Easton Antique Arms

www.antique-swords.co.uk

HOME FOR SALE BUYING AND POSTAGE ANTIQUE SWORD RESEARCH

BUYING AND SELLING ANTIQUE SWORDS AND FIREARMS - PLEASE EMAIL PHOTOS IF YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL.

Email eastonantiquearms@gmail.com to inquire about an item - I take bank transfers in the UK and Paypal in the UK and internationally. I post worldwide.

Buyers of knives and swords in the UK must be over 18.

Please visit and follow our Facebook page.

*IMPORTANT ACTION FOR ANTIQUE COLLECTORS*

The Home Office have released their draft Offensive Weapons Bill, which among other things, proposes to make it illegal to post 'bladed articles' to home addresses in the UK (not law yet, but likely will be). They have included some 'defences' for sporting and re-enactment items. However, they have not mentioned antiques. This, of course, will not reduce access to kitchen knives used in crime, but will greatly affect the antiques industry inadvertently.

If you care about this pointless and unfair legal change, then please submit a letter to the Offensive Weapons Bill Committee at scrutiny@parliament.uk - more information can be found at https://www.parliament.uk/business/news/2018/june/have-your-say-on-the-offensive-weapons-bill/


BRITISH EMPIRE SWORDS FOR SALE
EA5091 - A 1796 pattern infantry officer's spadroon of superior quality. While this does not have a blue and gilt blade, it is the work of Osborn and is more substantial than most examples of this patter. The blade is a little beefier and stiffer, the hilt is a little chunkier and the fit and finish is excellent. The silver grip wire is in great shape and the folding guard flap works perfectly with its little steel reinforcement (little details like these being found from better makers). Everything is quite tight, with just a tiny bit of movement to the silver grip covering, but barely notable. The blade has been service sharpened and the tip looks like it may have been a little re-shaped at the same time (in period).

£450 + P&P NEW
EA5090 - A nice mid-Victorian heavy cavalry officer's sword, retailed by quality outfitter Hamburger, Rogers & Co. This sword is in overall good condition, with a bright blade and hilt, in need of light cleaning. The shagreen and grip wire is generally good, though there is some loss of the shagreen towards the pommel. Everything is solid and the sword sheathes well (though the throat of the scabbard is missing). A nice big sword that feels great in the hand.

£345 + P&P NEW
EA5089 - A Victorian court sword, retailed by Mappin of London. This is an interesting variant with French-style knight's helmet pommel and what appears to be a phoenix motif to the guard. The blade is elegantly etched and carried the VR cypher and crown of Queen Victoria. The patina is quite dark on the blade (though may clean up) and the hilt is in very nice condition, with excellent grip wire. There is some movement in the hilt, as the fabric or leather washer has gone.

£195 + P&P NEW

OTHER SWORDS AND WEAPONS FOR SALE
New items coming  
EA5075 - An extremely unusual marriage between a French M1767 infantry hanger hilt and a non-European blade. The M1767 hilt is not commonly encountered and is a nice find by itself, but the real gem here is the blade, which features a maker's stamp and may possibly be wootz. I cannot easily place this blade at all - you find interupted fullers of this style on Indo-Persian blades sometimes,  but the overall shape of this blade is not particularly like Indo-Persian swords. Of course it is possible that it was made specifically to order for a European, but I feel that it must have been taken from a native sword, somewhere in the French Empire. Perhaps even South-East Asia, though it could equally be from North Africa. A real puzzle! The blade has light pitting and while the hilt is in nice condition generally, it is unfortunately quite loose on the hilt - I think this could be remedied if desired, by someone who knows how to tighten peened hilts.

£350 + P&P

RESTORATION SALES - NEEDING MORE ATTENTION THAN AVERAGE. PRICED TO MOVE
New items coming  
   

PREVIOUSLY SOLD ITEMS ARCHIVE
EA5086 - A wonderful 1796 pattern light cavalry sabre by Osborn. As Osborn became Osborn & Gunby in 1808, we can say that this example predates that and Osborn was one of the top makers of the day, playing a part in making the first 1796 patterns with John Gaspard Le Marchant. This is a wonderful example, with bright metal work, the blade in particular being immaculate. The blade is firm in the hilt and there is only a very small bit of movement to the guard. The leather of the grip has gone unfortunately, though from the wear and colour of the wood, it seems likely that this happened a long time ago, while the sword was still in service. There is a little, but stable, crack in the wood near the pommel - this would benefit from some discrete glue to prevent it getting worse with handling. The hilt parts and scabbard are also in great, bright condition. A lovely example of the pattern.

SOLD
EA5085 - A nice officer's private-purchase version of a 1796 pattern light cavalry sabre, with decorated blade. The blade has some very light pitting, but most of the hand-engraved decoration is still visible, including George III's cypher and the royal coat of arms. There is no maker's name visible. The hilt is complete and in overall good condition, with matching light pitting to the iron parts. The grip retains nearly all of the leather and all of the silver grip wire. The hilt assembly is all quite solid, though as per usual with this pattern, there is a little movement in the guard. The leather washer is still partially there. The scabbard is complete, but rather pitted. This example is a bit lighter than average and feels great in the hand.

SOLD
EA5084 - An unusual variant of the 1796 pattern light cavalry sabre by Runkell. A private-purchase example, probably for an officer. The blade is of standard form and plain, in bright finish and good condition. It is tight in the hilt, with the very smallest amount of movement in the guard. The grip retains 90% of the leather and all of the silver grip wire. The shape of the hilt is slightly different to normal, with a straighter knucklebow, side-bar for the sword knot and no side-ears to the backstrap. One ring and the throat is missing from the scabbard, but the wood liners are still inside and it sheathes well. Everything is tight and this feels great in the hand.

SOLD
EA5080 - A British artillery or cavalry officer's sword, with blade highly polished blade. We can say that this sword dates to after 1895, due to the style of the backstrap, but it's difficult to date more precisely due to the lack of decoration on the blade. It is probably from around 1895-1910. The blade is in absolutely superb condition, with a very high level of polish remaining. The scabbard and guard have a few patches of superficial surface rust, which can be easily cleaned off. The shagreen and wire grip is great. Everything is firm and tight.

SOLD
EA5088 - A mid to late-Victorian Rifles officer's sword, retailed by Silver of London and made by Edward Thurkle, with field service scabbard. This sword is actually in pretty good condition, but it does need cleaning - primarily on the steel parts of the hilt, which are covered in light rust. The blade is bright and in good condition, having been covered in some kind of varnish, I believe. This needs cleaning, but is in good shape under the grime. The blade is solid in the hilt and seems to have been service sharpened, though is no longer sharp. The shagreen and grip wire are in very good condition and all firm. The scabbard could do with some leather feed, but is also in good shape. This sword is fundamentally completely sound and should clean up very well with some simple work.

SOLD
EA5087 - A very clean example of a mid-Victorian infantry officer's sword, by Wilkinson. This sword, numberred 21263 (for 1876), is unresearched and in overall great condition with its scabbard. The blade is very very good, bright and with original polish, contrasting the mirror and frost finishes to the etching. The detail of the etching is very crisp and almost like new. The blade is firm in the hilt, though there is a little wiggle to the guard, which has taken a bash at some point and has a relatively minor dent. Other than this, the guard is in good condition and there is the remnant of a leather liner remaining to the inside of the guard at the junction with the pommel. The backstrap and grip are great, with 100% of the shagreen and extra-twist gilt grip wire remaining. This is a sword of the top quality of the day, in very clean condition and with research potential.

SOLD
EA5083 - A lovely 1796 pattern light cavalry trooper's sabre, by Woolley & Deakin, together with its matching scabbard. This sword is all complete and in good condition for over 200 years old. The blade is mostly bright, there is only a tiny amount of movement in the guard if you really look for it, the leather washer is still in place and the hilt is all solid. There is a little bit of loss to the leather on the grip, but a surprising amount remaining and it is firm on the wood. A great example.

SOLD
EA5081 - A rare 1895 pattern infantry officer's sword by Manton. Manton were a top supplier of equipment, most famously guns and swords, who started business in Calcutta and later opened an office in London. The 1895 pattern was only produced for 2 years and this example is proudly marked to Manton and as 'Made and Proved in India'. That is significant because the India Arms Act of 1878 had made the import of weapons a particular nuisance in India and Manton were proud of their own Indian-based business. The sword is in overall quite good condition, but needing some cleaning up. The blade is mostly bright and the etching is clear - it would benefit from some buffing though. The blade is unusually plain in decoration and also broader than normal for an 1892 type blade, increasing the cutting capacity slightly. Everything is solid and tight in the hilt. The guard has some bubbling to the nickel plating, but this could be improved. The shagreen and grip wire is good and the India service scabbard is in nice condition. It even has the original field service sword knot attached.

SOLD
EA5082 - A gorgeous Wilkinson infantry officer's sword. Numbered 11694 and dating to 1861, this sword is unresearched and holds a possible enigma, in that is has the strung horn emblem (usually associated with Rifles or Light Infantry) on the blade. The emblem is normally only found on steel-hilted Rifles swords. The overall condition is very good, with a bright clean blade, just a few spots of pitting and a few dark marks, and deep crisp detailed etching. The hilt is basically perfect, all the brass being in good shape and the grip perfect with its extra twist wire. It fits the scabbard perfectly and the two have obviously been together since 1861. A wonderful sword, all solid and lovely in the hand - a perfect example of the pattern by the top maker of the day.

