Easton Antique Arms

www.antique-swords.co.uk

HOME FOR SALE BUYING AND POSTAGE ANTIQUE SWORD RESEARCH

Email schola-gladiatoria@hotmail.co.uk to inquire about an item for sale

Please visit and follow our Facebook page

I also buy antique swords and firearms at fair prices - email me with photos if you have something to sell

BRITISH SWORDS
A George VI era infantry officer's sword, by Wilkinson, of their best quality (hexagonal proof slug) and identified to an officer with a fascinating WW2 history. The officer was Peter James Fulton. He was born 04/04/1919 in Edinburgh and joined the 2nd Battalion of the Lancashire Fusiliers on 26/01/1939. He became an acting captain on 13/07/1940. From the outbreak of war in 1939 to 1940, the 2nd Battalion, Lancashire Fusiliers was deployed with the 11th Infantry Brigade as part of the 4th Infantry Division and was sent in October 1939 to join the British Expeditionary Force. The 2nd Battalion fought against the German Army in the battles of Belgium and France, until being forced to retreat to Dunkirk and were evacuated back to the United Kingdom, where they stayed until late 1942, anticipating a German invasion.
Account of his death in an air crash:
“Apart from the extra curricular Battle of Britain activities, Summer and early Autumn 1940 were particularly hectic for the SDF (special duties flight) at Christchurch, flying through the weekends became axiomatic and Trevor had not had one day off since mid-August. On Tuesday 17th September 1940 he was briefed to fly Blenheim P4830 to act as a target for a SDF Beaufighter experimental A.I. (airborne interception) sortie. The weather was reasonably good with almost 10/10ths alto-stratus cloud at 12,000 ft, visibility 15 miles but with a strong and blustery easterly wind blowing at 20 mph, gusting to 30 mph. He was asked if he would take two passengers along for the flight as they had a particular interest in observing the local beach defences from the air. Thus Captain Peter Fulton (21) and 2nd Lieutenant Ronald Jefferies (28) of the 2nd Battalion Lancashire Fusiliers boarded the Blenheim for the take-off at 1500 hours. The flight to the rendezvous was uneventful, albeit lumpy in the turbulence and, despite loitering for 30 minutes, the Beaufighter failed to show. About the, the starboard engine oil temperature started to rise and the oil pressure began to drop; there was no choice other than to shut the engine down, if a fire was to be avoided. Trevor could not maintain height and began a descent back towards Christchurch, eyewitnesses saw him at 1600 hours near Salisbury, in a left-hand turn at an estimated height of 150 feet, still descending and with the starboard engine windmilling.
“To land in a field chosen from height would have been made infinitely more difficult in the blustery wind conditions and it is likely that the choice of field had to be revised on more than one occasion. In the event, in the final stages of the approach to the field that he was able to attain, a house came into view that obstructed the line of flight. The port engine was opened up in an attempt to climb over the house, which was successful. But, with insufficient rudder control at low speed to counter the effect of the port engine, the starboard wing dropped. The aeroplane, turning toward the dead engine and still descending, struck high trees and crashed on the Longford Castle estate. Trevor and Captain Fulton were killed instantaneously; Lieutenant Jefferies died shortly after.

£375 + P&P NEW
A lovely Georgian 1803 pattern infantry officer's sword, by J J Runkel of Solingen. This is in overall very good condition for the age, with clear engraving to the 29 inch blade, the shagreen and grip wire in good condition and the brass elements of the hilt with some gilding remaining and in good shape. This is a relatively robust example of the type, with nice thick brass guard. There is some slight movement to the backstrap, guard and ferrule, though the grip seems to be tight on the tang, so you don't feel it much when holding. The blade is free of warps or bends and is a nice little choppy blade like a scaled-down 1796 sabre. Runkel were the primary German exporter of swords to Britain in this period.

£595 + P&P NEW
A lovely example of an 1845 pattern infantry officer's sword, retailed by Jones and made by Mole. This is a great example in top notch condition, dating to 1845-1860ish. It retains a high percentage of the original polish, showing the contrast between mirror polish and frost etching. It has during its service life been professionally sharpened, so probably saw at least one campaign. The hilt retains a lot of the original gilt coating to the brass. The shagreen and grip wire are in good condition. Everything is solid. The scabbard fits well and is sound. Even the original sword knot remains. A great example of a sword that could have been carried in the Crimean War or any of the other conflicts of the late 1840s and 1850s.

