-Indian 1821 pattern light cavalry officer's sword, with blade etched to the North Western Provinces & Oudh Police Force. This was a mounted police force raised to maintain law and order during and after the Indian Mutiny. The blade is etched with 'NWP & Oudh' with associated crest/badge, Royal crown, '1857-58 Police Force' and emblem of crossed sabres and lances overlain by a horn. Retailer's name - Firmin & Sons, Strand, London and stamped on the spine 'London Made'. The sword probably dates to 1864-1880. The hilt is in good condition with all the shark skin and grip wire intact. The big 35 inch blade is in high polish with only a few dark marks. The etching has been worn a bit feint from years of polishing in service, but it is still fairly clear at attractive. There is a tiny bit of movement in the grip. Sadly there is no scabbard, but this is a highly rare sword, connected to an interesting aspect of Anglo-Indian history and the sword is overall in very good condition. A nice big impressive sword.

£395 + P&P

A rare variant of the British 1796 pattern light cavalry officer's sabre, with square langets. This example is in complete condition, with the grip, grip wire and most of the leather grip covering intact, both langets in place and solid and the guard all present and correct. The plain functional 1796 regulation blade is in pretty good condition for the age and considering it does not have a scabbard, with only minor pitting and staining, and a couple of little notches to the cutting edge. There are no maker's marks that I can see. The hilt is a very little bit loose due to organic shrinkage with age (though not if you grip it tightly), the wooden grip has a crack in it (quite stable thanks to the wire) and a few woodworm holes. Otherwise it is a solid example of a rare and desirable sword that may well have seen action during the last years of the Napoleonic Wars two centuries ago.

£425 + P&P Reduced

A Victorian British infantry officer's sword, by E Thurkle, with officer's heraldic crest and initials, believed to have belonged to Lieut-Colonel Piers William North, D.S.O. Lieut-Col North was awarded the D.S.O. during WW1 and had previously served in the Boer War, with the Royal Berkshire Regiment. He is also a published author (see here). This sword was probably therefore carried by him in both the Boer War and WW1 and remains well service sharpened. The sword is an 1845 type blade that has been re-hilted with the 1895 pattern hilt when that new regulation hilt came into service. The crest identifying Lieut-Col North is a dragon's head, with a crown and chains around the neck, the Latin motto 'Animo et Fide' (identified here). The sword is in overall good condition, the blade bright and firm in the hilt, the nickel plating on the guard fairly good and the shark skin grip and wire very good. A good looking sword, by a good maker and a fantastic officer and history to research.

£545 + P&P

Superb top quality Wilkinson 1854 pattern infantry officer's sword, to named officer, with initials G.L.E.M. etched on blade. The blade, numbered 15577, dates to 1868, the year that the probable officer, George Lycett Engledue May,‏ was commissioned into the 84th Regiment of Foot. He went on to become a Major by April 1883, in the Lancashire Fusiliers. I believe that whilst the blade dates to 1868, the top quality heavy hilt was probably an upgrade, as it is in the 1880's style - so this was probably done by Wilkinson (it is definitely their work) when George May became a Major in 1883 (I own an 1886 example which has an almost identical hilt). The whole sword is in excellent condition, the blade retaining much of its original polish and the etching all being clear. There are only a few slightly dark patches and one very small area of pitting to the false edge and unfortunately the proof slug is missing. The blade has not been sharpened. The hilt is all solid and in excellent order, with crisp edges, tight and complete black shark skin, and all the extra-quality thick wire in place and tight. The field scabbard is another nice touch, I believe also dating to the 1880's, when the new hilt was probably fitted (my 1886 example has a very similar scabbard also). A fantastic sword, with research potential - this weapon dances in the hand. Wilkinson earned their reputation as the best.

£695 + P&P

British 1827 pattern 5th Middlesex Volunteer Rifle Corps Officer's sword, probably 1870s. This is a really nice sword with a lot of original high polish remaining on the blade. There are little patches of darkening to the blade where it has been neglected and rust has formed, but this could be cleaned up, as could the hilt. The hilt is all solid and sound, but could do with some cleaning. The shark skin and wire is good and the wood and leather scabbard, designed to be worn with a Sam Browne belt, is in good condition and complete. A nice sword that would easily reward a little cleaning. The 5th Middx Volunteer Rifles were originally attached to the Royal Fusiliers, City of London Regiment.

£185 + P&P Reserved

British 1827 pattern Volunteer Rifles Officer’s sword, retailed by Woods & Sons. This sword is in good overall condition, with blade retaining much of its original polish and with only minor staining - no notable pitting. The etching is crisp and includes the volunteer rifles badge and the VR royal cypher. The hilt has no movement and all of its shagreen (some a little worn) and grip wire. The leather and steel scabbard is in need of some attention, having split at the end and missing the drag. The sword dates to somewhere between 1859 (the start of the Volunteer rifle movement) and 1892, with the overall form suggesting an earlier date.