SOLD
EA5076 - A Royal Navy 1845 pattern cutlass, converted in 1888 to the new specification. This was originally made at the small arms factory in Enfield and carried the War Department approval stamp, but in the 1880s huge numbers of these were converted to the slightly shorter blade with a more tapered point. This has a Birmingham approval stamp, which is presumably where the conversion was carried out. The brass plate on the front of the guard carried a rack number and this was probably stored on a Royal Navy ship. Much of the original black paint remains to the hilt, though damp has lifted some off. The blade is in nice condition and everything is solid.

SOLD
EA5058 - A lovely French M1816 cuirassier's pallasch, with huge 39 inch blade featuring double fullers. This is a very clean example, its only notable flaw being the loss of the grip wire. Otherwise it is in great condition. The blade is bright, straight and firm in the hilt. The massive 3-branch brass guard is in good shape and clean. The leather of the grip is all remaining, if a little dry. The scabbard fits perfectly and has relatively minor patina for the age. It has all the expected arsenal stamps and the engraving on the spine of the blade seems to indicate manufacture at Klingenthal in 1828.

SOLD
EA5069 - A good quality late-Victorian light cavalry officer's sword by Pillin. This is a really nicely constructed example by one of the best makers of the day, probably dating to around 1880-1895. The blade has a fair amount of patina which has made the etching rather faded, but it is functionally completely sound and solid in the hilt. The hilt is in overall nice condition, with the shagreen and grip wire in a good state. The scabbard is present and would benefit from a clean. A nice sword in the hand.

SOLD
EA5073 - A French M1882 infantry officer's sword, probably from around WW1. All the components of this sword are basically fine and the St. Etienne maker's mark is partially visible on the blade. However, the hilt is really loose, so it needs tightening up (ideally it needs dismounting and remounting, to fix the grip wire are well). The scabbard has a slight bend, though this doesn't affect the sword sheathing. Priced as a project, though it could be displayed as is.

SOLD
EA5079 - A Rifles Volunteer officer's sword, marked to the West Middlesex Rifles, and with the officer's initials and family crest. Unfortunately I have been unable to identify the officer in question, but that should make a fun bit of research for the buyer. The sword is marked to retailer Carter, but was probably made by Reeves around 1860. The blade is in very nice condition, with original mirror polish contrasting against the frost etching, which is deep and crisp. The hilt is overall in decent condition, though would benefit from a clean up and the grip wire is somewhat loose. The patina and fit of the scabbard shows that these belong together and it sheaths well. Curiously for a volunteers sword, it appears that the blade may have been service sharpened during its service life - it could be that the officer only spent a brief time in the volunteers before joining the regular Army (something I have seen before in researching swords). There is a tiny bit of movement in the wooden grip, but you hear it rather than feel it.

SOLD
EA5074 - A mid-18th century Continental European hunting hanger in the Polish karabela style, perhaps French. Dating to the middle decades of the 1700s, this 52cm-bladed hunting hanger is a very pleasing sidearm, which would have been carried while hunting, to deliver the coup de grace, but possibly also as a travelling/self defence weapon. The blade has some light pitting, but is in generally nice condition and solid in the hilt. The grip is made of ebony and the hilt fittings are iron/steel.

SOLD
EA5077 - A 1796 pattern infantry officer's spadroon of superior quality. The blade of this spadroon features the remains of blue and gilt decoration, with some of the gilding remaining, as well as extensive acid etched motifs, which are still clear and go a long way up the blade beyond the blued area. The blade is in nice condition and solid in the hilt. The hilt overall is in good condition, in good shape and the folding drop fully functioning. The double-shell guard is rather loose, due to the loss of the leather washer (which could be reinstated fairly easily, using a split washer), but the rest of the hilt is tight and secure. This was the regulation sword carried by the majority of British infantry officers through the Napoleonic Wars from 1796 and up until 1822.

SOLD
EA5078 - A British light cavalry officer's sword, by Pillin, circa 1870-1890. This sword has been placed in the restoration section purely because it has a bit more rust on the hilt than I would normally list for sale. However, overall it's in pretty good condition and is an easy restoration job, requiring just a few hours with steel wool, oil and Autosol, at most. The blade is in good bright condition and firm in the hilt - it has been service sharpened. There are a few light patches of surface rust in localised spots, but these will come off easily. The hilt has lost most of the nickel plating and has active rust bloom, which needs cleaning off, as mentioned. The shagreen has a little loss from wear, but the grip wire and scabbard are all good. A decent sword by one of the top makers.

SOLD
EA5072 - A French M1831 artillery sidearm ('cabbage chopper'/ 'coupe choux') with Paris maker's stamp and poincion proof. A nice example, everything solid and with minimal pitting and pleasing patina.

SOLD
EA5071 - A 19th century Belgian court/smallsword, featuring the Belgian royal coat of arms and having a functional blade and mother of pearl grips. This model of sword is based on French examples and dates to after 1837, when the Belgian coat of arms and motto 'l'Union Fait La Force', as featured on the guard, was officially adopted. The hilt has been configured for a left-handed person, interestingly and unusually. The blade is a simple but totally effective hollow-ground triangular smallsword blade, which is solid in the hilt. The ornate gilded guard is in nice condition overally, though there is a little crack in the knucklebow - this seems stable though and should not deteriorate if the sword is well looked after. The mother of pearl grips are secure and in good condition.

SOLD
EA5068 - A rare Hong Kong Police (mounted police) cavalry sword, dating to the late-19th century. I have never seen one of these before and they must be rare survivors outside Hong Kong. As can be seen from the photo below, from around 1885, the Hong Kong Police had a mounted contingent which was armed and equipped like a cavalry troop. The sword itself is in nice condition, with the original field service scabbard. The blade is bright and is marked to the outfitter Parker, Field & Son, who supplied the military and police. The blade is unsharpened and is solid in the hilt. The metal parts of the hilt were painted gold when the sword came to me (probably used as a stage prop), so I have removed most of the paint, though further cleaning would bring up the hilt better. It is evident that the hilt was originally nickel plated and patches of this remain. The shagreen and wire grip is in nice condition. Overall, a very rare sword with a fascinating history, and a nice quality sword in its own right.

SOLD

EA5070 - A mid-Victorian Rifles officer's sword, retailed by Prater (perhaps made by Reeves). This example has a lovely bright clean blade, with really detailed and crisp etching. The metal of the hilt and scabbard show original browning (to reduce glare, match the dark fittings of the Rifles uniform and inhibit rust) - these are fundamentally in good condition, but would benefit from careful cleaning to remove a little light rust residue here and there. The shagreen and grip wire is quite good, with a small split in the shagreen near the pommel. Everything seems solid.

SOLD
EA5067 -  A good clean example of an early to mid-Victorian cavalry officer's sword, retailed by Hamburger, Rogers & Co and possibly made by Reeves. Everything about this sword is tidy, including the bright well-etched blade, the guard and backstrap with matching blue-grey patina to the blade and the bright scabbard. The shagreen and wire of the grip is in very good condition. Everything is solid. This sword probably dates to around the 1850s or 60s.

SOLD
EA5066 - A great example of a Victorian Warrant Officer or Master at Arms sword, by great maker Edward Thurkle. These swords are much less common than the officer's swords and feature a plain rounded pommel and backstrap, instead of the lion head, as well as having dark shagreen on the grip instead of white. This example dates to the 1870s or 1880s based on the maker's inscription. The blade is bright, with clear etching. The brass of the hilt is clean and in good shape. The shagreen and grip wire are all present and correct. The scabbard is all complete and in fairly good condition. Everything is solid and the guard drop works perfectly. Overall, a lovely example of the type and not often encountered, especially not from a good maker like this example.

SOLD
EA5033 - A 1908 pattern cavalry sword. This example is in untouched and genuine condition, even with the period camouflage paint remaining to the guard. There are some bits of rust here and there which need cleaning up and the blade would benefit from a gentle clean. Everything is in good shape and the hilt is firm on the tang. The composition grip is in great condition and the chequering still nice and defined. The leather washer is still in place - though sadly lacking a scabbard, you can buy modern replacements for these and spare originals are not rare.

SOLD
EA5030 - An 1821 pattern light cavalry trooper's sword. This is the type of sword carried by light cavalry from the 1820s until it was replaced in 1854 and the next few years by the 1853 pattern. Roughly half of the cavalry during the Crimean War were armed with these and they were still numerous during the Indian Mutiny in 1857-58. This example is in reasonable condition, but missing its scabbard. The blade is in fairly good shape with a little pitting here and there. It is solid in the hilt and everything is tight. The leather is mostly remaining to the grip and the bars of the guard are in good shape.

SOLD
EA5065 - A rare Wilkinson private purchase cutlass. I have only owned two of these and seen one other, and it is unclear who they were made for, or for what purpose. The previous example I owned was not sharpened - this one has been. The blade is bring and in lovely condition, clearly etched to Wilkinson of Pall Mall. The guard and backstrap are brass, though with heavy patina (which could be cleaned to bright brass if desired). The leather of the grip and the scabbard is rather dry - I have applied Dubbin, but it would benefit from further feeding. The chape of the scabbard needs glueing, as it drops off when you draw the sword. Everything is pretty firm in the hilt, though there is a very tiny movement to the backstrap - though when you're holding it you do not notice. Possible explanations for what these cutlasses were include for sword feats (cutting practice) or for arming private yachts, which were expecting to pass through dangerous waters. It probably dates to around 1870-1900.

