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I also purchase at fair prices. I am mainly looking to buy Victorian officers' swords, Victorian cavalry swords, Indian swords and Victorian pistols and revolvers.

BRITISH MILITARY SWORDS
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A late-Victorian cavalry officer's sword and field scabbard, by Wilkinson, owned originally by William Francis Wormald of the 4th Hussars (Churchill's regiment), ordered by him in 1900. An electronic copy of the original Wilkinson sales ledger is included in the sale. The blade is etched to a very high standard and is in great condition, showing Wormald's crest to one side and the 4th Hussars designation to the other. The blade is service sharpened and remains quite sharp thanks to the wooden scabbard. The hilt is also in good condition all over, with a bright finish to the metalwork, all the shagreen in good tight condition, and only a few strands of the silver wire missing. The hilt is solid on the tang. Wormald joined the 4th Hussars as 2nd Lieut in November 1900, making Lieutenant in January 1902. On 17 Nov 1902 he was made Aide-de-Camp to the Lieutenant-General of the Madras forces. He retired from the 4th Hussars around 1904. In 1914 he came out of military retirement to join the Yorkshire Hussars (yeomanry) as a Lieutenant, which may be when he had his sword service sharpened. As far as I can tell though he never saw active service in WW1, remaining on home duties. A very nice sword in good condition, surely with more research to do.

SOLD
A late-Victorian cavalry officer's sword and steel scabbard, by Wilkinson, owned originally by Albert Charles McLachlan M.C. of the 18th Hussars, a winner of various medals. McLachlan served in the Boer War and WW1. He took part in the Natal operations, acting as his C.O’s galloper, was wounded and taken prisoner at Talana on 20 October 1899. He was one of 13 men who remained in enemy hands until sent into Ladysmith during the investment, but as a prisoner on parole, he was ‘debarred from taking any further part in the war’. Subsequently attached to the West African Frontier Force, McLachlan participated in the North Nigeria operations of 1902, when he was present at Argungu and mentioned in despatches, and afterwards in the Kano-Sokoto campaign of 1903. During WW1 he won the M.C. and achieved various mentions. This fantastic sword comes with a volume of research, as well as a full list of the medals he was awarded, and the Wilkinson sales record. As the sword dates to 1900 it is assumed he lost his first sword in South Africa and this is a replacment. This is the sword he would have carried in the Nigeria operation and probably WW1 also. It is service sharpened accordingly and features a beautiful blade, with the 18th Hussars designation and is bright overall with good polish. The guard, backstrap and scabbard are all in fairly good condition. The hilt is tight on the tang, though the grip has suffered from campaigning and age, with some of the shagreen missing, as well as a few strands of the silver wire. This sword is itself a very nice piece, the condition of the blade and etching being the highlight, but the real value of the sword is the original officer owner and their fascinating career, which is fully detailed in the research included in the sale.

£995 + P&P
A late-Victorian officer's sword and field scabbard with a fascinating history, marked to Hodson's Horse. Infantry officer's blade, by Wilkinson, on a post-1896 cavalry officer's hilt. The sword was originally that of Captain (later Colonel) Albert Edward Whistler, which he bought from Wilkinson in 1888, in preparation for his promotion to the rank of Captain in the Bengal Infantry (later Bengal Staff). The sword ordered was originally a 'full infantry' model, that being at the time the 1854 pattern brass-hilted infantry officer's sword, in full size at 1 1/18" by 33" (the 'medium infantry' was 1" wide). Albert Edward Whistler experienced an interesting career, serving in the Egyptian campaign of 1882 and Burma in 1885-87, but this sword's history did not stop with him. Albert Edward Whistler had several children, among them General Sir Lashmer Gordon Whistler GCB, KBE, DSO, one of Montgomery's leading infantry officers of WW2. Another of Albert's sons was Aubrey Rivett Whistler, who passed through Sandhurst in 1914, joining the Royal Fusiliers in 1915 and then in 1916 joined the Xth Duke of Cambridge's Own Lancers (Hodson's Horse). Aubrey stayed with Hodson's Horse after WW1 and retired in 1923. Arthur Edward Whistler obviously gave this 1888-dated sword to his son (which may have already been re-hilted with the newer 1895 or 1897 pattern hilt by that point), but either Arthur or Aubrey had the blade re-mounted with the 1896 pattern cavalry officer's hilt, also getting the blade re-etched (almost certainly by Wilkinson) to show the Hodson's Horse regimental marking and the GRI monarch's monogram instead of what must have been VR originally. Aubrey Rivett Whistler saw a lot of active service throughout WW1, first with the Royal Fusiliers and then with Hodson's Horse, both in the Middle East against the Turkish Empire, and in France against the Germans. The sword is a lovely example, being in overall good condition, the blade bright and etching clear, with only some little blemishes. The blade has been service sharpened, of course, and remains quite sharp thanks to the wood and leather field scabbard, which is in good condition. The hilt is solid on the tang and in good condition, with a bright guard and backstrap showing much original plating, the shagreen and silver grip wire all being prevent. A wonderful sword and a fantastic history, with lots more detailed research to do. The sale included an electronic copy of the Wilkinson sale record.

£895 + P&P
A superior quality and rare Georgian officer's smallsword/courtsword, intended to be worn with 'Windsor Uniform', as George III was pictured in. This type of sword was worn by high-ranking British officers in the Napoleonic era, when serving in court or on State occasions (thanks to Georgian sword expert David Critchley for helping to identify this). The motto on the blade 'Honi soit qui mal y pense' relates to the Knights of the Garter, so the original owner was presumably a member. The sword is overall in very nice condition, with a copper-alloy gilded hilt, with a high percentage of the original gilding remaining. It once had a knucklebow, but this has been deliberately and well removed - at first I did not notice it had ever had one. The hole for the bottom of the knucklebow is visible in the side of the pommel. The pommel turns on the tang, but the hilt is actually tight on the hilt, with barely any movement. The blade is in very nice condition, straight and mostly bright, with clear engraving. The hilt, as mentioned, is in superb condition, even having the original and very elaborate wire grip covering with 'turks heads' knots, entirely complete and tight. A very nice sword which feels nice in the hand. If the knucklebow were still present (even though apparently removed deliberately), I would be asking considerably more for this piece.

£595 + P&P
A Georgian 1796 pattern light cavalry trooper's sabre, with regimental marking, by top maker Osborn. This example has been either slightly shortened, or was originally made slightly shorter than standard, having a 29 inch blade. This seems very deliberate, but the reason is unknown - perhaps for a shorter/younger trooper, such as a musician, who were often teenage boys - 29 inches was also a common length for infantry officer's sabres of the time, so another possibility is that it was repurposed as an infantry officer's fighting sword. The regimental marking of CD might indicate a dragoons regiment, or perhaps something else - I don't know. Below it is what might be an armour rack number or a trooper number. Osborn's name is clearly visible to the spine. The leather washer is still present, but as this has shrunk with age, it has left the hilt a little loose on the tang. However it is secure, being securely riveted at the pommel and through the grip. The blade has been sharpened and remains somewhat sharp. Lack of scabbard and length reflected in the price.

£475 + P&P
A light cavalry officer's sword by Garden of 200 Piccadilly, London. This maker is sought after and made swords almost exclusively for British officers joining Indian service. The lack of ricasso and retailer's name etched higher up on the blade suggest that this is an early example, perhaps from around 1845, when the fullered blade was first made regulation for cavalry officer's swords. The condition is average, with park patina overall and some pitting. The hilt is a bit loose on the tang, though it is secure. The rear quillon has been deliberately removed. The shark skin of the grip is in good condition and the main twist of silver grip wire is still present, although the two lateral strands are missing. No scabbard. A rare sword by a desirable retailer, but in worn condition. Could be improved with some work.

SOLD
A rare transitional type of Royal Navy officer's sword, from around 1846. In 1846 Royal Navy officers' swords changed from a pipe-back quill-pointed blade, to a spear-pointed fullered blade designed by Henry Wilkinson. However this blade combines features of both blade types, with a fullered blade and quill-pointed tip. It is therefore likely to date to the few years around that change over, putting it in a really interesting period for Navy history. It is of slightly smaller than average size, with a 28 inch blade and it quite dainty. The condition is very good overall - the blade is bright and the etching is faint, though mostly visible. The hilt is in good condition, with the shark skin and grip wire, though there is a little movement in the guard. The folding guard flap operates well and stays in place. The scabbard is in good condition for the age, with a couple of cracks in the leather - one which could do with a repair. The scabbard throat has initials on it, presumably for the officer - they seem to be M.R. A rare sword in good condition.

£495 + P&P SALE PENDING

OOTHER SWORDS AND WEAPONS
An African dagger. Date and origin unknown.

£25 + P&P RESERVED
An old Nepalese or Indian kukri with elaborate decoration. Unknown age, but probably pre-WW2. The blade has some strange crackling in the surface (pictured), but the whole thing is solid. An unusual presentation piece.

£50 + P&P RESERVED
   

Examples of recently sold items
A good quality 33rd Stafford Rifle Volunteers officer's sword, named to G Lee, by quality outfitter Firmin & Sons, in need of restoration. This is a good quality sword and named to both the branch of the Volunteer Rifles and with the officer's name, but has light rust all over. The blade etching is visible, but faint. Cleaned up, this could be a really nice collector's sword and it is all solid and sound, for someone looking for a sword to wave around! The grip is in really good condition, with all the shagreen and grip wire. No scabbard. Priced according to the work needed.

SOLD
An early-Victorian infantry sergeant's sword for restoration. This example has the characteristic quill-pointed blade and unusually a folding hilt section (sergeant's sword guards are normally one piece, not folding). The blade is slightly smaller than average, but in nice condition. The hilt is fairly solid on the hilt. There are lots of cosmetic issues, as shown in the photos - this sword is priced accordingly as a restoration piece.

SOLD
A Napoleonic era 1805 pattern Royal Navy officer's sword, of superior quality, with blue and gilt blade and ivory grip. There is no maker's name visible on this piece (that was perhaps on the scabbard, which is missing), but it is clearly of top notch manufacture. The blue and gilt blade is in above-average condition, with most of the blue and gilt visible, some areas of patina and a little corrosion here and there. The hilt is a little loose on the hilt (this could be corrected by a restorer) and there is some chipping to the pommel end of the ivory grip. However the hilt is secure on the tang, the ivory is otherwise in nice condition and the grip wire is still in place. This sword would benefit from professional restoration, but is still presentable as it is, being an absolutely top level Royal Navy officer's sword of the post-Trafalgar period of the Napoleonic Wars. A very desirable piece at a fair price.

SOLD
An 1890 pattern cavalry trooper's sword and scabbard. This example with numerous markings, showing that it was made at Enfield and possible re-tested in Birmingham, probably made in 1893 and re-issued throughout the 1890s. It has the WD acceptance mark and was used in the yeomanry at one point. The blade is bright and clean, with only an area of discolouration near the hilt. The leather grips are quite nice and still solid on the tang, though both the hilt and scabbard have been exposed to the elements and become pitted as a result. Nevetheless, everything is solid and functionally it is a decent sword.