SOLD
An 1827 pattern Rifles officer's sword. This example in bright condition and everything solid. The grip shagreen is unusually lightly coloured for some reason. The guard and scabbard are pitted, but have obviously been subsequently buffed bright. The blade is also bright, but with very little pitting and the etching clear, although quite faint.

£285 + P&P - SALE PENDING
An 1853 pattern cavalry trooper's sword in good condition. Sadly lacking the scabbard, the only other real flaws to mention with this sword is a tiny bit of shrinkage to the leather grips and a notch in the blade (see photo). Otherwise this is a great example and with Indian War Department markings, so it was issued either to an Indian cavalry regiment or to a British cavalry regiment while posted in India. The unsharpened blade is bright and clean, straight and solid in the hilt (of course, being a patent solid hilt!). The guard is equally clean and in good shape - the leather washer is even in place. A good example.

SOLD
A rare Napeolonic era British infantry officer's non-regulation sabre, featuring a faux-damascus blade and ivory grip. The 27 inch highly curved shamshir-style blade of this sword is in fantastic condition, showing the etched damascus pattern, emulating wootz swords of the Middle East. It is solid in the hilt and is sharp. The guard and backstrap are brass with traces of gilding remaining in the recesses. The guard is clearly inspired by the 1796 light cavalry sabre and the backstrap is similar to the 1803 pattern infantry officer's sabre. Therefore this sword probably dates to around 1803-1810. It could be British or German made, but almost certainly for a British officer, perhaps serving in India and perhaps Honourable East India Company. The ivory grip may be a period but slightly later addition, as I  have seen a slightly similar sword to this one with a shagreen grip.

Please note that because of the ivory grip, I cannot export this sword outside the UK.

£1,250 + P&P
   

OTHER SWORDS AND WEAPONS
A superior quality Indian tulwar of the 18th or 19th century, with silver koftgari decoration to the hilt and likely wootz blade. This sword also has an original scabbard. I cannot confirm for certain that the blade is wootz as it would require etching to be sure, but I strongly suspect that it is. The hilt is beautifully preserved with a lot of the silver decoration remaining all over. The blade is secure in the hilt. The edge of the blade is stilll quite sharp.

£475 + P&P NEW
An Indian battle axe from the 18th or 19th century. This example is quite light and features a hollow steel shaft, which seems to be filled with something like wood. It has pitting overall, but is in sound condition and of unusual form, having top and rear spikes, but a moustache-shaped axe blade that resembles bullova axes.

£195 + P&P NEW
An Indian katar, or punch-dagger, from the 18th or 19th century. A nice example with reinforced armour-piercing tip and chunky detailed grip bars.

£175 + P&P NEW
A curious combination! What I can say about this is that the blade started off life as a Victorian British infantry officer's sword. But the hilt is in the French or Belgian style for light cavalry, but with added decoration to suggest an officer's sword (I think this was done later). The leather grip has fancy wire binding and everything is secure. The scabbard is very odd and has a few repairs/alterations. In short, I don't really know what to make of this sword. A home DIY project or something else? Priced accordingly.

£150 + P&P NEW
A beautiful example of a Belgian cavalry officer's sword, from the early-20th century, perhaps around WW1 or after. Featuring the 'For King and Country' motto, the etched blade is in stunning condition with all the original polish remaining like new. The scabbard has aged and shows that this is not a recent piece, but the hilt like the blade has been kept in very nice, almost perfect, condition. The brass is all bright and crisp and the grip is basically perfect, with all the wire in place. Due to the pipe-backed blade, a fairly light sword for the length.

£325 + P&P NEW
A Continental European light cavalry sabre. This sword is basically the French 1822 light cavalry pattern, but due to the lack of French markings I presume it to be from a different country. This model of sword was used in parts of Germany and elsewhere, including being the basis for U.S. cavalry swords of the period. Overall it is in nice condition, but has loss to the leather grip covering on the inside - this could be repaired. The large heavy blade is in nice condition and bright and the brass parts of the hilt are in good shape with old patina (the hilt could be buffed to bright brass easily enough).

£250 + P&P NEW
A 19th century Indian infantry officer's sword, for one of the semi-independent princely states. This sword is in overall nice condition with a bright (and sharpened) blade, clean hilt and shiny hardwood grip, with the grip wire in place. There is a little movement in the hilt on the tang and the very end of the blade has some rust damage, but this could be restored easily enough.