SOLD
EA5062 - A Solingen-made British 1853 pattern cavalry trooper's sword, with regimental markings. This example is in reasonable condition - the blade is fairly clean, with light patina. The guard is one of the thicker sorts and in good shape. The leather grip scales are in nice condition, with clear chequering. The grip scales are secure, but there is a tiny amount of movement where the leather has dried around the tang rivets (you don't notice when you grip it really). The leather washer is still in place and the (unidentified) regimental markings on the guard exactly match those on the scabbard. The scabbard is rather pitted from rust and has been painted black, so that could be improved, but we know it matches the sword and it sheathes well.

SOLD
EA5039 - A very rare and desirable Osborn & Gunby variant of the 1796 light cavalry officer's sword. This variant is fairly famous in the development of British military swords, as it was an attempt (rather successful I would say) to creat a sword with something close to the lightness and cutting power of the 1796 light cavalry sabre, but adapted to be more effective at 'giving point'. The result is a double-fullered, stiffer blade, with a point which harks back to earlier falchions. The blade on this example is good, though dark with patina - the engraved decoration is still fairly clear in some parts and faint in others. There is some light pitting here and there, but the blade is straight and structurally sound, with a good edge. The hilt and blade would benefit from careful or professional restoration, but other than light cleaning I have left them original and untouched. The hilt is a little loose on the tang, due I suspect to the loss of the leather washer. A professional restorer could rectify this and it would be worth the expense in the long run. The grip is in fairly good shape for the age, with most of the leather covering to the wood remaining and most of the grip wire. This is a fabulous sword in the hand, a very sought-after model and incredibly hard to find these days. This is only the second I have ever managed to procure.

SOLD (H)

EA5025 - A very rare and desirable East India Company 4th Bombay Rifles officer's sword, pre-dating the Persian campaign of 1860. The sword was made/retailed by Hart, who seem to have specialied in swords for Indian service. The blade features fantastic etching with battle honours for the 4th Bombay Rifles, including "Seringartam", "Beni Boo Ali", "Bourbon", "Punjab" and "Mooltan". In 1861 the regiment added "Persia" to their battle honours, so this sword must pre-date that - it also features the East India Company lion, so it presumably dates to before 1858. The sword has been service-sharpened and must have seen a fascinating bit of history. While it may not be possible to attribute it to one particular officer, there are literally only a handful of possible candidates in the India Army List who are likely to have carried this sword. The sword came with a period train ticket attached to it (pictured), which may possibly offer the hope of narrowing down the original owner. I only know of two other 4th Bengal Rifles swords and they are both in the private collections of people I know. The sword itself is in reasonably good condition, but shows clear signs of hard campaigning - most notably the wear to the grip, where there is some loss to the shagreen and grip wire. This likely dates to the period of the sword's service and corresponds to the areas of the grip which get most worn when gripping it. The guard and scabbard are fairly dark from patina, but the blade is really very good, with the etching all clear and crisp and the service sharpening having been well executed. The sword sheaths perfectly in the scabbard and the blade is tight in the hilt. A rare opportunity to get hold of a well attributed Indian Army regimental officer's sword, from the period of the Mutiny and Persian campaign.

SOLD
EA5034 - An extremely rare Royal Dockyard Battalion officer's sword, by Wilkinson and pre-1854! Royal Dockyard Battalion officer's swords are rare by themselves, but to find one that also happens to be a pre-numbered (1846-1853) Wilkinson makes it a rare gem indeed. The sword is in reasonable condition, with patina to the blade and a few localised areas of pitting - however nearly all of the intricate etching remains clear. Curiously, the blade has been well service sharpened. This could associate the sword with some very interesting campaigns, given it's dating - perhaps Crimean War related. The blade is fim in the hilt and the hilt is in very good condition, with a lot of the gilt wash remaining on the brass. The shagreen and grip wire is good and the guard drop (flap) works well. The sword knot is a modern replacement, but is the correct knot I believe. The scabbard fits the sword well, but I cannot honestly say whether it is the original one for this sword or not - usually 1846 pattern naval officer's swords have leather and brass scabbards, but Royal Dockyard Battalion from around 1850, I simply don't know. A lovely sword - the best quality of the day - and extremely rare.

SOLD
EA5054 - A steel-hilted double-edged early smallsword, probably of around 1680-1710. This is a simple utilitarian example, with chiselled steel/iron fittings. The grip is bound with copper wire and turks heads. Everything is solid and tight with no movement and the blade is in nice clean condition. Even patina overall. Some pitting to the hilt elements, but for the age quite good.

SOLD
EA5051 - A post-WW1 Royal Army Medical Corps (RAMC) officer's sword by Wilkinson. This sword is numbered, but I have not researched it - I believe it dates to about 1920. The blade is in good condition, with the RAMC emblem clearly etched. It bears the hexagonal 'best quality' proof slug, meaning that the officer paid extra for the blade to be double-tested and extra etching applied. This sword should clean up great, but currently the scabbard carries superficial surface rust and the nickel plating of the guard and backstrap have suffered from damp. These should all polish up quite well with some work. The shagreen has shrunk a little on one side, probably also due to damp. Everything is solid and tight.

SOLD
EA5064 - An attractive and tidy example of a WW1-era Rifles officer's sword, by Gaunt using the Edward Thurkle trademark (see article). The blade is lovely and clean, though the etching is faint in areas. The blade is firm in the hilt and has been service sharpened on both edges near the tip (presumably for WW1). The hilt is in great condition, with a bright polished steel guard, great condition shagreen and all the silver grip wire present. The scabbard has lost some of the nickel plating, but is otherwise in nice condition and fits the sword perfectly.

SOLD
EA5035 - A gorgeous Wilkinson heavy cavalry officer's sword for an officer of the Scots Greys, with the officer's initials and crest etched on the blade. The Wilkinson proof book records this sword as having been purchased by P. S. Coxe for W. Johnstone Esq. in November 1866. This was actually Walter Johnson of the famous 2nd Royal Dragoons, the Scots Greys (P. S. Coxe being his step-father). The sword itself is in really fantastic condition, with a bright blade, almost perfect, featuring crisp etching and totally solid in the hilt. The hilt is similarly in fantastic condition, with the shagreen in great shape and only one strand of silver grip wire missing. The scabbard is also in good condition, though is of slightly later style (after Johnson retired from the Army), so I believe this sword could have been sold to a fellow officer and continued to be carried afterwards. A stunning sword, fantastic in the hand and really museum grade, to an officer of one of the most famous cavalry regiments in the British Army.

SOLD
EA5049 - A bare Wilkinson officer's blade 32.5 inches by 1 inch (not including tang). This blade is in lovely original polish, is numbered and has the officer's initials (seem to be CCR). The blade has been well service sharpened and has a few very tiny nicks/burrs. I bought this blade to re-hilt, but never got round to it - mounted up it would be a lovely piece and with the number and initials it has some interesting research potential. It seems from the decoration on the blade to have been for a Rifles officer, so could be happily married up to a Rifles hilt.

SOLD
EA5057 - A scarce sabre by Woolley, Sargant & Fairfax (1826-34). The blade of this is clearly based on the 1796 light cavalry sabre and the hilt is based on a type of foot artillery hanger from around 1800, so it's possible that these were made for artillery gunners, or perhaps horse artillery. These are scarce enough that nobody seems to have found out exactly who they were made for. The resulting sword is really nice in the hand and well made. The iron grip brings the point of balance a bit back towards the hand, compared to a 1796. The blade is dark with patina and has some very light pitting in the foible - it could be cleaned up quite easily if desired. The brass knucklebow is in good shape and solid and the entire hilt construction is firm on the tang. At the end of the 19th century (1896) this model of sword was emulated for British and Indian mountain artillery (also sometimes carried by Indian cavalry), but from the maker's name on the blade this is obviously much earlier.

SOLD
EA5040 - A nice mid-Victorian light cavalry officer's sword by William Buckmaster of London. Buckmaster's swords were known for their very high quality blade etching and the detail can bee seen clearly on this sword. The service-sharpened blade is in nice condition, bright and with crisp etching, with a few very tiny nicks to the edge. The blade is solid in the hilt. The guard and scabbard have brownish patina, which may indicate that they were originally browned anyway, but these could be cleaned up further quite easily. The shagreen has suffered a little from age, but only has a little bit of loss (probably from actual service life, given the areas of wear). The copper grip wire is in very good shape. A nice tidy sword of good quality, which would reward some further work.