SOLD
A light cavalry officer's sword, for Indian cavalry service with beautiful scabbard, retailed by Badham, Pile & Co of Bombay, with blade by Pillin of London (from the proof disc and etching style). A fighting officer's sword, with Indian style leather-covered wooden scabbard to preserve edge sharpness, this sword features an extensively service sharpened blade. The hilt and scabbard fittings were all once nickel-plated, and this remains on much of the surface. The blade is mostly bright and clean - the etching is actually quite clear to see, but hard to see in the photos because it is quite shallow and hard to photograph; this is typical of Pillin etching style, but also the blade has probably been buffed quite a lot during its service life. 95% of the shark skin remains to the grip and nearly all of the silver grip wire. This is a lovely service sword with a wonderful and rare Indian campaigning scabbard.

SOLD
A 19th century French 'cabbage chopper', modeled on their idea of a Roman gladius. This is a hefty short sword, this example being made by quality factory Coulaux. The blade has some areas of rust and pitting, but with some cleaning this could be improved a lot - it is mostly superficial. The blade is rock solid in the brass hilt. A surprisingly fun sword to hold - heavier than most people would expect.

SOLD
A Belgian 1889 pattern cavalry officer's sword, made by Carl Eickhorn of Solingen, for the Belgian state police - 20th century. The blade is bright and unblemished, the etching all clear and crisp, including the motto "Voor Koning en Vaderland". This is Flemish - most of these swords have the motto in French. The blade is solid in the hilt and an impressively large 36 inches long. The hilt is in equally excellent condition, with crisply cast brass hilt, horn handle all intant and solid, with all the brass wire in place. A very pretty sword, of impressive size and wonderful condition. No scabbard unfortunately.

SOLD
A French Gras bayonet in less than average condition! This poor bayonet has lost the end of its blade and is overall quite rusty. The scabbard is very pitted. It could make a little project for someone though.

SOLD
An African dagger. Date and origin unknown.

SOLD
An early or mid-Victorian infantry sergeant's sword for restoration. This example has the characteristic quill-pointed blade and the blade is in nice condition and marked Mole at the base of the spine (Mole of Birmingham). The hilt is fairly solid on the hilt, but has clearly been removed and refitted (with the wrong type of grip wire). There are lots of cosmetic issues, as shown in the photos - this sword is priced accordingly as a restoration piece.

SOLD
A Victorian infantry sergeant's sword and scabbard, by Mole of Birmingham. This is a nice example, though the blade would benefit from cleaning. The maker's name and various War Department stamps are visible to the forte of the blade. The blade is plain (as sergeant's swords generally are) and mostly bright, but with areas of light rust that need cleaning off. The blade is solid in the hilt. The hilt is in good shape, with the brass all as it should be, the leather washer still in place and the grip is very good, with all the shagreen and grip wire. The scabbard is in decent shape and with a good fit obviously belongs to the sword. A good example of the type which would benefit from a little cleaning.

SOLD
A top quality Rifles officer's sword, by Wilkinson, numbered to 1881 and with etched initials to a named officer. The sword was owned by Major David Gamble, 2nd Volunteer Battalion, The Prince of Wales's Volunteers (South Lancashire Regiment), of Talardy, St Asaph, Flintshire (born 1856). His family were part of what became "Proctor and Gamble" incidentally and various members of his family are interesting to read about. The sword comes with a small file of research about the officer and a copy of the original Wilkinson record of sale. The sword itself is in good condition, with the blade being very clean and bright with much original polish remaining. The guard has some very light pitting, though could be cleaned or re-blued if desired. The shagreen of the grip is in good condition and most of the wire is in place, with only a couple of the thinner strands missing. The hilt is rock solid on the tang. The scabbard has some pitting, but is solid and sound, fitting the blade well. A top quality sword with some very interesting historical connections.

SOLD
An early 1822 pattern infantry officer's sword, to George IV's reign (dating to 1822-1830 therefore). This example is in overall good condition. The blade is dark all over with patina, but sound, and the limited amount of etching is largely visible. The hilt retains a lot of original gilt, the shagreen grip and wire being in good condition still. There is a slight amount of movement in the guard and a slight bend to the folding section and hinge - though it still functions perfectly well and the hilt is solid on the tang otherwise. The scabbard fits well, though is later Victorian. This is a more robust example of the pipe-backed blade than average and may well be a Prosser, although no maker's mark is now visible. These early examples are not common and are not usually in such good condition as this one - the blade could certainly be cleaned up brighter.

SOLD
A wonderful Wilkinson Royal Artillery officer's sword, with the officer's crest and motto and research details. Carried in the New Zealand Land Wars. The blade is numbered 11276 for 1861 and belonged to Sir Charles Larcom (1843-1892), 2nd Baronet Larcom, who rose to become a Lieutenant-Colonel in the Royal Artillery. He served in Australia, New Zealand, the Caribbean and was eventually Commander-in-Chief of the garrison in Malta. He won the New Zealand Medal for services in 1863-64, being present at the actions of Katikara and Kaitak, where he was wounded in the shoulder (mentioned in despatches). He commanded a detachment of artillery engaged at Sentry Hill. The sword is in great condition, with a clean blade, crisp etching, all solid in the hilt, the shark skin and silver grip wire all in place. A very nice sword, but with a fantastic history and a must-have for anyone interested in the New Zealand wars.

SOLD
A French M1866 Chassepot rifle bayonet, marked as being made in 1874 (I think it says). The scabbard button is an unusual shape and the blade doesn't quite go all the way in. Otherwise in generally decent condition.

SOLD
British 1888 pattern Lee-Metford rifle bayonet, dated to 1898. This Boer War era bayonet is in average condition and missing its scabbard. It has lots of re-issue markings, so probably saw a fair active life. The tip is somewhat blunt and it could benefit from a clean.

SOLD
What I believe is a Chinese glaive head, mounted in what remains of the original shaft. The shaft has been sawn-off to leave about 9 inches of handle, which does leave it as a function weapon - though it may simply have been shortened for display purposes. The thick glaive blade is 21 inches long and could do with a bit of straightening. There is a little movement in the shaft, but the tang pin remains in place with decorative brass surround.

SOLD
What was once a very fine quality court sword, probably early to mid-19th century. The design is basically French, though the emblem may mean it has a connection to Malta. It has some 'cosmetic issues' - the tip (only a few mm) are snapped off, one side of the mother-of-pearl grip decoration is missing, the scabbard is 50% perished and the hilt is rather loose. However what remains is a very ornate and high quality piece, with clear blade etching and the brass ornate hilt appears complete and in correct shape. This could certainly provide a worthwhile restoration project for someone.

SOLD
A French M1840 yataghan bayonet. Some markings visible, some pitting to the iron parts of the hilt and scabbard. The brass grip and steel blade both in quite nice condition.

SOLD
A good Victorian infantry officer's sword, retailed by Sherlock of London and with a dated regimental dedication etched on the blade. The blade is marked "Presented to Peter Barron by his comrades. June 1874." On the reverse side it is etched "Duke of Cornwall's Rifle Volunteers." There is research required here, because I cannot find a record of a Peter Barron being associated with the Cornwall Rifle Volunteers and there is no Peter Barron that I can find in the 1876 army list. However, the sword is mounted with a line infantry officer's hilt, rather than a Rifles hilt, and is housed in a brass scabbard, which normally indicates someone of Major or higher rank. A mystery! But I'm sure with some research time invested it should be possible to resolve these questions. The sword itself is in nice condition, with a bright well-etched and clear blade, in the 1 1/18 inch wide format. The hilt is in overall nice condition, tight on the tang, though it has lost a few strands of the wire. Overwise all good though. The scabbard is also in nice condition.

SOLD
A nice clean Victorian infantry officer's sword and scabbard, the blade with officer's initials and marked to the 1st East Yorkshire Rifle Volunteers. The sword was retailed by Hobson & Sons of London, a quality outfitter, and was probably made by Pillin, one of the best makers of the day. I have not researched the possible owner of this sword, but it is likely that they moved from the Rifle Volunteers to the regular army, as the hilt of this sword indicates service in a line infantry regiment - Rifle Volunteers should have had the steel 1827 pattern Rifles hilt with bugle emblem. So some possibly interesting research to be done here. The sword itself is in good condition, with a bright well-etched and clear blade, in the 1 inch by 32.5 inch format. The hilt is also in very nice condition, tight on the tang, the brass guard in good shape and the grip shagreen and wire all good. The scabbard is somewhat pitted, but of course that has protected the blade well. A nice clean example of the sword type with research potential.

SOLD
A rare 1821 pattern light cavalry trooper's sword. The scabbard is not original to the sword, but fits well. The sword overall is in quite good condition for a trooper's 1821. The hilt is rather pitted, but it is solid on the tang. Most of the leather even remains to the wooden grip. The blade is in very nice condition and full 35 inches, service sharpened and still quite sharp. There are various markings, which seem to indicate that it was made at Enfield in 1848, so it is entirely possible with the service sharpening that this sword saw interesting service in India, China or the Crimea. The leather washer even remains. A good example of a very hard-to-find regulation cavalry sword, which saw extensive use between 1821 and into the mid-1850s.

SOLD
A Prussian cavalry sword used in British service. These were purchased by the War Department and used in the Crimean War by engineers drivers. This example has the original Solingen maker's markings and Prussian acceptance mark, and then the British War Department markings over the top. It also has the War Department sold out of service double arrows. Overall it is in nice condition, with 90% of the leather remaining to the grip (they often lose that for some reason) and the blade is bright and without pitting. The hilt is solid on the tang. There are some flaws to mention - the little bit of leather loss, there are a few nicks to the unsharpened blade (pictured) and the leather finger loop has either falled off or been removed. There is no scabbard, as there rarely are with these British examples, as they seem to have been separated from their scabbards when stored in armouries. A rare sword with the British markings, in reasonable condition.

SOLD
A top quality infantry officer's sword by Wilkinson, with association to a named officer. This sword is un-numbered and has India Stores Depot markings, so was presumably an Indian Government purchase, also featuring the GRI cypher used by George V in India (rather than the GvR found on British Army swords). However it is the hexagonal-slug Wilkinson 'best quality' and this is highly unusual for a government-purchased weapon. Additionally, the name "Elmore" has been written on the inside of two of the frog slings, suggesting that one officer took ownership of this sword. I dates to around WW1 up to George V's death in 1936. I have not researched this Elmore, but it should be possible to identify this British officer serving in the Indian Army at this time. The sword itself is in superb condition, clean all over, with everything as it should be. I would describe this as modern parade condition, even the scabbard, and it could be used by a modern-serving infantry officer. You cannot get modern-made swords of this quality anymore - Wilkinson's best.

SOLD
A mid-Victorian light cavalry officer's sword to the Northumberland Yeomanry, with scabbard. This is a nice big hefty sword, in average condition. The blade, hilt and scabbard have a matching dark patina all over. The etching is more detailed than average and clear on most of the blade. The edge has been sharpened and has a few small nicks (see photos). The leather washer is missing, but of course this could be replaced fairly easily and the hilt remains solid on the tang. The grip shagreen and wire remains in very good condition. This sword could be polished up and improved - I have left it as it came to me.

SOLD
An extremely rare Osborn & Gunby variation of the 1796 light cavalry sabre, with clipped-back falchion point. This was a variation of the 1796 light cavalry officer's sabre which Osborn & Gunby offered towards the end of the Napoleonic Wars. It was an attempt to improve the thrusting capacity of the sabre blade, introducing a straighter blade, double-fullers and a falchion-like point. The end result is an awesome looking sword which is highly sought after by collectors and they rarely come up for sale. Very few were actually made. This example is in almost 'relic' condition in the sense that it is darkly patinated, with pitting to all parts and the grip covering (either leather or shark skin and wire) has gone. However, it is all rock solid and the blade is straight, so in the hand it is a perfectly functional weapon still. It is a very light and nimble sword and a joy to hold. Examples in good condition sell for thousands of pounds and this is a rare opportunity to add one to your colleciton. No markings are visible, though due to the unique style of the blade I think it almost certain that this is the work of Osborn and Gunby.