£250 + P&P
An Indian khanjar dagger probably dating to the early 19th century, with the remains of silver koftgari decoration. The dagger is 16” overall with an 11.5” blade with a distinctive recurve. It has been sharpened on both sides and the point is reinforced for pushing through clothing and maille. The dagger must have been expensive in its day as the blade is finely inlaid in silver with a scene of a tiger hunting a deer. On one side of the blade this is clearer than the other but both sides have foliage near the hilt and at the section where the blade thickens into the reinforced point. The hilt also has traces of inlay although this has mostly gone.

£210 + P&P
Brazilian Cavalry sword late 19th/early 20th century. The blade is in excellent condition still having most of its original polish and with only a small amount of staining near the last third. The hilt has the Brazilian coat of arms and the blade is marked AEC and Marca Registrada. Being directly attached to blade the grip is tight but the guard has a slight movement. Scabbard is also in good condition with light patina. Please note that the blade was still coated in its factory grease and some remains in the scabbard - means the blade is in excellent condition but requires a wipe every now and again.

£160 + P&P
An 18th or 19th century Indian firangi sword, featuring a large 39 inch blade. In overall average condition, the blade features some pitting and has been cleaned. The blade is solid in the hilt. The hilt surface matches the blade and is all solid and complete, with the pommel stalk remaining solid also. As a rough guide, my hand fits in this hilt quite comfortably. A good honest example of the type.

£325 + P&P
A Japanese wakizashi or large tanto with 13 inch blade. The tang is unsigned, but the blade appears to be of decent quality and I presume this weapon dates to the 19th century, though it may be older. It is in need of restoration and with professional attention would probably become a very nice piece. The tsuba and fuchi show some nice detail to the decoration. The same of the grip appears to be in good condition, though the silk tsuka ito would benefit from re-wrapping or replacement. The mekugi peg is missing, though the tsuka is quite secure on the tang just from friction. The habaki is not very good quality and is slightly split - I would replace this straight away. The scabbard is obviously original, though rather battered and missing elements. I'm sure it could be well restored easily enough though.

£350 + P&P
 

SOLD ITEMS ARCHIVE
A rare Patent Solid Hilt officer's sword, made by Pillin for Phillips & Co of London, marked to the Artillery Militia and with an officer's initials (WWS?). This sword is unresearched. What makes this sword especially rare is that it is a Patent Solid Hilt which was not made by Reeves (who owned the patent) or Wilkinson (who used the patent under licence). Pillin (as identified from the proof slug here) did make this type of full-width tang construction as a costly optional extra, but non-Wilkinson examples are very scarce and I have only seen a handful in years of collecting. Dating this sword is a little tricky, but given that it was made by Pillin (mostly active after 1862) and given the shape of the hilt, I would say it is probably from the late-1860s or 1870s. This, coupled with the officer's initials, may make it possible to find the officer through Hart's Annual Army Lists (found on Archive.org). The sword itself features a field service scabbard which seems to have seen quite a bit of use and some old repair at the drag. The blade is mostly bright with clear etching, a little rubbed in places and with some patches of black staining/pitting here and there. The guard and backstrap are lightly pitted from rust, but have been cleaned bright, still showing the engraved decoration and chequering. The composition grip slabs on the full width tang are in good condition, just with minor rubbing and a good level of chequering remaining. The grip wire is all present. The hilt and blade are solid and tight. A rare and desirable sword in fairly good condition, with research potential.

SOLD
A 1796 pattern-inspired infantry officer's sword of the Napoleonic era. This attractive sword has a 28 inch blade and so was probably made for an infantry or naval officer as a fighting sidearm. It has been service sharpened (though not currently sharp to touch) and has some little edge nicks. The hilt assembly is quite tight and the leather washer is in place. The grip leather has a couple of patches of loss, but nothing unusual for a 200 year old sword. It has an even light patina to both the blade and guard and overall is in quite nice condition.