SOLD
EA5024 - A lovely mid-19th century Royal Artillery officer's sword retailed by Millan and Mann of Edinburgh. I have left this sword as found, so it could benefit from some further gentle cleaning (particularly around the guard), but it is fundamentally in very good condition, with a superb blade. The blade shows fantastic original mirror polish, contrasting with frost etching. There are only very minor blemishes and overall it is a stunning blade. Given the etching style and proof slug, I suspect that this was made by Reeves in Birmingham and sold to Millan and Mann. The latter were retailers and seem to have closed in 1867, which tallies with my opinion that this sword dates to around the 1850s or early-60s. The blade has been cleanly service sharpened, so may have been on campaign in this period. The scabbard is rather pitted, but sound, and fits like a glove, which coupled with the presence of the original leather washer is why the blade is still in such good original condition. The blade is solid in the hilt and the latter is in very nice condition, with all the shagreen and grip wire in place and complete. This sword feels lovely in the hand and is a very well made example from an interesting period. One final detail to note is that it has a chequered pommel end, which is normally limited to cavalry swords, but here clearly seen on an Artillery officer's sword (putting pay to claims that chequered pommels indicate cavalry).

SOLD
EA5050 - A WW1 era George V Rifles officer's piquet weight sword and scabbard. This sword actually doesn't need much restoration really - it just has superficial surface rust to the guard, backstrap and scabbard. The blade is in nice clean condition with clear etching and the Army & Navy supplier's name and address to the ricasso. The blade is solid in the hilt. Should clean up very well.

SOLD
EA5052 - A good quality 19th century Indian tulwar. This tulwar has a nice big robust blade, with crisply defined edge-bevel and wedge-sectioned. The steel hilt is attractively carved with floral decoration and it nicely sized for modern hands. There is a tiny amount of movement between hilt and tang, but very minimal. The hilt is pinned laterally, rather than simply being glued to the tang, which may indicate a Northern Indian origin. The blade is in nice condition, but would benefit from proper cleaning (it came to me covered in varnish, which had protected it, but was difficult to remove).

SOLD
EA5059 - A unique little naval-style hanger or cutlass, named. It's hard to say exactly what service this was for, or if it was simply for a civilian. To me it looks naval and it could perhaps have been for a Merchant Navy or private shipping officer or official. The person, whoever they were, was called William Hatley Bacon, as etched on the blade. I have tried to find this person, but drew a blank - maybe you can have better results. The blade is mostly bright and the etching is clear. The hilt is firm on the tang, with only a very small wiggle to the guard - the leather washer is still in place. The shagreen and wire of the grip are in nice order. The scabbard is complete, though the metal fittings could do with securing, as their old glue has ceased working on the dried out leather, which needs rehydrating/feeding. The sword sheathes well and overall is a very pleasing little sidearm, with research potential. It should clean up very well with relatively little effort.

SOLD
EA5048 - A late-Victorian Rifles officer's sword, from 1892-1901. This looks very presentable and is not per se a restoration piece at first sight. However, I have to be honest about this sword in that it came to be with a notable bend at the end of the blade - I tried straightening it, only to find that the foible of the blade is totally soft. It has lost all its spring. So the blade is now straight, but I would not feel honest not mentioning this obvious flaw. I suspect that this has been caused by the sword being used as a fire poker! If you want something to hang on the wall, swing around or use for spae parts even, then this may suit you perfectly. The hilt is in very nice condition and the tang nut screws on and off easily, allowing the parts to be dismounted without much effort.

SOLD
EA5045 - A Chinese Dadao - Probably Boxer Rebellion (c.1900) bring back. This is a big heavy sword, in need of a lot of work, but all complete, even with scabbard. The guard is loose, the grip cord has gone.

SOLD
EA5043 - An Indian tulwar of unknown age. Could be WW1 era, could be much more recent. Blade solid in hilt.

SOLD
EA5002 - A fabulous 31st (Duke of Connaught's Own) Lancers officer's sword, in great condition and etched with the battle honours of the regiment. This is a very rare sword and made by top firm Gaunt & Son, who took over Edward Thurkle's business after 1897. The blade is marked GRI (George V's Imperial Indian cypher) and given that the blade has been well service sharpened and the regiment was no longer the 31st after 1923, I feel confident in saying that this sword saw service in the Afghanistan campaign of 1919. This is a top quality sword, in very good condition, service sharpened and marked to a fascinating and illustrious regiment.

SOLD
EA5063 - A Royal Artillery officer's sword, retailed by Hobson and made by Pillin, circa 1900. The blade on this sword is bright and clean, as well as being solid in the hilt. It has been well service sharpened - the entire edge bevel being expertly re-angled so that there is no secondary bevel. The hilt is all solid and in generally good condition, except that there is light surface rust to the guard and backstrap, which require cleaning, and the grip wire is gone completely. The shagreen is good and the leather washer is present. The field service scabbard is in fairly good order. This is a handy sword of nice proportions and good quality, with a nice edge.

SOLD
EA5061 - A curious version of the 1853 pattern cavalry sword, perhaps private or contract purchase. This is, at first sight, a regular 1853 pattern trooper's sword. However, it has a more slender grip, a more detailed guard and a slightly different scabbard. I cannot see any markings on it anywhere. It is possible that this is simply an example made either abroad on contract (for example in Solingen) or made in Britain for export to another country. It is not like some of the Indian Army versions, as this is full size with a 35 inch blade and normal length grip. The other possibility is that this was a private purchase version, perhaps for yeomanry - I must say that it handles more nimbly and is of slightly better construction quality than most of the government contract 1853 patterns.

SOLD
EA5060 - A WW1 era Wilkinson 'best quality' (hexagonal proof) infantry officer's sword, 1897 pattern. This sword has all the usual Wilkinson markings and is numbered, but unusually it also has the India Stores marking and the date 1918, so presumably it was ordered through government channels rather than personally. The etching also features GRI instead of GvR, indicating an officer of the Indian Army. Everything is solid, the blade is great, crisp etching, firm in the hilt. The guard and scabbard could do with some light cleaning, but overall this is a very tidy sword in the best quality of the day. This could be cleaned up to serve as a modern officer's sword, as it meets current regulation for British Army infantry officers and is way better quality than you can get from modern made examples (which cost much more!).

SOLD
EA5056 - An 1845 pattern Royal Navy cutlass, with Enfield proof stamp and also Enfield 1848 stamped on the spine. This is in lovely condition, with a bright, clean blade, solid in the hilt. The blade is the full 29 inch length. The outside of the guard has been cleaned, but the inside of the guard and the grip retain the original black paint finish. The leather washer is still in place. This has obviously been kept as a pair with the other similar cutlass listed here and shares the same proof stamp (as well as the additional Enfield and date on the spine of the blade).

SOLD
EA5055 - An 1845 pattern Royal Navy cutlass, with Enfield proof stamp. This is in lovely condition, with a bright, clean blade, solid in the hilt. The blade is the full 29 inch length. The outside of the guard has been cleaned, but the inside of the guard and the grip retain the original black paint finish. The leather washer is still in place. This has obviously been kept as a pair with the other similar cutlass listed here and shares the same proof stamp.

SOLD
EA5065 - A Victorian Artillery Volunteers officer's sword, retailed by Hannington & Sons of Brighton. This is only marginally being classed as a restoration piece, because it's actually in pretty good condition, but there is light surface rust to the hilt and scabbard which should be cleaned off (an easy job). The blade and grip are in nice condition and everything seems firm.

SOLD
EA5053 - A WW1 Sheffield-made infantry officer's sword. Sheffield picked up extra demand for officer's swords in WW1, but these were made according to wartime contingencies, so leather grip instead of shagreen, slightly heavier blades etc. This example is in fairly decent condition, but does need some work - the guard and backstrap are grubby and need a buff. The blade has some superficial bits of surface rust. An easy restoration.

SOLD
EA5047 - A rusty 1845 pattern infantry officer's sword by Pillin, from around 1880. This is a good quality sword, which unfortunately looks like it's been stored in a garden shed! It's interesting for having the strung bugle of the Rifles/light infantry on the guard instead of the usual VR. The wire is loose (could simply remove), the brass is all in good shape, but covered in oxide which needs cleaning off. The blade has been nickel plated and rust has got under this, making it flake off over 50% of the blade. This being said, the blade looks in pretty good shape and with rust remover should clean up well - the etching is easy to see still. The shagreen looks pretty good and the whole sword is solid. It even has the original sword knot. Properly restored, this could be a really nice sword.

SOLD
EA5046 - A rusty 1845 pattern infantry officer's sword, from 1845-1860. Lots of issues with this one and a real project! Rusty blade and scabbard, all the shagreen lost from the grip, the grip slightly split and the whole hilt loose on the tang. The brass is in good shape and the folding drop works perfectly. Steel actually looks okay under the surface rust and the narrow blade has been well service sharpened.

SOLD
EA5044 - An interesting Afghan dagger, with a forward-curved blade, of pesh-kabz type construction. Horn grip, all secure. Should clean up well.

SOLD
EA5013 - An Indian sosun pattah of the 18th or 19th century. This is a simply utilitarian example of the type, but these straight or forwards-curved Indian swords do not come around very often. The blade is on the front slightly concave edge and is mounted in a tulwar type hilt of probably Northern Indian Islamic form. The whole sword is in need of some restoration, but I have left it as found. The blade is solid in the hilt, with all the pitch remaining to secure it there. The blade is overall straight, but does have some wiggles when you look along the edge or back (I guess that it is edge-quenched and these could be removed with a little effort).