SOLD
A delightful French light cavalry trooper's sword (M1822), dated to 1851 and service sharpened (possible Crimean War service). This sword is a prime example of the type, it's only flaws being the grip wire having been removed and the scabbard not being present. The sword is otherwise in good condition, still quite sharp, with various inspector stamps and the factory inscription and date (February 1851) to the spine of the blade. The leather of the grip is 99% present and this is a lovely sword in the hand. Would suit a collector of Crimean War militaria.

SOLD
A nice tidy example of a 1908 pattern cavalry trooper's sword, with an early date of April 1910, by top makers Wilkinson, with an unusual custom-adapted scabbard. This sword doesn't feature the usual double-ring scabbard for attaching to the saddle, but rather a custom-made scabbard to be worn from a belt. This may possibly indicate a weapon adapted for a cavalry officer, in the period before the officer's version of this sword was brought out in 1912. It seems that many officers carried these troopers' swords until and even after the 1912 pattern was released. It features various War Department, Enfield inspection and Wilkinson stamps to blade and hilt. The blade is in nice condition and has been well service sharpened, so it was probably carried in WW1. The hilt is all solid and the grip is in very nice condition for this model of sword, with crisp chequering remaining. It could benefit from careful cleaning overall. The only downside is that the buff leather washer is missing, but a new one could be fabricated easily enough, as they just sit at the base of the blade, held by friction.

SOLD
A gorgeous Victorian light cavalry officer's sword retailed by Hawkes, with a virtually perfect blade. The hilt and scabbard of this sword are in good condition, bright and with only minor pitting to the scabbard. The hilt is solid on the tang and while it has had the grip wire removed, the shagreen is in excellent condition. However the real highlight of this sword is the blade, which retains about 95% of the original mirror polish and frost etching - it shows what these blades looked like when first made. The frost etching is outstandingly executed, as you would expect of Hawkes, who were a prestige outfitter of the time. Even the washer is dyed red to make the sword appear as high quality as possible. To add to this fantastic package, the sword handles wonderfully also. It has not been service sharpened and probably saw very little service, if any, but is a beautiful sword.

SOLD
A lovely untouched 1796 light cavalry trooper's sabre, by Osborn. These are getting harder and harder to find - even more so in such an untouched condition and with the original leather grip covering. Osborn developed this model of sword with Le Marchant himself, so this is the most iconic maker. The blade and hilt has even patina all over, which could be cleaned if desired. The leather washer is still present and there is only a tiny amount of movement in the guard, the rest of the hilt being solid on the tang. The fantastic leather grip is still 99% present, with just some little areas of cracking, which should be treated with dubbin or suchlike to protect the grip in the future. No scabbard unfortunately.

SOLD
A Napoleonic era British infantry officer's non-regulation sabre. This type of sabre started being carried unofficially by infantry officers from around 1796 and the style of the sword obviously emulates the famous 1796 light cavalry sabre, however of smaller dimensions, with a brass hilt here and a lighter blade. The hilt and blade are both in nice condition. The blade is bright, with some floral engraving visible. The brass hilt is clean and with only a little bit of movement to the guard and backstrap. The grip is in especially nice condition, with nearly all of the patent black leather remaining and all of the grip wire. No scabbard.

SOLD
A Victorian 1897 pattern infantry officer's sword and scabbard. This sword must date between 1897 and 1901 and shows no retailer or maker, however it appears good quality, above average. It has even patina over the blade and hilt and should respond well to cleaning. The grip, with shark skin and wire, is in good condition and everything is solid and tight. The scabbard is in nice condition and has the unusual feature that the top and bottom mounts are steel, leather covered, the main part of the scabbard being the usual leather-covered wood.

SOLD
A sweet little version of an Afghan pesh kabz dagger. This one is in need of restoration, missing one half of the horn pommel plate. It is smaller than usual - around 2/3rds normal size, though an adult can grip it. Due to the belt loop, I wonder if this was actually made for a European to wear as a utility knife. Priced as a restoration piece, it has some quality to it and would be worth the effort.

SOLD
A rare early Royal Engineers officer's sword, from the Crimean War/Indian Mutiny period. This example is marked to retailer Whiteman of Woolwich, which is not found on many swords, but which makes sense given that both Royal Artillery and Royal Engineers officers were trained in Woolwich, London. This sword is unusual because it has the winged motif found on Artillery and Engineers officers' blades, but is mounted on the 1845/54 infantry officer's hilt. This almost certainly means that it was for an officer of Royal Engineers between 1845 and 1857 (when the RE got their own style of hilt). The sword is in fairly good condition overall. The blade is bright and the etching is mostly clear - the blade has been very well service sharpened and remains quite sharp. The shark skin grip and wire is mostly in good condition and the brass guard only has minor deformations from active service and age. The scabbard fits it well and probably indicates that the sword was in service for quite a while. Whoever owned this sword probably served in one of the large campaigns of the 1850s. An interesting detail of the guard is that the folding section found on the earlier 1845 style hilt can here be seen to have been brazed solid, rather than the whole guard being cast from one piece as is normal. A nice sword, almost 100% certain saw active service and lots of interesting little details.

SOLD
A quality French light cavalry officer's sword, Model 1822, by Coulaux & Cie of Klingenthal. This example is probably late-19th century, perhaps 1860s to 90s. The scabbard is sadly missing. The grip is leather-covered cord and wood, in good condition for the age with only a little rubbing through of the leather. The grip wire is still intact and tight. The hilt is solid on the tang. The blade is in nice shape, though covered in 'salt and pepper' patina - not pitting as it may appear in the photos. The blade could certainly be polished bright fairly easily. A decent example of the type, with the sought-after Klingenthal attribution.

SOLD
An unusual sabre marked to Gujranwala in the Punjab (now Pakistan). The blade is of a form often found on Indian cavalry swords and usually made by either Wilkinson, Thurkle or Mole in Britain. This example is probably also a British-made blade and is of good quality, but has been locally hilted, in the style of an infantry or Rifles officer's sword, but with a star and crescent emblem and the word Gujranwala. The hilt assembly is solid on the tang (though the upper ferule looks like it has been replaced at some time in the past) and the wire and leather grip is in good condition. The blade is bright and very well sharpened, remaining sharp. No scabbard. I have never seen a sword exactly like this before and struggle to date it, but due to the similarity of the blade to other Indian swords I suspect it dates to around 1880-1910.

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German WW1 saw-back 'butcher' bayonet. This example in good condition, service sharpened, with even patina overall, uncleaned, with working spring catch. Various markings, including Erfurt and I believe manufactured in 1915.

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A Victorian light cavalry officer's sword and scabbard, by Hamburger & Rogers. This is a nice sword of the slightly more slender type. Everything is tight and generally both sword and scabbard are in good condition, with most of the steel remaining bright (though could do with cleaning) and the etching very clear for most of the blade. Unfortunately one particular part of the blade has been water damaged, resulting in pitting blocking out the etching for a few inches (see photos). However, the blade remains solid and no real material has been lost. The grip is in good condition and functionally this is a good sword which feels very nimble in the hand, by one of the top retailers of the time.

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A composite 5-ball officer's sword from the late-18th century, possibly naval. These usually feature spadroon blades, but this example has a sabre/hanger blade of around 30 inches. It is however not entirely original - the tang nut at the end of the pommel is obviously a modern replacement, though the pommel itself appears original, with some gilding remaining. The blade appears original, but has been nickel plated at some later date. From the fuller and point it appears that it may have been a shortened cavalry blade. The grip is white bone (which usually signifies naval service) and appears original. The guard may or may not be original. The entire assembly is tight and solid. Priced according to being a composite.

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A desirable Boer War Wilkinson patent solid hilt cavalry officer's sword (1896 pattern) numbered 38479 and to a named officer who fought in that campaign. This sword features Wilkinson's sought-after full-width tang and this sword saw active service in South Africa. The sword was sold to George B Ollivant of the 12th Lancers in October 1900 (an electronic copy of the Wilkinson ledger is included in the sale). Ollivant served in the Boer War and also WW1. The blade is lightly pitted all over and has been repolished, so the etching is very feint unfortunately - the 12th Lancers emblem is just visible though. However, the blade is straight and solid, and functionally perfect. The hilt is of course solid on the tang. The hilt is in rather good condition, with the guard only lightly pitted and polished bright, the grips are finely chequered and in good condition, all the silver grip wire still being present. This is a rare opportunity to grab a Wilkinson patent solid hilt with a fascinating history at a relatively modest price - if the blade were without the pitting then this would be at least a couple of hundred more.

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A very rare Royal Indian Marines officer's sword (1827/46 pattern), by Edward Thurkle, dating to 1892-1899. The Royal Indian Marines, established in 1892, were officered by British officers. Edward Thurkle, the quality sword maker, died in 1899. This sword must have belonged to one of the first generation of officers of that establishment therefore. The sword is in good condition. The blade is mostly bright, with some original polish and only a few small patches of staining and pitting. The hilt is in good condition, showing the distinctive emblem of the R.I.M. (which is also etched on the blade), the shark skin and grip wire is all intact. The scabbard is in decent condition and is steel with a brass throat, in contrast to the leather scabbards normally found with naval type swords.

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An 1896 pattern cavalry officer's sword by Wilkinson. The sword is unresearched and is numbered for the year 1897. The 35’’ blade has been heavily polished and is lightly pitted - unfortunately the polishing has removed most of the etching. You can just make out that there were some initials on the blade. It has been thoroughly service sharpened to within 11’’ of the hilt and on the back edge. This example has a slightly curved blade, unlike the later examples which were invariably straight. The hilt has some pitting but is in good condition and the there is no movement - everything is tight. The grip retains all its wiring and the majority of its shagreen, with a raised section near the pommel and a few losses near the blade. The scabbard is basically sound but has a bend in the lower third (does not affect sheathing) and some tiny corrosion holes. Overall, a solid example by the best maker of the day, with research potential, for a modest price due to the flaws.

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An unknown (possibly Brazilian) cavalry sword. It has a 34 inch blade, so cavalry length in general, which is in nice condition and a lot of original polish. The scabbard is battered and missing its throat, but it's done its job in protecting the shiny blade! There are no makers marks that I can see. The hilt is in basically sound condition, with its leather and wire intact, with light pitting to the guard and backstrap.

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An old, probably 19th century, Nepalese kukri. A good solid old example of quality, everything solid and sound. The blade has an even dimpled light pitting all over, but the hilt is in nice condition. Could certainly be improved with a little work.

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A top quality WW1 infantry officer's sword, 1897 pattern, by Wilkinson. This sword is missing its scabbard, the nickel plating on the hilt is not in great condition, with some loss and bubbling and there is some patchy staining on the foible of the blade. But it's a lovely hefty sword, service sharpened (presumably for WW1), with a lot of original polish and frost etching to the blade, which is overall in very nice condition, the shagreen and silver grip wire is all present to the grip. Everything is tight and solid and this is also Wilkinson's 'best quality' version, with the hexagonal proof slug. It is more hefty than an average 1897. Strangely there is no serial number, but I have heard that during WW1 this was sometimes neglected in the struggle to keep up with orders. A really top quality sword, about the best quality you can get for the period, priced according to the flaws in its condition (which could be improved with some work).