£205 + P&P

British special regulation cavalry sword, circa 1853-1864. The overall construction of this is like an 1853 or 1864 pattern cavalry sword, with the same Reeves patent hilt and leather slab grips held on by five rivets. However, the blade is more curved that those regulation patterns, slightly longer at 36 inches, and the guard is a slightly asymmetrical bowl guard somewhat similar to the 1821 heavy cavalry troopers' sword! The guard has two holes which may be for water drainage or some unusual sword knot arrangement. My gut feeling on this sword is that it was either made as an experimental model or (and this is supported by the more curved blade) it was made for an Indian cavalry regiment by special order. It could benefit from further cleaning and restoration work to the leather grip slabs, one of which has perished much more than the other. The blade has pitting. It lacks a scabbard (which if for Indian service may have been wood and leather). However it is an extremely unusual sword and I have not seen another like it, nor seen any like it in original catalogues. It is a very imposing and big sword, with pleasing proportions and some potentially really interesting research to be done on it.

£325 + P&P

 
OTHER EUROPEAN SWORDS
Spanish 1895 pattern cavalry trooper's sword, made in Toledo in 1898. This is a good solid example of an important model of cavalry sword in the history of European cavalry weapons. You can clearly see the new thinking in the hist design which along with other European models led to the development of the British 1908 pattern cavalry sword. In fact this Spanish model is somewhat similar to some British prototypes that appeared around 1900. The grips are hardwood, secured by screw bolts like a bayonet grip, the hilt parts are all steel and very solid, the blade is curved and surprising light weight. This is one of the last European designs of cavalry sword to be curved. The sword and scabbard are in solid condition, but with pitting to the guard and scabbard in particular. There is only very light pitting to the blade. The grip is in good condition.

£225 + P&P New
 
NON-EUROPEAN WEAPONS
No items currently  
 
SOLD ITEMS - some examples of previously sold:

 

British 1896 pattern cavalry officer's sword by Hamburger, Rogers and Co.

SOLD
British 1845 pattern infantry officer's sword by Buckmaster.

SOLD
British 1821 pattern light cavalry officer's fighting sword with plain blade.

SOLD
British 1885 pattern cavalry trooper's sword, by Mole of Birmingham.

SOLD
British 1853 pattern sword by J.E. Bleckmann of Solingen.

SOLD
Swiss 1867 pattern infantry officer's sword, by E & F Hörster.

SOLD
French 1855 pattern infantry officer's sword.

SOLD
A British 1895 pattern infantry officer's sword, retailed by J. Conan of Dublin.

SOLD
A rare British 4-bar hilted 1821 pattern Royal Artillery officer's sword with officer's family crest.

SOLD
British 1845 pattern infantry officer's sword.

SOLD

British 1853 pattern cavalry trooper's sabre, by Mole of Birmingham.

SOLD

Austrian 1845 pattern cavalry trooper's sabre.

SOLD

British 1827 pattern Rifles officer's sword with owner's initials to blade, by Hobson and Sons.

SOLD

French 1822 pattern cavalry officer's sabre by Fournier of Paris.

SOLD

Italian 1888 pattern infantry officer's sword, by F Horster of Solingen.

SOLD

A rare Victorian British river police sword.

SOLD

British 1897 pattern infantry officer's sword, made by Fenton Bros.

SOLD

British 1845 pattern infantry officer's sword.

SOLD

British 1890 pattern cavalry troopers' sword, marked to the 6th Dragoon Guards.

SOLD

A short sword from Sikkim.

SOLD

British 1885 pattern cavalry troopers' sword.

SOLD

Indian tulwar, probably early-mid 19th century.

SOLD

British 1821 pattern heavy cavalry officer’s sword, by Henry Wilkinson, etched with the initials 'A F' and heraldic crest of a greyhound, with the motto ‘Juste et Droit’.

SOLD

Wilkinson 1854 pattern infantry officer's sword, numbered 18818 and initials HPH.

SOLD

British 1845 pattern infantry officer's sword, by Johnstone of Dawson Street, Dublin.

SOLD

British 1897 pattern infantry officer's sword, by Wilkinson. George V. Numbered 61876.

SOLD

British 1821 pattern Royal Artillery officer's sword, from 1860, by Hawkes, given to John Tyndale Greenfield by Lieutenant-Colonel George Wilkins C.B., who had served at the Battle of Waterloo.

SOLD

French 1829 pattern artilleryman's sabre, made in Chatelleraut in 1855.

SOLD

British 1857 pattern Royal Engineers sword by Jones.

SOLD

French 1821 pattern light cavalry officer's sabre.

SOLD

British 1827 pattern Rifle Brigade sword by Wilkinson, probably owned by Sir Charles Roderick Hunter.

SOLD

 

British 1827 pattern Rifles officer's sword, by Firmin & Sons.

SOLD

German 1811 pattern 'Blücher' sabre.

SOLD

British 1821 pattern light cavalry officer's sword.

SOLD

British 1845 pattern infantry officer's sword with Long family crest on blade.

SOLD