SOLD
EA5028 - A late Victorian (1895-1901) Royal Artillery officer's sword made by Pillin. This sword shows quite a bit of light pitting from having been rusty and then cleaned and is missing its scabbard. Despite this, it is all solid, there is still quite a lot of etching visible to the blade and it is structurally sound. The shagreen and silver grip wire is in fairly good shape and the hilt is all tight. Priced according to condition, but basically a good quality sword.

SOLD
EA5032 - A highly unusual George V period Army Service Corps officer's sword by Fenton of Sheffield. Army Service Corps officer's swords are pretty rare, but this one is even more so due to the unusual arrangement of very beefy blade (well service-sharpened), alloy cast guard and backstrap, and white shagreen grip. The grip is in lovely condition with very large nodules on the shark skin, similar to some naval officer's swords. The hilt is all totally solid on the tang. The blade has some patina which might be worth cleaning a little, but is in mostly bright and clean condition, with very detailed and crisp etching. I assume that this sword dates to WW1 and it comes in the perfectly fitting field service scabbard. A highly unusual sword.

SOLD
EA5042 - French 1822 pattern light cavalry trooper's sword. This is a nice example, all complete and solid. The blade is very clean and bright, solid in the hilt and with good visible stamps. There was clearly a maker's engraving on the spine, but this has been cleaned off unfortunately. The hilt is in good shape, clean and bright. The leather of the grip is intact and the grip wire is present, though does move around a bit. The wire is unusually thick, but looks completely original to me. The scabbard is also present and in good shape, with perfect fit on the blade.

SOLD
A rare light cavalry sword, probably made under British contract for the Indian Army, probably during or around the time of the Indian Mutiny. This model of sword turns up in the UK rarely and it is likely that most were made in Solingen, Germany, under British contract to equip loyal or hastily-raised cavalry troops during and after the Mutiny of 1857-58. The blades are basically the same as the 1821 pattern light cavalry officer's sword, featuring a pipe-backed blade and narrow quill-point. The hilts are similar to the 1821 pattern, but feature a sprung folding section on the inner guard, to make them more comfortable/convenient to wear. The grips are leather-covered wood. The backstraps are plain, with a rounded pommel. This example is in reasonable condition - it is structurally sound, with everything tight and the spring still functioning perfectly on the guard. It does however have light pitting all over and some small bits of loss to the leather on the grip. A rare sword which is part of the emerging story of British Indian army swords during and after the Indian Mutiny. This example has been service sharpened and retains a relatively sharp edge - it very well could have been carried during the Mutiny.

SOLD
EA5029 - A scarce 1895 pattern Victorian infantry officer's sword by top maker Robert Mole of Birmingham. This sword overall is in nice condition, with some cosmetic issues - there is some light pitting on some parts of the blade, in the second half of the blade, and there are a hanful of little edge nicks to the service-sharpened cutting edge. Other than this, it is all nice - the blade is bright with deep crisp etching, the blade is solid in the hilt, the guard is in very nice condition, as is the shagreen and grip wire. The scabbard fits very well and matched the sword. With some gentle cleaning this would be a great (and nicely service-sharpened) example of the pattern, which was only produced for two years 1895-96.

SOLD
EA5041 - A great example of an 1845 pattern Royal Navy cutlass, marked with the Board of Ordnance (BO) stamp and therefore dating to 1845-1854. This example has Enfield small arms factory markings and proof/acceptance stamps. The cutlass has had the hilt tightened at the tang peen in recent times (properly done) and the blade edge, which was originally service sharpened anyway, has been restored to a full sharp edge. This has been descretely done as part of restoration, as this cutlass was originally rusty and in a poor overall state. There is original black paint remaining to the hilt and pleasing salt and pepper patina to all the metal parts, with minimal pitting. Everything is rock solid on this cutlass and it rings like a bell - it is essentially ready to use. This features the full length 1845 blade (29 inches), not the shortened 1859 version. A great piece - these cutlasses feel awesome in the hand and cut just as well as any medieval sword.

SOLD
EA5015 - An Indian tulwar of classic form, probably 19th century, with scabbard. The blade of this tulwar is in great condition, bright, springy and sharp. It is solid in the hilt. The hilt is equally in nice condition and although the scabbard is rather worse for wear, it is relatively unusual to get tulwars with scabbards at all, and it has done a great job of protecting the blade. The hilt is a decent size and can fit my hand fairly comfortably. This is a good example of the type of tulwar that many professional soldiers in India would have had throughout the 19th century and in good condition.

SOLD
EA5036 - A lovely Wilkinson light cavalry sword, to an identified officer of the 5th Lancers. This sword's record on the Wilkinson proof book unfortunately recorded no name, but in the end it didn't matter because the etching on the blade had 5 initials (RBPWM) and together with the date of the sword (1876), this made matching it to the officer quite easy. Count Richard Bethell Parkyns Warmingham Metaxa originally commissioned into the 74th Highlanders in 1874, but decided to transfer in 1876 to the 5th Royal Irish Lancers. This meant buying a new pattern of sword and this is that sword. Metaxa himself was descended from aristocracy originating in Corfu, but was English on his mother's side. Sadly, he only lived to 36, passing away in 1888. The sword is in great condition overall, with some light corrosion to the hilt. The blade is in very good condition, with a little damp damage on a few small spots of the etching and a little patch of pitting near the tip. However, it is bright, with a lot of the original polish remaining, showing the wonderful contrast between mirror polish and frost etching. The blade is solid in the hilt. The shagreen and silver grip wire are in good condition. This is a very nice sword of the top quality of the day - as you would expect to be owned by a Count! The hilt and scabbard would respond well to further gentle restoration.

SOLD
EA5038 - A very nice 1796 pattern light cavalry trooper's sword, by Woolley & Co. I believe that this is an early example, as Woolley partnered up with Deakin in around 1800, so I believe this to be 1796-1800 in date. It is overall in great condition for the age, though unfortunately missing the scabbard. The blade is in nice shape and with miniman salt and pepper patina and just very light pitting. The hilt is also in very good shape and remarkably the grip leather with cord underneath is very nice. The hilt does move a little on the tang, because the leather washer has considerably shrunk, although it is still there. There is some sort of regimental/armour marking on the guard and an inspection stamp on the forte of the blade. A really nice condition example of the ever-popular pattern.

SOLD
EA5026 - A Rifle Volunteers officer's sword, by Mole of Birmingham. Unfortunately missing its scabbard, it is otherwise in nice condition, bright and complete. The guard is fairly unusual in that it is cast rather than cut from steel. I presume it must be some sort of alloy and MOLE is stamped into the surface, so this was probably an experiment by the great innovators at the Mole factory, who were the biggest contractor for swords and bayonets to the War Department. The Rifle Volunteers movement had its roots in the Napoleonic Wars, but saw a huge revival from 1859 onwards, due to the perceived threat of French invasion again. Rifle Volunteers were therefore civilians who were part-time territorial reservists, with the officers usually made up of men from qualified professions or land-owning gentlemen, some of whom had been officers in the regular British Army previously. This sword has a nice clean bright blade, with clear and detailed etching. The edge is not sharpened as such, but is quite fine and at first sight appears sharpened. The guard is very pretty and nicely contoured - there is the tiniest amount of wiggle in the guard, but the hilt as a whole is basically tight on the tang. The shagreen and grip wire are in nice condition, with only a little bit of loss to the skin and one of the thin strands of wire now gone.

SOLD
EA5027 - A light cavalry officer's sword by Manton. Manton were based primarily in Calcutta, with a showroom in London also - they sold predominantly therefore to British officers serving in Indian regiments, or officers of British regiments who happened to be based in India at the time (British Army regiments rotated locations). Manton were a high quality outfitter, famous for hunting, duelling and military firearms, who primarily sourced products by other manufacturers and put their name on them by this period. It is most likely that this sword was made by Reeves of Birmingham, in my opinion, based on the etching style, quality and proof slug. Probably dating to the 1870s or 1880s, it's a great quality sword, which is in rather scrappy cosmetic condition now. This sword would suit someone who wants a good quality fighting sword, but isn't too worried about appearances! The most notable flaws are that the shagreen has been 80% worn away (by service use, I would say - I have a few swords that I know saw long service lives and feature this pattern of wear) and the blade has shallow little pitting all over the surface from rust, which has then been cleaned and buffed bright subsequently. The result of the latter is that the etching is now very faint, though you can still make out the typical decoration for a light cavalry officer's sword and the surround etch of the proof slug is still clear (and matches other Reeves swords I have). Structurally the sword is sound - the blade and hilt are solid and at some point during its service life the original round tang nut has been replaced with a period hex nut (I have seen this before and it is original - Wilkinsons actually have a hex nut under the backstrap as standard). The scabbard is present, fits perfectly and is original - the leather washer is also original and matches the scabbard. So this is a sword which probably saw a long service life and is not very pretty now. But make no mistake that this is a top quality fighting sword and feels very nice in the hand.

SOLD
EA5031 - An Indian cavalry sabre, perhaps for an Indian officer, by Mole of Birmingham. This follows the usual pattern of Indian cavalry sabre which came about in the aftermath of the Indian Mutiny, featuring a 1796-style 'Paget' pattern sabre blade, married to a compressed version of the 1821 pattern light cavalry hilt. This example has fancy shagreen and wire wrap to the grip, so is not a standard trooper's model, but it does have ISD (India Stores Depot) stamps and other government markings. So presumably it was government-purchased, for an Indian officer. The blade is in very nice condition, well service sharpened and with clear stamps. It is totally solid in the hilt. The hilt is rather pitted from rust, though this could be improved with some work. The grip shagreen and wire are very good. A nice detail is that there is a small chequered section on the backstrap for the thumb, which is unusual with this sword pattern. The blade is a very slight bend near the tip, but most people would probably not notice.