SOLD
A nice example of an 1890 pattern cavalry troopers' sword, marked to the Royal Horse Artillery, by Wilkinson. The blade is in good condition with no major pitting and only a few patches of staining. The hilt is firm and complete although one of the leather grip panels is more worn than the other. There are plenty of British army stamps including the broad arrow, crown inspection marks and various dates, the earliest visible is 1897. No scabbard.

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  An unusual and probably early version of the 1895 pattern infantry officer's sword. The hilt on this unusual example is thicker and more robust that the standard type and the layout/proportions of the perforated guard is different. The chequered backstrap is also more rounded than normal. The blade is plain, without etching (and still retaining a lot of original polish), so either this was either a private purchase fighting sword for an officer, or a sergeant's sword (presumably private purchase, as there are no WD government stamps). An interesting piece in nice condition, with even patina to the hilt, the grip and wire all in good condition, with a bright polished blade, solid in the hilt. It also has the scabbard and frog, ready to wear.

SOLD 
  A British Indian Army light cavalry sabre from around 1880-1910. These were developed especially for Indian cavalry regiments, so that they would have a uniform sword which shared some characteristics of both a British 1821 pattern cavalry sword and the native tulwar. The broad curved blade is a similar size and weight to an average tulwar, but the sword features the 3-bar guard for better hand protection. The grip is designed to be bare hardwood (rosewood I believe, with a lovely deep colour) and there is no backstrap - the grip is flared at the centre like many Indian tulwars. Most (or all?) of these were made to order by Mole of Birmingham and Wilkinson of London. This example is in reasonably good condition, but due to cleaning there are no maker's marks visible. There are some regimental numbers just about visible on the guard. The blade is sharp and the hilt is solid on the tang. The wood and leather scabbard, with its steel mounts, often perish with these quite rare swords, but this has its scabbard - though the curve of the scabbard is a little different to the curve of the blade (a mix up in regimental armoury maybe), so it doesn't quite go entirely in. A fairly rare sword which are usually only found in poor condition. Almost certainly made by one of the top British makers for the India Stored Depot at the end of the 19th century.

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  An unusual sword which marries an 1821 pattern three-bar light cavalry officer's hilt to a possibly-earlier thrusting blade. The blade is 32 inches and double-edged, with a narrow fuller. The resulting marriage is quite attractive I think and makes for a very nimble sword - the assembly all appears old, not recent, and is solid. The hilt probably dates to the middle of the 19th century. The blade itself is in nice condition and straight - possibly dating to the Napoleonic era or earlier. The steel of the hilt is pitted and has some remains of gold paint. The grip shagreen is in reasonable condition and most of the grip wire is intact. An unusual sword, perhaps put together for an officer who wanted a thrusting sword instead of the regulation cut and thrust sabre blade.

SOLD 
  An 18th century hunting hanger, probably German or English. This short sword is nicely made and in fairly good condition for the age. The hilt is brass, with a tortoise shell grip, and is secure on the tang. The short sabre blade is mostly bright and in overall decent condition. A nice old sword for a modest price.

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A Deane & Adams 1851 pattern revolver, featuring the improved frame shape (dating it to around 1854-55), in 54 bore. This lovely big revolver has lost all the blueing (if it was blued), but the metal has very little pitting and the walnut grip is in very good shape, with sharp chequering. The sear probably needs work, as the trigger does not engage every time and the cylinder retaining pin is a bit loose. However this is a lovely big piece, with 7.5 inch barrel, which will reward some work and this early and large form of early Adams revolver is getting harder to find.

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An immaculate Wilkinson artillery officer's sword, to named aristocratic officer of the Norfolk Artillery Militia. The 32.5 inch blade is numbered 16237 (for 1869), is in superb condition, with detailed custom etching for the Norfolk Artillery, as well as the owner's family crest and motto. The sword belonged to Captain Sir William Ffoulkes, JP, Deputy Lieutenant, High Sheriff of Norfolk, 1876, MP King’s Lynn 1880, KCVO 1904. He was a Baronet, educated at Harrow and Trinity College Cambridge, joining the Norfolk Artillery in 1869. The hilt is in as good condition as the blade, being clean and bright, with the silver grip wire and shagreen all in very good shape. The hilt is tight on the tang. The scabbard is present, though rather pitted and dark itself. A lovely sword and very nimble in the hand.

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An impressive Indian firangi, featuring a massive 40 inch blade. The blade is either an imported European backsword blade, or made in the style of such a blade. One of the double fullers contains symbols and letters (Indian) and the blade is solid in the hilt. The blade itself is bright with minimal pitting. The hilt is nicely detailed and lightly pitted from age - it has the padded hand guard still in place, which is fairly unusual. The handle and pommel section are a little loose, though seem to be firmly attached - this slight movement is probably easily fixed, perhaps with some putty in the pommel stalk, where the full-length tang end is visible looking down the end. A desirable and impressive sword; it dwarfs most other antique swords, yet is surprisingly light and nible.

SOLD
A nice quality Artillery Volunteers officer's sword, to a named officer. This sword was probably made by Mole and has the outfitter Lyons of Woolwich marked on the ricasso. The blade is in superb condition with really good quality etching. The blade is bright and very clean. The grip is also in very good condition, with all the shagreen and grip wire in place. The hilt is solid on the tang. The guard has an even brown patina, which could be cleaned or left as is, as it looks fine. The scabbard is present and relatively clean. The spine of the blade is marked to William J Dawson, of the 3rd Durham Artillery Volunteers. This is a nice sword in the hand, with a good balance and heft.

SOLD
An 1854 pattern infantry officer's sword in nice condition, with scabbard. This example has no maker or retailer's name, but is decent quality. It still has most of the black leather liner to the guard, which was an optional feature which rarely survives on antiques - it is a nice feature to still have. The hilt is in very nice condition overall, with all the shark skin and wire present. The blade is equally clean, with clear etching. This sword probably dates to the 1860s or 70s.

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A late-19th century 1854 pattern infantry officer's sword, made by Mole of Birmingham for the India Stores Depot. These were kept in regimental armouries for native officers and NCOs to use, but were government property and hence carry the ISD stamp. This is a quite chunky sword and is reassuringly robust in the hand. This example is in nice condition, with a very bright plated blade, with the blade etching remaining visible through the plating.The hilt is solid on the tang and in overall good condition, just with a few little patches of loss to the shark skin - all the grip wire is present and tight. With its matching scabbard.

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A late-Victorian officer's sword, featuring an 1892 pattern Rifles blade on an Artillery hilt. This probably indicates that the officer changed regiment (most likely a volunteers officer). The blade is dateable to a narrow period between 1892 and 1901, due to the pattern and being marked with Victoria's cypher. The hilt could be of the same date, or possibly WW1. The whole piece is in nice clean condition, everything is tight, the scabbard is clean, the blade etching clear, the shagreen and grip wire all present. A nice tidy sword.

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Rare British Indian Army cavalry sword - this type of sword were made by quality makers in Britain for Indian cavalry regiments such as Skinner's Horse. The overall construction of this is like an 1853 or 1864 pattern cavalry sword, with the same Reeves patent hilt and leather slab grips held on by five rivets. However, the blade is more curved that those regulation patterns, slightly longer at 36 inches, and the guard is a slightly asymmetrical bowl guard somewhat similar to the 1821 heavy cavalry troopers' sword. This type of sword also characteristically feature slightly shorter grips than British cavalry versions, to more closely match what native cavalry troopers were used to with native swords such as tulwars. It could benefit from further cleaning and restoration work to the leather grip slabs - one side of the grip is in quite poor condition. The blade has pitting. It lacks a scabbard (which if for Indian service may have been wood and leather). However it is an extremely unusual sword and is very imposing and big, with pleasing proportions and some potentially really interesting research to be done on it. Straight versions of these are known to have been carried by specific Indian cavalry regiments, but I have not seen another curved one like this.

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A cavalry sabre, by renowned German maker Putsch & Sohn. I'm not sure exactly what model this is, but it seems to be much rarer than the similar Italian M1860. The grip, backstrap and pommel is similar to the Italian M1833 light cavalry sabre. This example has fairly deep pitting to the hilt and scabbard, but the leather grip and grip wire is in great condition, the hilt is all rock solid on the tang and the blade is in very nice and clean condition. It is very well sharpened and remains sharp enough to cut with. The blade is free of bends and is a nice big cavalry size. Quite an unusual sword, in decent condition, by a good maker.

SOLD
A simply stunning example of a late-Victorian Royal Artillery officer's sword with everything you could hope for - made by Wilkinson, named to an officer who served in South Africa (winning the D.S.O.) and went on to become a Major General, featuring the 'Patent Solid Hilt', in superb, almost like-new condition (probably professionally refurbished during the Major General's career). Look at the photos of this sword and they will speak for themselves. Everything is almost perfect. Included in the sale is a copy of the original Wilkinson ledger showing that this sword, which was made in 1899, was sold to (later Major General) Arthur Alec Goschen, later CB, D.S.O. and two bars, DL, who served in the Second Boer War, taking part in the Orange River Colony operations and being present at Ladybrand. He won the D.S.O. during the Second Boer War. Goschen went on to serve as a Brigade Major in WW1, was based in India for a time between the wars, and served in Britain during WW2.

You can find Major General Goschen on Wikipedia here,, and in the National Portrait Gallery, amongst other places:


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A very rare Anglo-Indian cavalry sword made by Wilkinson. I have never seen another sword exactly like this. It is broadly similar to certain late-19th century Indian cavalry swords made by both Wilkinson and Mole, but with a number of key differences. The blade is a subtly different curve and with a narrower fuller than is normal. The hardwood grip is shaped somewhat differently and is flatter than others I have seen (good for edge-alignment in the cut). The guard, rather than being the normal 3-bar is actually a rare 4-bar guard. The scabbard is not wood lined, but rather just layered leather. I would have been inclined to say that this is a special order sword for either an Indian or British officer serving in India, but there are numbers stamped into the guard and symbols at the base of the blade which make me think this is an issued weapon, rather than a private purchase. Certainly a fascinating research project and a very nice and rare sword. The sharpened blade is solid in the hilt. The blade is bright, but with some patches of light pitting, including a little loss at the edge (see photos). The hilt is in very good condition considering, with the chequering on the grip still being clear. If I ever see another like this, I'll be surprised.

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A high quality late-Victorian Royal Artillery officer's sword, with silver-plated hilt and extensive service-sharpening, by Hobson. When this sword first came to me I thought that the hilt was blackened steel, but very quickly realised that it was entirely silver-plated (the backstrap seems to be solid silver). I have left some of the tarnishing in the photos to demonstrate this. The ricasso of the blade has been polished such that no outfitter/maker's name appears, but the leather scabbard has the supplier's name on it - Hobson was a top quality outfitter. The hilt is solid on the tang. The blade is bright, with a few areas of localised light blemishing, but is in nice condition with crisp and deep etching. The blade has been very extensively service sharpened and remains quite sharp - this single-bevel sharpening has by necessity removed the etching on the sharpened bevel. The shark skin remains 95% and the grip wire is all present. The silver plating is mostly in nice condition, with a few areas of crazing/lifting. The backstrap is the post-1895 type, so this sword dates to 1895-1901. A very nice sword.