SOLD
An 1853 pattern cavalry sword by Reeves of Birmingham, with scabbard and marked to the RWYC (something Yeomanry Cavalry). The blade of this sword has been service sharpened and is in fairly good condition, with grey patina and a little light pitting, but unfortunately the scabbard and leather grip in particular have been the victims of damp damage. The scabbard is very pitted - right through in a couple of points - and the leather grips have partly rotted away (worse on one side than the other). The guard, strangely, has not suffered so much. Being of Reeves' patent solid hilt construction everything is solid and functionally sound. This could either serve as a display being for someone who doesn't mind the condition of the grips, or a restoration project. The grips could be restored in a number of ways and if someone wants a sword to swing around then with some new grip wrapping this would serve as a functional piece, being solid in the hand.

SOLD
A Victorian infantry officer's sword in need of restoration. This sword is actually in generally quite good condition, with an Indian service leather scabbard, superficial surface rust to a fairly bright blade with the etching mostly clear. The shagreen and grip wire are in good shape and the hilt construction on the tang is secure. The big issue is that the brass guard, or rather the side extension, has cracked in three critical points which has left it wiggling on the side of the knucklebow (though the knucklebow itself is secure). Someone with experience of brazing or soldering would be able to fix this, after straightening a couple of the bars. Priced as a restoration project.

SOLD
A good example of an 1890 pattern cavalry sword, marked to the 3rd Dragoon Guards among other markings. Please note that while this is in good condition, the point has been rounded deliberately, I presume for training purposes in period. This was standard practice with out of service models when a new model came in, though this one doesn't show any accompanying edge damage from practice and some examples do. The sword is otherwise in nice condition with good finish and minimal patina for the age. Plenty of stamps. The leather grips are secure and in good condition. The blade's point could be reshaped with some work on a grinder or with a file.

SOLD
A rare cavalry sword for an officer of the Diamond Fields Horse (DFH) of South Africa, made by Pillin of London and with an extra long 36 inch blade. I have not done a lot of research on this sword, but there is surely plenty to do - I believe it dates to around 1890. The sword is in overall great condition, together with the scabbard, frog and suspension straps for connecting to a Sam Browne belt. The blade is bright and clean with fairly faint etching. The hilt is all solid on the tang. The guard is bright and clean. The shagreen and silver grip wire is in good condition. A rare sword in good condition.

SOLD
An intriguing shortened (cutlass size) 1853 pattern cavalry sword. This was obviously deliberately shortened for some specific purpose and it has been very well done. The age patina to the blade is the same all over the shortened and sharpened region, so must all be more or less contemporary. The point has been completely re-shaped and the edge has been well sharpened. It has Enfield inspection marks on the ricasso, so was an issued weapon at some point, either before or after the shortening. There is a faint remainder of a maker's name on the spine, but I cannot quite read it - perhaps Reeves. The hilt is all solid, though one side of the leather grip is more worn than the other.

SOLD
A rare and high quality Italian cavalry officer's sword Model 1833 for the Guard of Honour of the Kingdom of Two Sicilies. The blade is marked as having been made in Naples in 1849. This model of sword seems to have passed out of use when Garibaldi unified Italy in 1860. The sword is in good condition, with clear crisp etching to the blade. The blade is clean with a light blue patina, solid in the hilt. It seems to have been sharpened originally. The clipped-point remains in good shape and the blade is free of bends or twists. The brass hilt is in good overall condition and is a very characteristic design to this model of sword. The pommel nut really accentuates the quality of construction of this sword, with its faceted surface. The scabbard is present, though rather battered, with a crease near the tip which has a crack in it. This however has performed its task of protection the sword very well. A very rare and desirable sword with an interesting place in Italian history.

SOLD
A Dutch klewang cutlass from the early to mid 20th century, by Milsco. This example is missing its scabbard and generally not in great condition, so is offered as a restoration job. The wooden grips are a bit battered and a little loose, though generally speaking it is solid otherwise. The blade edge is a bit chewed up apparently from being bashed against another sword or hard object. This edge was not previously sharpened however, so sharpening the edge would remove most of this damage. It is fairly clean in general and with some work could be turned into a functional piece.

SOLD
A French M1831 'coupe-choux' (cabbage chopper) gladius-like infantry short sword. This example has a lot of pitting to the blade, hence the price. However it is all solid and the hilt is in nice condition.

SOLD
Early 1822 pattern British infantry officers sword dating to the reign of William IV (1830-37). The pipeback blade has a nice patina with some light pitting and none of the etching visible and is firm in the hilt. The hilt has a working drop down guard (designed to sit comfortably against the officers side when worn) and the William IV cypher. There are some losses to the shagreen covering the grip but all is otherwise sound. In need of some attention.