SOLD
EA5037 - A Victorian light cavalry officer's sword, in need of restoration. This has been untouched for decades and is priced for restoration. Everything seems solid. The blade has patina and very faint etching now, but have been nicely service-sharpened. The hilt and scabbard have light rust which should clean off quite easily. The shagreen is missing about 20%, but most of the grip wire is there.

SOLD
EA5008 - A Wilkinson infantry officer's sword, of 'best quality', dating to 1935. The hexagonal proof slug shows that the purchaser paid extra for more elaborate testing and etching - I have not researched this sword, but the record will survive for it and it may be an officer with WW2 service, given the date of the serial number (64797). Overall, the sword is in very good condition, though there is some minor patina to the blade and the guard - this could be easily remedied with gentle buffing. The scabbard is in nice condition as well. Everything is solid and the shagreen/grip wire are in decent condition. Would possible suit a modern serving infantry officer and MUCH better quality than the modern-made swords now being sold for parade purposes.

SOLD
A special and rare 1892 pattern infantry officer's sword, by Wilkinson and made for an interesting and high-ranking officer of the Connaught Rangers. This is a great sword, being an 1892 pattern makes is rare to start with, as they were only produced for 3 years, but it is also a top quality Wilkinson. It is in really nice condition and service sharpened, but the best part is the provenance. This sword was made for Frederick Joseph Byrne (later Colonel) as noted on the Wilkinson ledger (scan included in the sale) and the blade is etched with his initials 'F. J. B'. Byrne was born in Londonderry, Ireland, on 20 September 1873, the son of J. A. Byrne, F.R.C.S.I. He was commissioned into the 2nd Battalion Connaught Rangers on 17 December 1892, made Lieutenant in April 1894 and Captain in July 1900. He served as Adjutant from April 1902 to March 1905 and was promoted to Major in November 1911. He retired on 4 March 1914. The Connaught Rangers were not employed in India, but Byrne was one of five officers from the regiment that were attached to the Royal Irish Regiment for service on the North West Frontier of India from 1897-98 and in operations on the Samana (this presumably explains the sword being service sharpened and this was pretty certainly the sword he carried on campaign then). When WW1 started shortly after he had retired, Byrne quickly rejoined the regiment and served from August 1914 to February 1919. He was employed in the Department of the Master-General of Ordnance as Deputy Assistant Director and served in Russia. Byrne was twice mentioned in despatches, was awarded the C.M.G. in 1917 and rose to the rank of Colonel in 1919.
The sword is in good overall condition - there are some very minor nicks to the cutting edge, there is one strand of wire missing from the grip and the brass guard is a little bit bent in one area. Otherwise it is in great condition and a fantastic example of the pattern - the blade is quite bright, with minimal patina for the age and with deep crisp etching, solid in the hilt. The brass of the hilt is in good general shape and with minimal wear. The shagreen is pretty much perfect and the grip wire is 95% perfect. The scabbard has patina expected of the age and is in good shape. I have never seen another 1892 pattern as desirable as this one.

SOLD
EA5009 - A really rare 1882 pattern cavalry trooper's sword and scabbard. These are so scarce that this is only the second one I have ever had. It's a good example, being in good condition and with a bunch of markings, showing that it was issued to an outfit using the abreviation 'SFF' (I am not sure what this stands for - something Field or Frontier Force maybe?), the sword being first made in Birmingham by Mole in February 1884. It then seems to have been sent to the Royal Small Arms Factory in Enfield for repairs, before being re-issued. The blade has some very minor pitting (very shallow - pictured), which seems to have been cleaned in period judging by the patina (maybe this was the repair Enfield carried out?). The guard and scabbard are in great condition and the grips are very good indeed. Everything is solid and the sword sheaths well in the scabbard. I personally think that this is a better handling sword than the 1885 pattern which replaced it and the grip is a better shape (which improves edge-alignment issues in the cut).

SOLD
EA5017 - An attractive, named and dated light cavalry sword. The name 'F. W. Hayward' (dated 1856) has turned up no positive results for me. This is a nice big sword with broad 35 inch blade, which seems to have been a private purchase, perhaps by a Yeomanry member or an NCO in the regular Army. The leather (rather than shark skin) grip and general appearance of the sword is similar to a trooper's issued weapon, but the lack of ears to the backstrap and the blade etching allude to an officer's version of the 1821 pattern. There are many possible explanations for this and the lack of an VR cypher on the blade may mean that this is non-military and for personal defence or perhaps police, but my guess is that it's a private purchase by someone in a local yeomanry regiment. In any case it is a nice sword and feels great in the hand. With a name and a date there is also good research potential here. The condition is really good - the blade is bright and the fine etching clear. The leather of the grip is particularly good for the age and the whole hilt assembly is rock solid.

SOLD
EA5020 - A Napoleonic era infantry officer's spadroon (1796 pattern) with a blue and gilt blade. This is a good example of the pattern - blue and gilt blades indicating more expensive versions of the time. The blue is quite dull, but it is nevetheless clear. Some of the gilt also remains and the contrasting polished foible of the blade is also in generally good condition. There are some areas of light pitting, as shown in the photos. The hilt is in very nice shape, with deep crisp cast decoration and everything is pretty tight on the tang. The grip wire remains to the grip and there is about 50% of the gilding remaining to the surface of the brass hilt parts - a lot on the pommel in particular. The blade seems to have been service sharpened and retains a good tip.

SOLD
A nice example of a piquet weight 1821 pattern Royal Artillery officer's sword. This is overall in good condition, with a clean blade, crisp etching, a good degree of preservation on the nickel plating to both hilt and scabbard, the shagreen and the grip wire also being good. Only relatively affluent officers tended to buy a second sword of piquet weight for dress, but these were proved blades (as shown by the proof slug) and were occasionally carried on active service. This example could have been made by Mole (not 100% sure, but the proof slug looks rather like a Mole) and probably dates to the 1860-1880 period. 81cm blade.

SOLD
EA5014 - A good quality broad fighting Indian tulwar of the 18th or 19th century, with a maker's mark on the blade. This sword needs some restoration/cleaning, but is all solid and sound. It has a broad blade which with its maker's mark and general form may turn out to be wootz, but currently is covered in an old varnish which has turned brown - you can see in the photos where I started to remove some of this. There is some light pitting to the steel under the varnish, but it should clean up nicely with work. The hilt is nice and chunky, fairly large and comfortable, and the hilt is totally solid on the tang with plenty of securing pitch evident.

SOLD
EA5001 - A lovely mid-Victorian Royal Artillery officer's sword of good quality and with a very high degree of original plating and polish remaining. The photos speak for themselves - there is some limited dark staining to the blade here and there which could probably be cleaned, but otherwise this sword is in splendid condition, as bright as it would have been when first sold. The shagreen grip is also very dark, as these grips were originally and even the scabbard is fully plated and bright. I am not certain of the maker, though the proof slug is similar to Mole's. A lovely sword that would honour any collection - it's also a very nimble sword in the hand, for the type.

SOLD
EA5012 - A Napoleonic era British light infantry or Rifles officer's sabre/hanger. This is a lovely sword, not quite short enough for me to feel comfortable calling it a hanger, but shorter than a 1796 pattern cavalry sabre, which is clearly its inspiration in design to some extent. The brass hilt fittings are clearly inspired by the 1796 and so this sword probably dates to 1796-1820ish, being very likely to be from the Napoleonic Wars. On the blade is a strung horn motif, which is usually associated with Rifles or Light Infantry, as well as some initials (the officer?) and a word which I cannot read. Great research potential! The blade is in really lovely condition for the age and is very sharp. So sharp that one might think it has been sharpened recently, but the patina suggests that it has just been well kept. The brass of the hilt is in nice condition, with original patina which I have not touched. The leather of the grip is very good, with signs of genuine age, but all sound. The grip wire is also in place and secure. The hilt is all pretty tight on the tang, though I'll note that the tang peen is strangely recessed in the pommel. A fascinating and effective sword, with interesting research potential.

SOLD
EA5023 - A late-Victorian Wilkinson numbered infantry officer's sword, with the officer's initials to the blade. This sword was re-hilted to the new regulation steel hilt in 1895/96 and features an 1845 pattern blade which was purchased from Wilkinson in 1881. I believe the officer in question to be Ernest Perceval Wood. Wood was commissioned in January 1881 from the Royal Military College to the 58th Foot. He transferred very soon after from 58th Foot to 48th Foot. In 1885, Wood moved to the Madras Staff Corps from 48th Foot and then to the 20th Madras Native Infantry. In 1895 he was temporarily promoted to Major, while being second in command of the regiment. He married on 11 March 1896 to Adria Louisa Macdonald, second daughter of late-Lt Col. H C Macdonald, 108th Regiment of Foot. The sword itself is very nice, featuring a 32 1/2 inch blade (by 1 1/18 inch wide), which has been service sharpened. The blade is bright, the etching clear. It is solid in the hilt. The 1895 pattern hilt is in good condition with some wear. The shagreen grip is good, the grip wire generally good with one strand missing at the pommel end. The scabbard is quite pitted, but has protected the blade well and fits as it should. A lovely sword with great research potential.