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A highly unusual British cutlass with an 1845 pattern cutlass hilt married to what seems to be a modified 1796 light cavalry sabre blade. The hilt was presumably originally paired with a standard cutlass blade as the hole for the tang to go through the grip is wider than that of the cavalry sword. At some point in its history it has been paired with the longer cavalry sword, perhaps as a fighting weapon for someone, or just the navy using army surplus blades as they often did. It could conceivably have been for 'sword feats'. It has been put together firmly and there is no movement, and the marriage appears to be a 19th century one. The blade has been very heavily polished bright, leaving no markings (if there ever were any). It is in good condition, with some staining and a few tiny nicks, but no pitting. It makes normal cutlasses seem very short indeed and is a really fun sword in the hand.

SOLD
A British-made cavalry sabre for Indian cavalry, late 19th century. Many of these were made by companies like Mole in Birmingham to equip Indian cavalry regiments from about 1865 to 1918. The design was a marriage of the 1821 pattern cavalry sword hilt, with a blade inspired by the old 1796 light cavalry sabre. This was popular with Indian troops and offered cutting capacity similar to a tulwar, but with better hand protection and British mass-manufacture and quality control. This example is in rather 'worn' condition, but is solid and sound. The blade is tight in the hilt and remains fairly sharp. It has even light pitting all over. The hilt is solid, including the wooden grip, which has lost the original leather covering (as most of these do).

SOLD
A nice Victorian infantry officer's sword by Wilkinson (numbered 15382 for 1867) to a named officer. This sword, which belonged to Major John de Witt Jebb (26th Regiment of Foot/Scottish Rifles/Cameronians), was updated with the new 1895 type hilt in that year (Major Jebb was commissioned in 1867 and was still on the reserve of officers in 1902). The regiment served in South Africa and India during this period, which may explain the service sharpening. The 1 inch wide 'medium infantry' blade is very clean and bright, and also well service sharpened. The hilt is solid on the tang. The guard needs a good polish, as does the scabbard - once both are cleaned this should be a very presentable sword, as it is fundamentally in nice condition. The scabbard is a bit battered and someone seems to have removed and remounted the throat the wrong way around, which makes it a bit stiff to sheath - this should be simple to rectify. The grip shark skin is all present and the wire is intact. A nice sword with a good documented history (the Wilkinson ledger included with the sword) - once cleaned up, this will be a really great piece and worth quite a bit more than the asking price here.

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A George V WW1 period Wilkinson Royal Artillery officer's sword (numbered 52233 for around 1917). This sword has very clean metalwork, being in bright polish, with clean hilt and blade. The blade etching is clear, the hilt is solid on the tang and everything is tight. The grip retains around 60% of the shark skin (see photos) and most of the grip wire. The blade carried the hexagonal proof slig, which represented Wilkinson's 'best quality' blades. This sword is unresearched, but must have been for an officer who served in WW1 and bought an expensive sword. No scabbard.

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A late-Victorian Royal Artillery officer's sword by Wilkinson (numbered 30237 for 1890). This sword is in fairly decent condition and is a nice robust piece. The Victorian versions are more stocky in general than the later ones and this is a nice fighting sword, service sharpened. It is unresearched so far. The blade is in quite clean condition with clear etching, but would benefit from careful cleaning. The guard is somewhat pitted from rust, but is solid and sound. The hilt is totally solid on the hilt. The grip retains 90% of the shark skin and most of the grip wire. A good quality sword that would benefit from restoration. No scabbard.

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A British 1845 pattern naval cutlass, dating to between 1845 and about 1880. These are getting harder to track down and this is a decent example. It has some pitting and a dark patina overall. The blade is totally solid in the cast iron hilt, which has some of the original black paint remaining. The blade is free of bends, but has no markings visible. The guard is in good shape and everything is tight. Despite these obviously being very numerous swords in their time, they were generally treated harshly and then discarded as junk or left to rust. This one could do with some cleaning, but is a nice piece in honest condition.

SOLD
A very high quality and rare infantry officer's sword, from Cipriano Castro's rule of Venezuela, between 1899 and 1908. The design of the sword shows various influences; British and Spanish principally. The general style of the hilt is that of a British 1822 infantry officer's sword, with the arms of Venezuela. The shark skin grip and wire wrap is also basically in the British style, but with more turns of wire than you normally find on British swords. The blade is very high quality, with gilding on the national coat of arms, and it is of 'Toledo' style, with double-fullers for the first half, and then a sharp sabre blade with false edge for the second half. This style of blade was used on some special order swords in Britain, but it was a distinctly Spanish style originally. The execution of the whole sword is to a very high standard - I would presume for a senior officer or official under Castro. The steel scabbard is nickel plated and has very ornate brass fittings. The condition in general is very good. Flaws to mention are that some bits of the grip wire are missing and when sheathing the sword it sometimes gets a little stuck on something inside (but usually sheathes fine). The blade, which is about 31 inches long and about 3/4 inch wide, is solid in the hilt and despite this looking like a dress sword, the blade is actually sharp. A very attractive sword or very high quality - probably Spanish manufacture I would say, or perhaps German. There cannot be many Venezuelan officers swords of 1899-1908 and this high quality around.

SOLD
An 18th or 19th century Indian tulwar with an unusually curved blade and silver decoration to the hilt. The hilt of this sword has floral decoration on it, in white metal or silver-alloy, most of which is remaining. Further cleaning would really bring this up. The blade is a good quality shamshir type, with a tiny bit of movement in the hilt (fixable with heating the hilt) and some areas of pitting, including some loss to the cutting edge in places, which is otherwise sharp. An unusual and quality tulwar, deserving of restoration.

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An unusual offering - a pair of 1827 pattern Rifles officers' (or NCO?) swords. A bit of a mystery, as both swords were purchased together and both have no markings on the blade. Whether this is through design or being polished off it is hard to say, but it seems like they were made plain - perhaps for issue to NCOs. While they are not exactly the same, they are very similar and both have two letters (a ‘P’?) stamped into their backstraps. Both swords date from the mid Victorian period and have slim plain blades with brass proof discs. The blades are sound with some patches of light pitting and marking but nothing major and everything is solid, with no movement. The hilts, with their light infantry bugle, have all their wire complete but have lost some shagreen and the both have very slight damage to the grip under the pommel. A brace of swords!

SOLD
A good quality late-Victorian Royal Artillery officer's sword, by Mole of Birmingham. This sword features the post-1895 style chequered backstrap, but has the VR cypher, so much date to between 1895 and 1901. The blade is in nice clean condition, with only minor blemishes and very clear and detailed etching. The blade is solid in the hilt. The hilt itself is also in nice condition, but would benefit from cleaning. The nickel plating has dulled and flaked in places, but is fairly good for the age. The grip is very tidy, with all the shagreen and grip wire. The scabbard is in very nice condition for the age. A good example of this sword type, Victorian, by one of the top makers of the day.

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A British (or perhaps Indian) mountain artillery sabre (or perhaps light cavalry!). There is actually quite a lot of uncertainty around these swords - they are usually described as Indian Mountain Artillery swords, and they were certainly carried by them. However they were also carried by Indian light cavalry sometimes, as well as perhaps artillery garrisons. The style of hilt was in use by British gunners in the Napoleonic era and in the Victorian era it was married to a 1796 light cavalry style sabre blade. The result is a very attractive sword, featuring a cast iron grip, brass guard and broad curved blade. This example is in average condition, with light pitting to the blade and grip. The blade has been service sharpened and it is solid in the hilt. No scabbard. A nice sword and not common - an impressive sword in the hand!

SOLD
A very rare Napoleonic era British officer's sabre, based on the 1796 pattern light cavalry officer's sabre with the addition of a more protective shell hilt. This is part of a family of swords which rarely come up for sale and it is not known exactly what kind of officer carried them. Some researchers have surmised that they were carried by Rifle officers prior to 1803, or indeed that they relate to some specific Scottish regiment. Evidence is currently inconclusive. What we do know is that they were carried during the Napoleonic Wars by some British officers and are based on the 1796 pattern light cavalry sabre, with a shell guard that is very similar to the 1796 heavy cavalry dress sword, but made larger and thicker. They were clearly purpose-made this way, as the knucklebow and quillon are specially shaped to fit inside the shell guard. This example is in very good condition, with a bright blade and clear etching, showing both the GR cypher of George III and a stand of arms including the Union Flag. There are a few very localised bits of pitting, but otherwise the blade is very good. The hilt is also in very nice condition, with all the brass in good shape and some original gilding remaining. The silver grip wire is almost entirely complete - just missing a few strands at the pommel end. The hilt is quite tight on the tang, with a little bit of movement, but not much. No scabbard unfortunately (when the scabbards are present, they are leather with brass mounts). A very rare sword in very nice condition.

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A variant on the 1845 naval cutlass, with scabbard. This example seems to have a non-ferous (bronze?) grip, rather than the usual cast iron type. This may mean that it was intended for private shipping or merchant navy, rather than Royal Navy, and it has no stamps or markings, supporting this theory. It is an unusual variant anyway. The guard is the usual black-painted iron and there seems to be the remains of paint on the grip. The blade is very darkly patinated, but in decent condition, with minimal pitting for a cutlass. The blade is rock solid in the hilt. The scabbard is in average condition, but is unfortunately lacking the end piece. An unusual and hefty cutlass in decent condition.

SOLD
A superior quality, perhaps private purchase, 1853 pattern cavalry sword. At first sight this is a regular 1853 pattern cavalry sword, but the details tell a different story. It has a 34.5 inch, instead of 35.5 inch, blade of robust form. The grip is made of higher quality chequered material which is flatter than normal, aiding edge-alignment and countering the main criticism of the big round 1853 grip. The guard has the form of an 1821 cavalry officer's sword, rather than the simpler trooper's guard, with incised lines between the branches of the guard and a dividing bar on the thumb side. In the hand this is a really authoritative sword which screams quality. However there are no marks anywhere that I can see, so I have no idea as to the maker or intended purpose. Perhaps an officer's private purchase, or an NCO private purchase sword, or perhaps even mounted police. The blade is in great condition, bright and with minimal age damage. The guard and scabbard have been pitted by rust, but are both solid and sound otherwise. The grips are like new almost; very crisp chequering. I would keep this sword if I didn't already have another like it (my other made by Parker, Field & Sons).

SOLD
A WW2 German parade bayonet/dagger, by Rich ABR Herder of Solingen. The blade in very nice condition, the hilt in generally decent condition, though with frosting to the nickel of the guard and pommel. The scabbard with patina and pitting.

SOLD
An immaculate and rare Edward VII Royal Army Medical Corps officer's sword, 1892 pattern, by Gaunt & Sons/Edward Thurkle. This model of sword is rare, due to there not being a great number of officers of the RAMC, but this one is especially rare for being an Edward VII example - most are George V (due to the great number of officers recruited during WW1). On top of that, this sword and scabbard are in superb condition for their 100 year old age. The blade is in original polish, with crisp and detailed frost-etching, including the maker/retailer's details and the RAMC motto and emblem. There are only a few of the tiniest spots on the blade, but this is easily modern parade standard - it looks almost new. The hilt is equally in great condition, with clean brass fittings, all the shark skin perfect and the brass grip wire all in place and tight. The hilt is of course solid on the tang. The scabbard is also in very good condition and if this were still the current pattern for the RAMC (they changed to the 1897 pattern infantry officer's sword after WW1) then it would be considered parade standard condition.