SOLD
An 1879 pattern British Victorian Royal Navy Midshipman’s dirk. The 17’’ blade is in good condition with some staining but all of the etching clear. Retailer mark to base reading ‘E W Seagrove - The Hard - Portsea'. The hilt has a tiny movement (blade firm but cross guard slightly loose) but with its shagreen and wire in excellent condition. It is missing the button that secured it in its scabbard on the reverse of the dirk and the ring that the sword knot was attached to.

SOLD
1853 pattern British cavalry troopers sword with a good condition blade. The blade is marked to the maker Harvey and retains much of its original polish. It has been service sharpened and has a few nicks and a tiny bit of damage around the point. The leather grips are firmly attached with the patent hilt solid but have been worn very smooth and are far less rounded than when new. The hilt has the markings ‘WYC 2nd T 17’ (possibly Worcester Yeomanry Cavalry) on one of the arms of the guard but no other visible stamps although there may be some under the patina.

SOLD
19th century brass hilted tulwar. The relatively narrow 29“ blade is firm in the hilt and in good condition with a light patina and only a few patches of staining. The scabbard is in good condition with a metal shoe and a leather cord which presumably helped attach the scabbard to a belt or a sash.

SOLD
A basic good quality Indian tulwar, 18th or 19th century. This tulwar does not feature any decoration, but is made to a good standard and is a nice orbust piece, in good condition for the age.

SOLD
A good honest 1885 pattern cavalry trooper's sword, in need of cleaning. This sword is fundamentally in pretty good condition, but has not been at all cleaned or restored. There are plenty of stamps and markings visible, including the manufacture date in 1886 and the maker MOLE (the best mass producer of cavalry swords at the time, other than Wilkinson). The leather grips are in decent condition and solid, the full width patent tang construction obviously means that the whole sword is still solid and strong. It has not been service sharpened. This should make a good restoration project and should clean up very well, as it seems the metal surface is all good under the dark dirt and patina.

SOLD
A truly stunning, rare and top quality late-Victorian Royal Engineers officer's sword, by top maker Pillin. This is a thick and robust sword of unusually sturdy proportions and quality, having been made as a serious fighting weapon and very evidently service sharpened. The nickel-plated hilt, shagreen and wire grip and steel blade are all in good condition and solid. The blade features an unusually complex and high-status level of etching, which would have cost extra from Pillin (who were the only real rival to Wilkinson by this date). What makes this sword even more unusual is that it has what is evidently a slightly earlier Victorian blade etched to the Royal Engineers mounted on an 1895 pattern infantry style hilt. According to Robson (Swords of the British Army) the Royal Engineers switched from the brass scroll hilt to the 1897 pattern steel hilt somewhere between 1897 and 1900 (and specifically NOT in 1895). But what we have here is an 1895 pattern steel hilt without the folded-over inner section. This leads to two possible likely conclusions - either the sword was passed from one officer (in the Royal Engineers) to another officer serving in an infantry regiment and re-hilted, or the Royal Engineers officer chose in 1895/96 to have the hilt changed for personal reasons. I lovely sword of top quality and highly unusual. If only there were some way to establish who the officer was, with its service sharpening it would surely tell a good story.

SOLD
A nice 1897 pattern infantry officer's sword, of narrow proportions, sold by Johnstone and made by Pillin. This sword is perhaps of 'piquet' weight, but in fact it is prooved for combat and made by top maker Pillin. The hilt is of normal proportions and the blade is full length, so it is essentially a lighter and more nimble version of the normal 1897 pattern. This sword dates to 1897-1901, so Boer War era. The etching of the blade is good and there is a pleasing even patina to the whole sword, blade, guard and scabbard. The shagreen has some areas of loss and most of the grip wire has come away. Everything is tight and solid.

SOLD
A Victorian infantry officer or NCO's sword. This sword is in need of some attention but is basically sound. The blade seems to be plain, which may indicate a sword for a sergeant, but I cannot see any War Department or regimental markings, so it may simple be a plain-bladed officer's sword. Everything is reasonably firm, the guard and backstrap are in decent shape. The grip has lost a lot of the shagreen, but is structurally sound. Perhaps a project for someone.