SOLD
EA5022 - An immaculate early Wilkinson infantry officer's sword, for a named officer of field rank. This sword is simply stunning to look at and hold - the brass scabbard indicates a Major or higher rank and the name on the Wilkinson ledger (dating to November 1860) records "J Scott" as the purchaser. There are a handful of possible candidates in the Army Lists, but I believe that it is probably Colonel James Scott of the Bombay Infantry, who was made Brigadier General in September 1859. My reasoning is that this sword is furnished with a brass scabbard (so someone who was a Major at least) and the sword is in such good condition that I believe this was purchased with the brass scabbard in 1860 when the officer was already of senior rank (and probably looking to update his parade gear!). The blade is practically perfect for a sword over 150 years old, with stunning original mirror polish contrasting with the perfect frost etching. The brass guard and backstrap are in good shape and show some degree of wear from buffing, suggesting that this sword was worn for a good few years after being purchased. The shagreen is perfect and the grip wire is almost perfect - just missing a thin strand from the top and bottom of the grip. The hilt assembly is all rock solid and the tang nut is in good shape. The leather washer is still in place. The scabbard is also very good and remarkably un-dented for a 150 year old brass scabbard. Basically a perfect example of the sword pattern, nice and early, by the most renowned maker of the day, with bags of research potential.

SOLD
EA5021 - A mid-Victorian Rifle Brigade officer's sword, retailed by Cater of Pall Mall. This sword is in need of a good clean - I have given the blade a once-over to reveal the blade surface (which was formerly covered with some kind of varnish). The etching is quite detailed and good quality, the blade surface with medium patina for the age, but in good physical shape. The guard and backstrap still have the goopy old varnish covering, which needs cleaning off. The shagreen and grip wire are pretty good, though there is a little bit of loss to the pommel end of the wooden grip (see photos). The hilt is all solid on the tang. A good little restoration project and nice that it is Rifle Brigade rather than Volunteers.

SOLD
EA5018 - An 1895 pattern infantry officer's sword, by Manton. There is a large chance that this blade was made by Wilkinson and supplied to Manton, according to current theories about this proof slug. This is a good quality sword and has been well service sharpened. It has patina to all steel parts and the blade etching is quite faded, but it most of the etching is still visible. Some of the grip wire is missing, but the shagreen is in generally decent condition. The hilt and blade are tight. The attractive 1895 guard is in nice shape and the scabbard is present - though there is a little split in the steel near the bottom drag. A good quality sword that probably saw action - it was made in 1895/96 and probably sold to an officer service in India/NW Frontier.

SOLD
EA5016 - An Indonesian/Javanese  pedang of sword size. The blade is probably imported and respite the heavy pitting shown in the photos is still springy and functional. The blade is secure in the wooden hilt. The carved dark wood of the hilt and scabbard match and the rattan binding remains around the scabbard halves. Priced to match the heavy pitting, but still an interesting piece and probably dating to the 1800s.

SOLD
EA5019 - A WW1 era infantry officer's sword by Fenton of Sheffield. The Sheffield makers expanded rapidly in WW1, due to the strain put on the traditional sword making centres of Birmingham and London by the demands of WW1 recruitment expansion. Fenton were probably the best of the Sheffield makers and this example is in very nice condition, being also complete with its scabbard and belt frog. Everything is tight, the plating and polish is all very good, the shagreen is great and the grip wire all good also. With a little bit of treatment to the leather, this sword could be put into use by a modern serving infantry officer.

SOLD
EA5011 - An Edward VII period infantry officer's sword, by Pillin. This sword is missing the scabbard and is somewhat worn, however it is in solid condition and bright. Pillin were a top maker and this is a nice quality fighting sword, sharpened for service. The shagreen is in good condition and the thickest wire of the grip remains.

SOLD
EA5006 - A good quality mid to late-Victorian infantry officer's sword of piquet weight, by top maker Edward Thurkle. Despite this being of narrower form, it is a proved and combat-worthy blade, of full length, by top maker Thurkle. The etching on the blade is quite faint and there is patina. The hilt is all in nice order and only the tiniest movement in the guard, none in the grip. Complete with a one-ringed scabbard.

SOLD
A top quality and sought-after pre-numbered Wilkinson Royal Artillery officer's sword. Being pre-numbered means this was made by Wilkinson between 1845 and 1854, which places it around the time of some very interesting conflicts. Pre-numbered Wilkinsons are not frequently encountered and this is a very nice piece in good condition generally. There is a tiny bit of loss to the shagreen at the fringes, but the silver grip wire is in place and tight. The metal of the hilt is in good order and bright. The hilt is solid on the tang. The lovely big blade features very detailed etching, which is rubbed smooth in some areas (including where the maker's name is on the ricasso - but we know it is Wilkinson from the proof slug and etching style). The blade seems to have been service sharpened and has a few nicks in the cutting edge (pictured). A lovely sword from a fascinating period, by the most sought-after maker. Could very well have seen some interesting service.

SOLD
EA5004 - A stunning mid-Victorian infantry officer's sword in almost perfect condition. The blade has some extremely minor blemishes, but is otherwise in fantastic original mirror polish, contrasting with the flawless frost etching decoration. The hilt retains a lot of original gilt wash over the brass and is in superb shape, with the shagreen and grip wire also in fantastic condition. The brass scabbard, also in excellent condition, indicates an officer of field rank (Major or above). The hilt is solid on the tang and the buff leather washer is in place. This sword even has the original sword knot still in place. The proof slug marks this as the work of Pillin, one of the best makers of the day and probably meaning that this dates to the 1860s. A wonderful quality sword in amazing condition; these do not come along very often at all.

SOLD
EA5010 - An attractive lion-pommelled sword of the Napoleonic era. At first sight I thought that this was a cavalry bandman's sword (for musicians to defend themselves when attacked), but I am not certain that is what it is. The blade is clearly inspired by the 1796 light cavalry sabre and it is well sharpened and handles very nicely. The blade is solid in the bronze hilt and there appears to be a compressed leather washer inserted under the langets keeping everything snug. One of the quillons appears to have a repaired crack in it, but everything seems solid and there is no movement. It's possible that there is some sort of East India Company association with this sword and that is why it doesn't match the usual British Army format for cavalry musician swords. A nice nible sword in the hand with a lovely blade.

SOLD
EA5007 - A mid-Victorian Rifles officer's sword in need of cleaning. This is fundamentally in fairly decent condition - the shagreen and grip wire are in good condition and the hilt has some very superficial dirt and rust spots to be cleaned off. The blade is very dark with patina and dirt, as can be seen in the photos - however, it seems to be smooth and un-pitted, with the etching visible underneath. A few hours of cleaning should bring this sword up to a nice display standard. Everything is pretty solid, though there is a very tiny amount of movement in the guard, the rest of the hilt being solid on the tang. Complete with matching scabbard.

SOLD
[Updated description with thanks to Craig Hooper for new info]
An 1853 pattern cavalry sword by Mole of Birmingham, marked for the New Zealand 'Armed Constabulary Force' (circa 1870s). This is based on the 1853 pattern cavalry sword of the British Army, but is deliberately made slightly lighter and with a 33 inch blade (instead of the normal 35 inches). Frankly it is also slightly better quality of construction than most 1853 patterns. On the underside of the guard is 'ACF'. This is therefore a very rare sword and also a really nicely made example of the pattern, which feels great in the hand and more nimble than the normally sized version. This example has been very well service sharpened and remains relatively sharp. The leather grips are in great condition, with the tiniest amount of movement only. The blade and guard are quite dark with patina and I have not cleaned them at all - the surface of the steel looks good and this sword could be cleaned up brighter fairly easily.
The Armed Constabulary Force in around 1880:


SOLD
EA5005 - A clean example of a mid-Victorian infantry officer's sword, service sharpened and dating to 1845-1860. This is a fairly light example, but full size and the edge has clearly been sharpened for service, so perhaps Crimean War or there abouts. The folding inner guard shows that this is unlikely to date later than 1860 and the pattern came into use in 1845. The blade is in nice condition, with a bright shiny blade and fairly clear etching. The retailer seems to be Edwards of London, though it is quite faint. The hilt is all in good order with all the shagreen and grip wire in place. There is a very little bit of lateral wiggle in the hilt. No scabbard.

SOLD
EA5003 - A 1796 pattern infantry officer's spadroon from the Napoleonic era. This is a nice condition example for a sword that is 200 years old. The hilt is bright and all present and correct. The blade has some areas of pitting, but it pretty good and fairly bright. The hilt has been tightened with the use of little wooden slivers it seems, but this has done the job well and does not show, resulting in a fairly solid hilt on the tang. This is the type with a fixed guard. The standard line infantry officer's sword for nearly the whole of the Napoleonic Wars, at a great price.