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A really lovely big Victorian light cavalry officer's sword by Manton of London & Calcutta. This sword is in beautiful condition and really only has two flaws; it has no scabbard and there are a few scuffs on the shark skin. Otherwise, it's fantastic for the age and still sharp. The hilt is bright and rock solid, with all the grip wire and the original leather washer. The blade is bright and sharp, at the full 35+ inches size. The etching is very clear. Hard to date this sword, but I'd say from the shape of the grip that it's fairly early for the type - perhaps 1850s. There is a good chance that the blade was made by Reeves of Birmingham and supplied to Manton for a British officer serving in India.

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A WW1 infantry officer's sword, by Wilkinson (numbered 46845 for around 1914). This sword features the hexagonal proof slug of Wilkinson's 'best quality' range. It dates to around the start of WW1 and has been service sharpened, but not researched yet. The condition is average - there is some localised pitting to the blade, but nearly all of the etching is clear and the blade would be greatly improved by cleaning. The hilt is all solid and sound, with very light pitting and patina to the guard. The shark skin and silver grip wire is in very good condition, as is the plated backstrap. This sword should clean up very well. The scabbard is probably a modern replacement, but of the correct type, painted black and in very good condition.

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A late-Victorian Royal Artillery officer's sword, to a named officer who served throughout WW1. This sword, with a blade in very good condition, was retailed by Daniels of Woolwich (where the Royal Artillery were based) and was made by WKC of Solingen, both clearly visible on the ricasso. This sword was sold to me directly by the family of the officer and it has never been offered for sale before. The officer who owned this sword was Lieutenant Colonel Arthur Lionel Routh (1877-1945), whose initials ALR can be seen on the blade. He was commissioned in April 1900. Lt. Col Routh served in the Boer War in 1902 and then during WW1, being present at the Battle of Ypres. The blade of this sword is in very nice clean condition, other than a tiny bit of rust at the base, which would be easy to clean. The grip is also very good, with all the shark skin and wire intact. The surface of the hilt and scabbard have both been exposed to damp air and have gained a brown patina, which could potentially be polished off, but actually looks very pleasing as is. The hilt is solid on the tang. Lt. Col. Routh wearing this sword originally (where you can see the original bright polish of hilt and scabbard):



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A quality 18th/19th century Indian tulwar. The narrow blade is sharp and springy, though with areas of pitting, with an interesting emblem near the hilt (pictured). The hilt itself is covered in silver inlay decoration which remains over most of the surface. It has a decently sized hilt and fits my hand, and the hilt is totally solid on the tang, with all the original pitch still in place. This would have originally been owned by someone quite wealthy and certainly further cleaning to the blade would enhance its appearance and value. A nice sword.

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A really rare 60th Rifles (King's Own Royal Rifle Corps) regimentally-etched Rifles officer's sword, retailed by Johnstone of London & Dublin. The 60th Rifles were a very active and highly regarded regiment, involved in the Indian Mutiny, Taku Forts (China), Zulu War, Boer War, Egyptian Campaign etc. 60th Rifles swords are prized above probably any other Rifle regiment, due to the regiment's very interesting history. This example is in great condition and has been service sharpened, so very probably saw active service in one or more of the above campaigns. It is difficult to date this sword exactly, but based on my experience I would say it dates to the 1850s or 60s - later swords tend to have straighter grips and chequering on the thumb-placer of the backstrap. The blade is bright and clean, with very clear etching overall. The regiment is etched on both sides of the blade in different ways. The hilt is tidy and clean, as well as being solid on the tang. The shark skin and grip wire is all present. The scabbard is a later replacement, I suspect to make the sword fit for parade use in more recent decades. The nickel-plated scabbard is the correct type and fits well however, and is a vast improvement over having no scabbard.

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  A nice 1796 pattern light cavalry officer's sword with shark skin grip, by Osborn. 

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A super-rare 1821 pattern cavalry trooper's sword by Wooley, Sargant and Fairfax, who were only in operated from 1826 to 1834. This model of sword was in use until 1853 officially, and in reality until a few years after that. Therefore this sword could have been in regimental use for at least two decades. There are no regimental markings that I can see and these would have most likely been on the scabbard, which is lost unfortunately. The blade is in nice condition, but in need of a clean (I have left it untouched). It is straight and full size (35 inches). The hilt is quite solid on the tang, with only the tiniest movement in the guard (not the handle). There is a light rust on some of the hilt, which like the blade would benefit from a clean. Some of the hilt's surface has been sanded clean in the distant past - something that would have been done by a regimental armourer if a sword got rusty in use. The grip is solid bare wood - usually these were leather-covered, but I'm not sue this one ever was by the looks of it. The wood has a lovely shiny surface. A rare sword and in solid condition - would benefit from restoration.

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A tidy example of a 1796 pattern light cavalry officer's sabre. There is no decoration to the blade, nor a maker's name, but this is clearly a good quality piece. The blade has a nice patina and is in good condition overall - it is a very light blade, perhaps the lightest of this type that I've held. There is a slight 'ripple' in the blade about halfway down where I think someone's cut has twisted on impact. The edge is quite sharp and this sword is likely to have been carried in the Napoleonic Wars. The hilt is in nice condition, with nearly all of the leather grip covering remaining, except at the very pommel tip, where a chip has come out (see photos). Even the brass grip wire remains. The handle is tight on the tang, though there is some slight movement to the guard, due to the leather washer shrinking over 200 years. This sword has some flaws, but these are highly desirable weapons of a fascinating period, getting harder to source and they are 200 years old!

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An early Victorian 1821 pattern heavy cavalry officer's sword, by William Buckmaster of London. This is a nice early example, probably from about the 1850s, with a plain blade. The blade doesn't appear to have ever been etched and there is no retailer/maker on the ricasso, but the proof slug has the unmistakable WB for Buckmaster - a quality maker. The whole sword and scabbard are in quite nice condition, with a bright blade only having a few dark stains. The blade is tight in the hilt. The leather washer is in place. The guard has a nice patina and is in good shape. The grip is pretty much perfect, with the skin and wire intact. The backstrap and pommel are also in nice condition. A good example of the type, from the Crimean War/Indian Mutiny sort of period. Not a common pattern before 1896.

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A very shiny example of a late-Victorian artillery officer's sword. There is a retailer's name on the ricasso, but I cannot quite read it. The whole sword has been plated, meaning that it looks shiny like new - it has made the blade etching a bit feint, but you can still see it all. There is a little blemishing and loss of plating near the tip, but nothing bad. The whole sword and scabbard are very clean for the age, with a bright blade, firm in the hilt, the hilt is all bright and clean, the grip and wire are basically perfect and the shark skin is still quite dark. Even the leather scabbard covering and sword knot is all in good condition. A very clean sword for the age and very nimble in the hand.

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A clean example of an 1827 pattern (post-1845) Rifles officer's sword, probably for Volunteer Rifles. Probably Solingen-made for the British market. This sword is complete with a tidy scabbard and featured a clean, bright, well-etched blade in good condition. The hilt was originally blacked or browned and this has given an overall dark patina with some areas buffed bright. The grip is in good condition, with all the shagreen and wire. The hilt is solid on the tang and the sword sheathes well.

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A lovely clean Victorian infantry officer's sword by top maker Mole of Birmingham. Probably dating to around 1870 or 1880 this robust example is in very tidy condition, with a relatively bright blade, showing all the etching clearly, as well as the maker's name. The blade is tight in the hilt and the guard has the tiniest bit of movement (but not the grip). The guard and brass work is all in good order, the shark skin is completely clean and with nice original rough texture - the wire is 90% intact, with only a couple of the thin strands missing. Complete in its scabbard.

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An early Wilkinson Royal Engineers hilted sword, numbered 10093 (for 1859), with a Rifles blade. The Wilkinson ledger for this sword is included in the sale and lists the sword as being a Rifles sword (which the numbered blade is), having been sold to H. Madden of the Highgate Rifles. However, despite trawling through the records, I cannot identify this individual, nor indeed explain why the Rifles blade is now mounted on a Royal Engineers hilt. The sword appears to have been carried ins service, as it is service sharpened, and shows all the signs of hard campaigning (dented scabbard where it hits the leg etc). My guess is that somebody, maybe H. Madden signed up to the new Rifle Volunteers in 1859 (the year it was started and the year the sword dates to) and then left and passed or sold the sword to a friend who was joining the Royal Engineers. The RE hilt looks early - not later than the 1860s I would say. In any case, the obvious flaw in this sword an an antique is the missing shark skin on the grip - it has completely perished. The wood of the hilt is stable, but would benefit from cosmetic filling. However, despite this, all the grip wire is in place, the hilt is otherwise solid and sound, tight on the tang, the blass of the hilt is all solid and in shape. But most impressive is the blade, which is in good shape overall with just on patch of heavy pitting, which I have pictured. The etching is extremely clear and detailed. A nice sword with some interesting research potential. Could benefit from some more cleaning.

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A Victorian 1897 pattern infantry officer's sword, retailed by Milton & Jones. This sword must date to 1897-1901 and is in reasonable condition. The hilt was obviously originally browned (like a gun barrel) and about 50% of this remains, the rest of the hilt having been buffed to steel. The attractive VR cypher is crisp on the guard and the whole hilt is solid, with all the shark skin and most of the grip wire remaining. The blade is very bright with a lot of original polish remaining, with crisp frost etching decoration. The scabbard has suffered and lost nearly all the leather covering, but the wood, the metal fittings and the leather frog remain.

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A 19th century Indian light cavalry sword. These swords originated during and after the Indian Mutiny, when 1821 pattern three-bar hilts started to be combined with 1796 light cavalry sabre-type blades. In the following decades the combination of three-bar hilt and broad sabre blade remained popular for Indian cavalry and they were made in many variations, both in Britain and India. This seems to be an Indian-made example, perhaps for a princely state, and the regimental markings are in local script rather than Arabic numerals and Roman letters. The hilt is solid on the tang, just with a tiny bit of movement to the brass guard. The wooden grip is in quite nice condition, with only a couple of little bits of minor damage. The brass grip wire is in place. The sharpened blade is lightly pitted, with a somewhat rounded tip, but is in average condition overall. The scabbard is present, though could benefit from some restoration.

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A highly rare and desirable Indian large shield (18th or 19th century), made of hide. These don't come up for sale very often. This example is a bit warped, but retains most of its original domed form. The black hide - perhaps buffalo - retains a nice black surface colour and texture. The original handle straps are still intact. All four grip bosses are still solid and secure (these often fall off with age and abuse). Each of the metal fitting on the surface is intricately decorated (see photos), but it has been covered with some kind of varnish which is obscuring this decoration - this should be carefully cleaned off with a chemical remover, but I have left as found. A real gem - large ones like this (26 inches or thereabouts) are really hard to find in the UK, especially in this condition.