SOLD
An 1845 pattern infantry officer's sword, in need of restoration. This sword, dating to 1845-1860ish is in a rather sorry state as the photos will show. The blade has patches of rust (though other parts are quite clean, with a lot of etching remaining). The hilt is a bit loose, the guard is a bit bent about. The grip is surprisingly good really and the folding section works fine. Priced as a restoration project.

SOLD
A Victorian Highland officer's basket-hilted 'claymore', sold by Gardiner of Glasgow and made by Pillin of London. This example probably dates to the 1870s or early 1880s and features a forged basket hilt, plated blade of normal proportions and a steel scabbard. The blade is in very nice condition with clear etching and just a few little bits of loss to the nickel plating. The guard and scabbard have light pitting and matching patina, but are solid and sound, in good shape. The liner is in very good condition for the age and the grip shagreen and wire are also good. This is the type with a peened tang rather than the screw nut (indicating it's probably from before the mid-1880s). Pillin were a top maker of the day and a rival of Wilkinson. This is a really nice example of a very sought after model of sword. There were not many Highland officers at any one time, so these swords do not come around very often. It has not been service sharpened and everything is tight with the tiniest movement in the grip only.

SOLD
A Victorian 1822 pattern infantry officer's sword, with a brass scabbard for a Field Officer. This sword must date to 1837-1845 and it has been service sharpened during an interesting period of military history. The brass scabbard indicates someone of Major or higher rank. The blade is in very nice condition with the etching faint but visible, the edge still quite sharp and the point good. The hilt is overall in reasonable condition, but sadly the shagreen grip covering is almost entirely lost, though the grip wire is still in place and everything is quite tight.

SOLD
A stunning 1796 pattern infantry officer's spadroon with blue and gilt blade, by Sharpe and Mayo. This sword is a superb example of the sort of sword carried by wealthly infantry officers during the Napoleonic era and until 1822. The blue and gilding of the blade is in good overall condition and is a fantastic survival - so many of these perish. The blade is straight and solid in the hilt and appears probably to have been service sharpened above the blued area. There is some patina of course and a few corrosion spots, but basically the blade is in very good condition. The hilt features an amazing degree of survival of the original gilding all over the shell guard, knucklebow and pommel, and the silver sheet wire-impression grip is also in splendid condition. The guard hinge was damaged originally and I have had this professionally restored such that you would not now be able to tell. The hinged section now works perfectly. The shell guard has a bit of movement, but the rest of the hilt is tight. A wonderful sword.

SOLD
A rare type of Indian cavalry sword made by Wilkinson. This style of hilt is found on slightly differing blades, some larger or smaller, straighter or more curved. This example is shorter and more curved. The style of hilt is fairly rare and I have only seen around 10 examples in my years of collecting. This example is not in the best condition, having a very black patina to the steel all over and areas of pitting. However the sword is solid, the blade functional and service sharpened, tight in the hilt. The guard is all solid and features the same dark patina and light pitting. The walnut grip is in very good condition, with crisp chequering and is tight on the tang. A rare sword from British India - probably dating to around 1880-1900 and made in London by one of the best sword makers in the World.

SOLD
A stunning example of an 1857 pattern Engineers Volunteers officer's sword, retailed by quality outfitter Hebbert & Co. The 1857 pattern has to be one of the most beautiful Victorian sword patterns - granted to the Royal Engineers in 1857 (replacing the 1845 pattern infantry officer's sword for Engineers officers) in recognition of their elite status in the military structure. The hilt was modelled after that of the Scinde Irregular Cavalry and was described by John Latham of Wilkinson as the best regulation guard design. This example is for a Volunteers officer rather than regular Army and is in superb condition. The blade is basically perfect - like new. The hilt is also virtually perfect for the age, with 95% of the gilt remaining on the surface of the brass - very unusual to see as it rubs off comparatively easily. The only place the gilt has worn off here is where the heel of the officer's hand would have rested on the backstrap, showing it saw a period of use. Even the original sword knot remains in place and is in great condition! There are some rust spots on the otherwise good condition scabbard, but these could be buffed off easily enough. A basically perfect example of the pattern.