SOLD
An enigmatic 1821 pattern light cavalry officer's type sword. This is not an officer's sword, as it has a leather grip, a plan un-etched blade (both which can be found on officer's swords occasionally), but the real clincher is that  the guard has engraved regimental numbers on it - so this was a regimentally owned sword, not a private purchase. The blade is slightly shorter than normal, at 33 inches, so I feel that this is probably a special regimental pattern for one of the Indian cavalry regiments - or if not that then perhaps a specially ordered sword for a Non-Commissioned Officer. I can see no WD, BO or ISD stamps. Everything is rock solid and most of the leather of the grip is present. Overall an unusual sword with research potential, probably dating to around 1830-60, in sound condition.

SOLD
A George V era Royal Artillery officer's sword of good quality. The proof slug suggests that this is the work of the revived Reeves company after it was resurrected by Wilkinson. Certainly the quality is top level. The blade is in good condition and mostly bright, with quite faint etching and some dark staining in areas. It is solid in the hilt. The guard and backstrap are in very nice condition and finish, being bright and plated. The shagreen is also very good, though the thinnest strands of the silver grip wire have gone. Everything is solid - no scabbard.

SOLD
An substantial Indian sword, probably of the early-19th century, with a basket hilt and unusual blade shape which is somewhere between a khanda and a sosun pattah. This is a very well constructed sword and very rare - I am uncertain of the dating, but it is probably 19th century, perhaps being earlier. The hilt is of a design which dates back to the 16th century and the blade is single-edged, with a clipped-point. The blade is solid in the hilt and the edge is fine, if not quite sharp to the touch anymore. There is a maker's mark forged into the blade (pictured) which looks to me like Shiva's trident. The hilt is a nice size and I can hold it quite comfortably. This is a very impressive sword in the hand and is very sturdy without being overweight.

SOLD
A Norwegian naval cutlass 'Marine Huggert' M1850, clearly based on the British 1845/1859 pattern. The maker's mark is clearly visible, indicating it was made by the Kongsberg Våpenfabrikk (Kongsberg Arms factory) in Norway. The intials IL are also visible, which indicate the control officer Jens Landmark, who worked at Kongsberg Våpenfabrikk from 11 March 1853 to 1 November 1854*. There is some light pitting, but this is in really good condition for a cutlass of this age and everything is rock solid. This is a substantial model of sword and it is shorter but heavier than the British 1845 pattern.

SOLD

* Many thanks to Terje Halvorsen for helping me identify this piece.
A Victorian 1827 pattern Rifles officer's sword in field service scabbard, retailed by Hobson and blade made by Pillin. This is a good quality sword with a blade in very good condition, featuring a bright surface and clear, crisp etching. The hilt has some cosmetic issues - the guard is okay, but has been over-cleaned at some point in its life, the shagreen and wood grip has a little loss at the pommel end and one strand of the grip wire is missing. The hilt is solid on the tang though and the scabbard is in decent condition - overall a good example of the model, with a very good blade. 83cm blade.

SOLD
An 1895 pattern infantry officer's sword, dating to between 1895 and 1897. This example is missing its scabbard and in average condition, with some skrinkage and loss to the shagreen. Despite this, the blade is bright, with most of the etching visible and is solid in the hilt. The proof slug may indicate that this was made by Wilkinson for an outfitter, as this was the symbol they used for their trade blades. 1895 pattern swords are not very common, as they were only being made for 2 years.

SOLD
A rare Hungarian cavalry officer's sword of the mid-19th century. This sword is lovely in the hand and well put together, featuring a pipe-back blade which is adorned with various patriotic motifs and slogans. The four-bar guard is reminiscent of some British and French light cavalry officers' swords and indeed the grip is very British in style, featuring British-style shagreen and grip wire, which are both in good condition. A scarce and very interesting sword, from an interesting period in Hungary's history. No scabbard unfortunately.

SOLD
A nice example of a 1796 pattern light cavalry trooper's sabre by Dawes of Birmingham. There is no scabbard with this one and there are a few cosmetic issues - there is light pitting all over the hilt, the grip leather is dry a bit brittle and has some loss and there are some woodworm holes in the grip (not affecting anything structural as far as I can tell). However, the blade is in nice shape, with clear maker's mark and approval stamp, and unusually the hilt is solid on the tang (they normally get a loose guard when the leather washer contracts with age). This is good solid example of the type, of this ever-popular and increasingly difficult to source pattern of sword. Feels great in the hand and is a joy to move around.

SOLD
A Victorian 1822 pattern infantry officer's sword, dating to between 1837-1845. The blade in reasonable condition, but with no visible etching left (this is normally very light on pipebacks). The hilt is a little loose on the tang, due to the loss of the leather washer. The hilt in quite good condition, with all the shagreen and grip wire. No scabbard.

SOLD
A vintage kris dagger, perhaps Balinese. The hilt and scabbard are intricately and finely carved, the grip is tight on the tang. The blade is pattern welded with starkly contrasting nickel and dark steel, giving a very lively and interesting 'pamor'. Difficult to date, but probably mid-20th century - these are still being made in the same way that they have been for over 200 years.

SOLD
A late-Victorian infantry officer's sword, dating to before 1892, by Thurkle. This sword needs some attention - the blade needs cleaning and the guard is a little loose. The rest of the hilt seems tight though and the blade has some decent etching on it - Thurkle was a very good maker. The shagreen is in very good condition, though there is a bit of loss to the grip wire. I nice sword for some light restoration.

SOLD
A Victorian Rifles officer's sword. This has a plain blade, plain proof slug as far as I can see and dark patina to the hilt. The shagreen and grip wire is good and the hilt is solid. No scabbard unfortunately.

SOLD
A scarce Lead Cutter cutlass by Robert Mole of Birmingham. Lead cutters were used for 'sword feats', as featured in the treatise 'Lessons in Sabre' by John Musgrave Waite. Originally modelled on the 1845 pattern naval cutlass, they went through various evolutions and came in roughly four different sizes. They were predominantly used for tests of skill, cutting triangular-section bars of lead, as well as dead animals (usually sheep). This full-tang type seem to have been around in the c.1890-1910 period and are distinguishable from the earlier versions by having an exposed wide tang, with cast iron grip scales. This example is in superb condition and still quite sharp. The black paint on the hilt is probably original and the makers' mark is very crisp, with the surface of the blade still being bright. This was probably considered a number 2 weight - far from the heaviest or largest, but still much bigger and heavier than a standard cutlass.

SOLD
A composite French-style smallsword in Napeolonic style. This sword seems to have been reconstructed from parts. The blade seems to be original, as is most of the scabbard (the throat is a replacement). The grip looks to me to be original, but the pommel looks like a replica and I am uncertain about the shell guard and knucklebow. The scabbard leather is worn and clearly old, with a break halfway down, currently disguised by an internal repair made of copper. The end result is a sword that cannot be claimed to be 'original', but contains antique elements and looks like a smallsword of the time of Napoleon. The contruction is all solid, though the grip is at a slight angle to the blade. Feels like an original in the hand.

SOLD
A lovely and interesting mid-Victorian light cavalry officer's sword, retailed by Hebbert & Co. The specific address given on the ricasso for Hebbert & Co (a quality outfitter) dates this sword to 1850-1864. The proof slug may indicate manufacture by Mole of Birmingham, but I am not certain in this case. The whole sword and scabbard are in good condition. The blade is bright, with clear etching and minimal patina. It is solid in the hilt. The hilt is all in good preservation, with bright steel parts matching the patina of the blade - the shagreen is all present and in good condition, as is the grip wire, featuring a somewhat unusual pattern. The scabbard has a little light pitting, as you'd expect after 150+ years, but is fundamentally also in good condition and perfectly fits the sword and obviously always belonged with it. A very nice cavalry officer's sword of big proportions and from the period of the Crimean War and Indian Mutiny: A proper fighting sword.

SOLD
A top quality Royal Artillery officer's sword by Pillin, with a superb blade. The blade in original polish and brightness is of the larger size and is very good by any standard. It is solid in the hilt and all the etching is crisp, with only a few little dark marks here and there. The hilt and scabbard have been more exposed to the elements and would benefit from further cleaning. The shagreen is in good condition and the grip wire is nearly 100%, but is a little worn with age. Overall a great sword dating to around 1864-1880, wonderful in the hand and a top quality fighting weapon, with a superb blade.

SOLD
A private purchase kukri (perhaps for an officer) from around WW2 probably, perhaps a little earlier. It features an attractive green horn grip and very good quality double-fuller blade. Complete with its scabbard (but missing any of the extra tools), this is a really nice piece, with a gorgeous blade. Would benefit from a little light restoration.

SOLD
  A WW1 era 1908 pattern British cavalry sword, by Wilkinson, marked to the Worcester Yeomanry. Sadly the sword is missing its scabbard, but is in great condition and being well service sharpened I presume it was carried during WW1. The blade is remarkably clean, the Wilkinson name very clear, the sharpening it still crisp, the leather washer is in place. The hilt is in equally good condition, with a smooth un-pitted guard and the chequering on the composition grip still well defined. Everything is tight and solid.

SOLD

Corporal Dabbs of the Worcester Yeomanry during WW1, with his 1908 pattern secured to the saddle:
 
SOLD ARCHIVE 6
SOLD ARCHIVE 5
SOLD ARCHIVE 4
SOLD ARCHIVE 3
SOLD ARCHIVE 2
SOLD ARCHIVE 1