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An interesting Victorian infantry officer's sword with heraldic crest to a named officer (Morton Calverley Coles of the Queen's Royal West Surrey Regiment of Foot), by Wilkinson. The blade dates to 1884 (numbered 25758) and the hilt was updated to meet the new regulations in 1895 (it would have been an 1854 pattern brass hilt when first made). The condition of the sword itself is average - on one hand it has bits of loss to the shagreen, the tip of the blade is quite pitted, it has a little rust damage here and there and overall could do with some TLC. On the other hand, the sword is solid and sound, the blade tight in the tang and well service sharpened, the grip wire is all there and the blade is in pretty good condition overall with clear etching. The scabbard is present, but in a sorry state and in need of repair. The overall condition is reflected in the price, but the sword is top quality Wilkinson and identifyable to an officer and therefore a service history. An electronic copy of the Wilkinson ledger is included in the price and verifies the officer (cross-verified by the heraldic crest which relates to the Coles family).

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A really pretty and quite unusual 1854 pattern infantry officer's sword. At first sight, this might be mistaken for a piquet or levee weight sword, due to its narrow proportions. However I'm fairly sure that this is actually one officer's particular preference for a lighter and nimbler thrusting sword. The proof disc (not usually found on piquet weight dress swords) identifies the maker as Pillin, a rival of Wilkinson and the straight, narrow blade has been well service sharpened, with a needle-like tip. In addition, it comes with a well-fitted service scabbard which has obviously been carried on service. The blade is in lovely condition, as are the guard and backstrap, which feature an impressive amount of the gilt wash still on the surface of the brass (hence the very gold colour in the photos). The grip is overall good, with 90% of the shark skin remaining (and where patches have worn off, the wood underneath has been coloured black to blend in). The gilded grip wire is all present. A really lovely sword that shows all the signs of active service, yet overall very good condition.

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A lightweight 1845 pattern infantry officer's sword, dating to between 1845 and around 1860. There is a London retailer's name on the ricasso, but I cannot read it. The blade etching may indicate it was made by Mole of Birmingham, or perhaps Reeves. This sword lacks a scabbard, but is in reasonable condition, featuring a plated blade with most of the plating intact. Therefore the blade is bright for the most part, though the etching is a bit feint under the plating. The hilt folding section (drop) has lost its internal spring, but the hinge is secure. The grip shagreen and wire is all in good condition. The sword seems to have been service sharpened. The hilt is basically tight on the tang, though the backstrap has a tiny amount of movement. Priced according to the above.

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A nice Victorian light cavalry officer's sword retailed by Webb & Bonello of Old Bond Street, London. This is in the smaller size, with approximately a 33 inch blade, and the blade markings make me think it was probably made to order by Mole of Birmingham. Overall it is in nice condition, though with dark patina overall and a little pitting to a couple of places on the blade. The hilt was probably browned and this explains the very dark colour now. The hilt is solid on the tang and the blade is straight. The blade etching is very clear and crisp, and unusually intricate. The grip shagreen and wire is all in great condition. No scabbard and one small notch in the false edge. A nice sword.

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A very attractive and unusual Rifles officer's sword, to the South Indian Railways Rifle Volunteers, sold by Hobson & Sons, made by quality maker Pillin of London. This sword must date to 1892-1901 and is in very nice condition, with a bright blade, all the dark shark skin and silver grip wire, a bright guard and the leather-covered wooden field scabbard has been lacquered. Pillin's etching is very distinctive and although seeming quite faint in photos is very crisp and precise. Everything is tight and solid. A nice sword with potential for some interesting research - due to the specific nature of the unit and timeframe, it might be possible to ascribe to an individual.

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A good example of an infantry officer's sword, where the 1845 style blade has been updated in 1895 with the new hilt. The blade is by Henry Wilkinson and numbered 19468, for 1874, though unfortunately the Wilkinson ledger does not record the name of the officer. The hilt is pitted from rust, all the grip wire is missing and the scabbard has lost some of the outer leather covering. However the sword is completely solid, the shark skin is good, the hilt is all tight on the tang, the chequered backstrap is good and the blade retains about 90% of the original polish. The blade is really the highlight of this sword and is a nice choppy example, with very crisp and clear etching. There are some rust spots, but I have stabilised these and they could be cleaned off with care. A nice sword in the hand.

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A rare design of Royal Navy officer's sword, dating to WW1, service sharpened and of Wilkinson's best quality (hexagonal proof slug). This sword is of an especially rare type, featuring a solid guard instead of the usual folding type (for extra strength on fighting swords), with an alternative locking mechanism on the scabbard. Overall it is a more hefty sword than most naval officer's swords of this time and the design is intended to provide a sturdier fighting weapon than the normal regulation design. The blade is numbered 43771, for around 1914, and is unresearched. This is one of the last generation of naval swords that were actually made with an expectation of combat and that this one has been extensively service-sharpened means the officer almost certainly went to war in WW1. I'm sure this sword will be an interesting one to research. The hilt is all in fantastic condition, with most gilding remaining to the brass, solid on the tang, the shark skin and grip wire all present and the original white colour of the grip remaining. Even the sword knot is complete and intact, though obviously worn with age. The blade is 80% in very good condition, with outstanding quality deep etching. Unfortunately the scabbard has been damaged at one point in the sword's past and this has allowed water in, with corresponding deep pitting to one region of the blade. It also means that the sword only sheathes to within about 1 inch of fully (see photos). This is all represented in the price - this sword would be twice this price otherwise. This is a really, really rare sword.

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A nice 1896 pattern cavalry officer's sword by Wilkinson, dated to WW1 and service sharpened. This George V-marked sword is numbered to post-1914, so was presumably ordered by an officer who did not like the new 1912 pattern cavalry officer's sword. That is has been service sharpened means it was probably carried in WW1, though the serial number is unresearched so far. This is a good example of the type, by top maker Wilkinson and will a blade in very nice condition. Most of the original polish remains, the etching is crisp and clear and the sharpened edge is in good condition, with only a couple of very small nicks. The hilt is solid on the tang, the guard with some light pitting, but sound. The grip skin and silver wire is all in good condition. Lacking its wooden scabbard. A nice big solid sword, of really nice quality.

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A Royal Artillery officer's sword, by Wilkinson, identified to a significant owner, numbered 29781 (for 1889). I haven't needed to ask for the Wilkinson ledger entry for this sword because it is obvious who owned it - the blade is etched W F O'C. That can only be Sir Wiliam Frederick Travers O'Connor‏ (often listed simply as Sir Frederick O'Connor). O'Conner, according to Hart's Annual Army List, served on the North-West Frontier campaign of 1897-8, including the engagement at Landakai, Chagru Kotal and Dargai. A prisoner of war in Persia in World War I, he served on special duties in Siberia in 1918 and was British Envoy in Nepal from 1921 to 1925. He was knighted on his retirement from the Indian Political Department in 1925, after which he pursued widespread interests. He was a close friend of Walt Disney and British royalty, and his keen interest in music led to the composition of published songs. The sword itself is all solid and sound, with the original field service scabbard in Indian style, though it does have a level of pitting on all its surface. The staining has left this black patching you can see in the photos, which perhaps could be improved by professional restoration, but as it is the etching is still mostly visible. The shark skin grip and grip wire is mostly present and correct and the hilt is solid on the tang. The blade is extensively service sharpened. This sword is really historically interesting and O'Connor is a fascinating figure to research, who has left various written texts and music behind. If this sword were in cleaner condition I would be asking twice this price.
You can see O'Connor in photographs online, including here: hthttps://www.bonhams.com/auctions/16854/lot/355/

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An Italian M1860 cavalry sabre, by Schnitzler and Kirschbaum of Solingen. The whole sword appears to have been cleaned, but it could benefit from some fine attention with Autosol or suchlike. The big 35" is fundamentall in good condition and the maker's mark, S&K, is clear. The whole hilt is in nice condition, with all of the leather remaining to the grip, which is fairly unusual with these swords. The hilt is solid on the tang and the pommel nut is able to be unscrewed, to enable dismounting of the hilt for cleaning. The scabbard is present, though could do with a clean.

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An 1845 pattern infantry officer's sword, with blade made by quality maker Thurkle of London (from the proof disc). This sword dates to c.1845-1860 and is in overall nice condition. The only flaw is that the grip has lost the original shark skin and has subsequently been varnished, but actually this looks very nice and it's all solid and sound. The blade is in very clean condition, with deep crisp etching. The hilt is solid on the tang and the folding guard drop works perfectly. The guard retains a good shape and the backstrap is tight, with crisp decoration. No scabbard.

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A superb 1897 pattern infantry officers sword, by Wilkinson, owned by Arthur Salisbury Browne Roberts, of the elite Corps of Guides. The hilt is silver plated with the VR cypher picked out in copper and the grip retains all its shagreen and silver wiring. The blade is very finely etched and is good condition, with only one small patch of pitting and some very light staining. The blade is numbered 36032 for 1898 and has Victorias cypher, the Corps of Guides emblem, the initials A B R and the Roberts crest. The Wilkinson ledger entry has not been applied for, because it was obvious who the owner was from the details on the sword. There is one quirk to the sword; at some point the hilt has been dismantled for cleaning and the thumb stop has been put back on reverse way round. No scabbard. The Corps of Guides, formed in 1846 on the North West frontier of India, uniquely comprised both infantry and cavalry units. It was considered an elite regiment and has a fascinating history. A really rare sword.

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A Victorian Royal Engineers officer's sword, by Robert Mole & Sons of Birmingham. This is a fairly tidy example, with its scabbard, probably dating to around the 1880s. Unfortunately it has one area of pitting on the blade (pictured) which partially obscures some of the etching for a few inches, but other than this the blade is in nice bright condition, with otherwise clear etching and it is tight in the hilt. The brass 1857 hilt retains a good shape and the backstrap and brass tang nut are all sound. The grip wire and shark skin is all present, the the skin is quite faded and would benefit from some nourishment. The leather washer is in place and the field scabbard is in good condition for the age.

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A tidy Edwardian 1896 pattern cavalry officer's sword, dating to 1901-1910, with a blade by top maker Pillin of London (retailed by Jones, Chalk & Dawson of London). The sword is in very good condition overall except for one patch of light pitting on the blade (see photos) and a few minor spots elsewhere on the blade. Otherwise the blade is in original polish and bright, with clearly defined etching and a lot of mirror surface remaining. The blade is rock solid in the hilt. The hilt is in very good condition, with a nice bright guard, showing all the engraved decoration to the scroll design. The grip has all the silver wire and shark skin perfect, almost like new, and the backstrap and pommel have sharp chequering still, to maintain a solid grip in action. The field scabbard is in reasonable condition for the age. A nice big sword at a very reasonable price due to the patch of pitting - apart from which it is in very good condition.

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A good example of the famous 1908 pattern cavalry sword, dated to WW1 and service sharpened. The blade is marked to maker Sanderson Brothers & Neubold Limited, the blade carries three Government inspection stamps from Enfield, the War Department arrow of acceptance into service and the manufacture date of 4/16 (April 1916). Together with the service sharpening, this means that it certainly saw active service in WW1. The scabbard is in quite decent condition and the leather washer is in place. The hilt is solid and the vulcanite grip is in good condition. A nice honest example of a sword which is decreasing in availability and increasing in value every year.

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A really lovely tulwar, of obvious quality. When this sword came to be it was black all over, but that was just dirt which cleaned off easily. I was very surprised to discover that the blade was mostly still bright under the dirt, still sharp, and the hilt was covered in silver decoration. The bright silver-coloured decoration you can see in the photos is not steel, it's 'white metal' (some silver alloy). This tulwar is quite surprising in that because it is fairly narrow you expect it to be light, but in fact the blade is quite thick, somewhat like a katana, so that it has quite a heft to it - not the usual flat blades you find on most tulwar. The blade also has a slightly Turkish look to it, with raised yelman, or false-edge, and deep fuller. The hilt is solid on the hilt and the hilt fits my hand. A really nice sword that I'm only moving on to make space for other things. It would certainly benefit from a bit of further cleaning, which I haven't had time to do. It also has some script on the spine, which contains the name of a regional governor and a place name - a very interesting research possibility.

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A gorgeous Wilkinson patent solid hilt light cavalry officer's sword, marked to the Queen's Own 4th Hussars, sold to Henry J F Newbould of the 4th Hussars in January 1894 (a fellow officer of Winston Churchill, who was in the same regiment). This sword ticks so many boxes - a numbered Wilkinson to a named officer, but also regimentally marked, which is unusual, and to a good regiment, plus it's a desirable patent solid hilt. The hilt is absolutely rock solid on the hilt of course, the guard, backstrap and blade all have an even patina (which could be brightened with careful cleaning in the future). The etching is clear. The blade is straight and sound. The grips are in very good condition with sharp chequering. Nearly all the silver grip wire is still in place (missing two strands at the bottom groove). Plus, this sword was certainly in the presence of Winston Churchill when he was a young officer, who joined the 4th Hussars very close to Newbould. In the hand this sword feels chunky and it is quite rigid, with a straight blade primarily for thrusting. Sold with the Wilkinson ledger entry.

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A really excellent example of a British-made tulwar for Indian cavalry service, by top maker Mole of Birmingham. These British-made tulwars are not very common and this is the cleanest example I have seen, with a bright blade and hilt, with nice patina. The springy blade is solid in the hilt (these are peened as well as the usual tulwar glue) and remains relatively sharp.The maker's mark is clearly stamped. The line decoration on the hilt is all well defined still. A rare piece, dating to around 1880-1900 I believe.

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A British-made (by Reeves of Birmingham) 1821 pattern light cavalry trooper's sword, made on contract for the Portugese Army. This is a really nice big and solid sword, in overall clean condition. However, the scabbard (although being the correct type) doesn't quite match the curvature of the blade and therefore doesn't fully sheath - this is reflected in the price. Even without the scabbard, the sword is a good one however. The blade and hilt are both very tidy and clean and could be buffed to a brighter finish easily. The grip is basically perfect as well, with all the shark skin and grip wire. The big 35 inch blade is impressive.

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Sort of a British sword and sort of not! This is one of the rarest Wilkinson troopers' swords you can find - made on contract for the Egyptian Army when it was under British control, some time at the end of the 19th century. Sword collecters will instantly recognise the shape as that of a French M1822 light cavalry sabre, which the Egyptians wanted for their cavalry - so Wilkinson made them. This is one of the only ways that you'll get a French/US styled cavalry trooper's sword made by Wilkinson and this example is in wonderful condition. The blade is perfect, like new. The maker's mark is crisp. The hilt is rock solid and in equally great condition. The brass is aged, but perfect. The shark skin is 100% perfect. The grip wire is all there and tight. The only negative to say is that the scabbard was varnished at some point in the past and some moisture got underneath the varnish, causing the crazing you can see in the photos. However, I have cleaned the varnish mostly off and the crazing will easily polish out with a bit of elbow grease and Autosol.

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A clean example of a British Indian Army light cavalry sabre. These were originally made from the 1870s, but photographs and records show that they were still being made and used until the end of WW1. Many of them carry the same RGB maker's mark as this example (the maker has not been identified yet). These are really nice swords in the hand, having a blade somewhat like a chunky 1796 light cavalry sabre, mounted on a robust example of the 1821 pattern light cavalry hilt. The hilt is rock solid on the tang and in overall good condition with even patina, just with a patch of the shark skin missing on one side (see photos). The blade is in night bright condition, with just a little bit of pitting here and there, but generally good and still quite sharp.

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A rare Victorian 1889 pattern sergeant's sword made by Wilkinson. The 32.5” beefy straight blade is in good condition although with a dark patina and some areas of staining. It is marked with an issue date of 1893, various inspection marks, the broad arrow of the War department, the bend test marking and the ’sold out of service’ arrows. The thick hilt is in excellent condition with all of its shagreen and wiring and a lovely crisp Victoria cypher. No scabbard unfortunately.

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A nice big 1821 pattern heavy cavalry officer's sword (post-1845 type blade), in need of some attention. This sword seems to be fairly early to me - probably 1850s or 1860s - but the maker/retailer's name is very faint and I cannot read it. It seems to be a London address though. The blade is bright, though could do with gentle cleaning, the etching quite faint. The blade is service sharpened extensively and it still quite sharp - it is also solid in the hilt. The hilt is overall in solid condition, but the guard requires cleaning, as it has some active surface rust. The grip is in really good condition, with basically all the shark skin and grip wire. The scabbard is in decent condition, just with a few dings and in need of a clean. Overall a good sword and a nice little project to add value.

SOLD
A French 1822 light cavalry trooper's sword, in need of attention. This would make a good project - hence the price. The blade is in good shape and worth the price alone. It has the attractive secondary fuller and is the massive 35+ inches long. The hilt is lose on the tang (though cannot come off) because somebody has dismounted it to re-cover the grip with new leather and wire, as well as adding a new leather washer. Unfortunately they didn't do a very good job and didn't mount the hilt back on the tang very well, and so it is wobbly from side to side. The sword as is would look perfectly fine hung on the wall, but if someone wanted a fairly easy project and to make this into a fully functional weapon again then they just have to re-mount the hilt properly (and I'd suggest using thinner leather on the grip). Peening 19th century hilts onto tangs is relatively easy, because the tangs are soft iron. As stated, as a cheap antique displat sword this is fine as is, but with a little work you could have a really nice functional sword again.

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An 1854 pattern infantry officer's sword, marked to quality outfitters Hobson & Sons, with a proof slug showing it was probably made by top maker Pillin. The blade also has the officer's initials, so it may be possible to identify who carried it. Overall the sword is in solid condition, though the blade has mottled areas of patina and pitting. The etching however remains pretty clear and the blade is straight and solid in the hilt. The hilt is in quite good condition, with most of the shark skin and grip wire, and the brass parts of the hilt are solid and in decent shape. The scabbard is in reasonable condition. Overall this is a good sword and would reward some TLC.

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A 19th century Indian tulwar. The 30” blade is heavily pitted and has been cleaned but armourers/makers marks are visible on both sides of the blade which is still very sharp. It is solid in the hilt and has a very slight bend.The hilt is decorated with foliage and a bird motif which continues under the pommel. There is decoration at the end of the quillons and on the pommel cap.

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An African short sword, using an imported European cutlass blade. The leather of the scabbard is very dry and coming away from the wooden scabbard core, but the weapon itself is solid, with the hilt tight on the tang. The blade is nice, with a good heft and broad, shallow fuller. I don't know exactly where this is originally from or the age, but given the state of the leather and style of the blade, it must be relatively old. It came with a variety of 19th century items. I would guess not later than 1920s and possibly late-19th century.

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A good WW1 era cavalry officer's sword, 1912 pattern, by Robert Mole of Birmingham. Two downsides: the hilt has lost the nickel plating and the steel is currently dark (this could be polished to bright) and there is no scabbard. Aside from these factors, this is a really nice sword - great maker, all solid, all the shark skin and silver grip wire present, the hilt is rock solid and the blade is clean with clear etching. The blade has been better service-sharpened than I have ever seen on a 1908 or 1912 pattern before - it's been really professionally done so that there is a proper edge for most of the blade length. The pommels on this pattern often get loose, but this one is solid. Because this sword is from George V's reign and it has been so well service sharpened it is extremely likely that this was carried in WW1.

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A desirable and rare 1892 pattern patent solid hilted infantry officer's sword, by Wilkinson, numbered 32961 (for early 1895). This sword is especially rare because, aside from being the full-width tang version (patent solid hilt), it features the 1854 style hilt and 1892 blade, which were only used in combination between 1892 and 1895. This must have been one of the last one's made, before the switch was made to the 1895 pattern steel hilt. This sword is unresearched, but looks like it has been carried in service for a while and is marked VRI for an officer serving in India. The grip wire appears to have been replaced, the etching is rather faint on the blade due to cleaning, there are some areas of pitting and there is no scabbard - hence the price. However this is a highly desirable sword and may be very interesting to research, being a numbered Wilkinson.

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An infantry officer's sword, 1897 pattern, by Wilkinson. Numbered 62286 (for 1930) and with their hexagonal 'best quality' proof slug. This sword is unresearched. The blade and hilt are bright, but with some pitting - mainly to the guard. The whole assembly is solid though and with some buffing this could be brought up to a really nice standard. The grip is in excellent condition, with very good grip wire and shark skin. The scabbard is present and also in very good condition. The blade etching remains perfectly clear in most areas and a little over-buffed in other areas, which may suggest a long service life. Given the date, this might have an interesting WW2 history.

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A rare and desirable Royal Engineers sword, by Wilkinson to a named officer with interesting career, re-hilted to the 1897 pattern with an older (1872) blade. The officer this sword seems to have belonged to, from the date of the blade and initials on it (CHD) must be Charles Henry Darling, who joined the Royal Engineers in 1872. According to Hart's Army Lists he served in Afghanistan 1879-80, Egypt in 1882, was present at the Battle of Tel-el-Kebir, and also served in the Sudan Campaign of 1885, with medals for all of the above! His Wilkinson blade would originally have been mounted on the 1857 pattern brass Engineers hilt, but when the Royal Engineers switched to the new 1897 pattern hilt, Darling followed suit. The sword itself is in pretty good condition. The hilt and scabbard are nickel plated and most of the plating remains, with just small rust spots here and there, which should be dealt with. The blade is in really great condition, bright and clean, with just a few patches of pitting and clear etching. It has been well service sharpened. Royal Engineers swords are quite uncommon, Wilkinson ones are even rarer, ones with such an interesting history as this are very rare.

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An early pre-1854 (pre-numbered) Wilkinson Royal Artillery officer's sword, Crimean War era or earlier, with scabbard. This is a lovely sword, but has sadly lost around 50% of the shark skin on the grip. Despite this, most of the silver grip wire is still present, the hilt is solid on the tang (though quite pitted), the leather washer is still present and the blade is in good condition. In fact the blade is in really good condition for the age, with beautifully details etching in good crisp condition, a bright surface overall and it has been well service sharpened. The sword dates to between 1845 and 1854, so it could have been carried in any of the wars between those dates or after. The scabbard is clearly original to this sword and is a nice fit. These early pre-numbered Wilkinsons are really lovely swords and not very easy to find. A good restorer may be able to replace the missing shark skin, but the sword is fine in hand without it.

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An attractive 1827 pattern Royal Navy officer's sword from between 1827 and 1846 (when the blade type changed). This early example features the attractive pipe-back and quill-pointed blade. The blade itself is in good condition, straight and solid in the hilt, with a bright surface. It has some pitting at the tip end (see photos) and the etching is almost invisible now, as it often is with this blade type. The hilt is in good condition overall, with a slightly bent rear quillon and a bash to the backstrap, however the white shark skin grip and wire are in great condition for the age. The lion pommel is in crisp condition and somewhat unusually for this sword type, the whole hilt assembly is tight, without movement. No scabbard.

SOLD