SOLD
A gorgeous example of a mid-Victorian Rifles officer's sword, with the original blade frost etching and mirror polish in superb condition. This sword was probably made in around 1860 for a Rifle Volunteers officer and is of very good quality, I believe probably by Reeves of Birmingham (due to the etching style, motifs and quality). It is not at all a rare model of sword, but it is top quality and in rare condition - the blade is practically like new. It could benefit further from a careful clean. The hilt is in equally splendid condition, with the original blueing surviving to the guard and backstrap - there are a very little patches of dirt and a few tiny rust spots, so again it would benefit from cleaning. The grip has all the shagreen and grip wire 100%. A fantastic example of the pattern.

SOLD
An interesting and attractive Victorian artillery officer's sword, for Indian service. This sword has the look of an earlier (1850s-70s) sword, but due to the suppliers' names on the blade I believe it must date to the 1880s or 1890s, when it was imported into India for sale to an officer there. This also matches the style of scabbard, which is typical of Indian service with no metal throat to the top. Stedman, Crowther & Co were a trading company established in 1881 and operating from London. Omer Jamal Vuyani was a trader of some kind operating from Bombay in the 1890s and perhaps earlier. The proof slug is the generic fleur de lis and so does not indicate the maker, but from the etching style I think the blade may be Solingen made. The sword overall is in very nice condition although with fairly dark patina all over. The etching is very crisp and clear, the blade tight in the hilt, the shagreen and grip wire all good. The scabbard is also in nice condition. An interesting piece with unquestionable association to Indian service.

SOLD
A WW1 dated Wilkinson Royal Artillery officer's sword, of 'best quality', numbered but unresearched. The hexagonal proof slug shows that this was one of Wilkinson's 'best quality' versions and it is a slightly larger and heavier version than the standard artillery officer's sword, with a broad beefy ricasso. It has been service sharpened, as many WW1 swords were. It is in clean bright condition overall. The blade is in nice condition although some of the etching is rather faint due to polishing (probably during its service life) and the service sharpening. The blade is solid in the hilt and the hilt is in good condition, with 95% of the shagreen grip covering, although it has lost most of the grip wire. The guard is bright and in great shape.

SOLD
A scarce 1882 pattern Houshold Cavalry trooper's sword in relic condition. Straight away it is apparent that this poor sword has been very neglected and has been allowed to be so attacked by water that it is now pitted all over and the shagreen gone. Despite this, the sword is structurally sound, if not pretty! It is also a rare model, being only used by the elite Household Cavalry between 1882 and 1892. The impressively massive 38.5 inch blade is solid and sound, despite the pitting, and solid in the hilt. The grip wire is loose because of the loss of the shagreen, but the hilt is otherwise solid. This sword is a rare piece and priced according to the condition - these are actually really hard to find models of sword and this is the first that has been through my hands.

SOLD
A late-Victorian light cavalry officer's sword, dated to 1889 and unresearched. A top quality sword, but not in great condition. The blade and guard have some pitting, as well as a dark overall patina. There is loss to both the shagreen and wire of the grip. However the sword is structurally sound and everything is solid, plus of course it is a Wilkinson. No scabbard and priced according to condition, but this could be cleaned up somewhat and is a top quality sword.

SOLD
A rare Wilkinson patent solid hilt Royal Artillery officer's sword and scabbard, numbered 36984 and made for Lionel Leonard Hoare. The sword was sold to Hoare (later Lieutenant-Colonel) in October 1899 (a copy of the Wilkinson ledger is included in the sale). Apart from some very minimal patina in the middle of the blade (pictured), the sword is in almost perfect condition with crisp clear etching. The hilt is in good condition, of course solid on the full width tang, with some sign of previous rust patina. The patent grips are finely chequered and in good condition, all the silver grip wire still being present. The steal scabbard is intact with some aging. A truly wonderful sword of top quality. These do not come up for sale often now and are getting harder to find.

SOLD
A desirable Napoleonic era 1796 pattern light cavalry troopers' sabre and scabbard. This is a good example of the model, with a clean bright blade which has been service sharpened. The leather washer is intact, as is 90% of the leather covering to the grip. The guard and backstrap are in good bright condition, with only a little movement on the tang in the guard (the grip being secure). The scabbard is a little battered, as you'd expect of a 200 year old cavalry weapon, with the top throat now missing. There are a few markings to the blade (see photos) but I cannot discern the maker. Samual Harvey perhaps. A very much sought after model of sword, iconic and getting more difficult to procure.

SOLD
A Victorian 1845 pattern infantry officer's sword. This is a good quality example, but sadly most of the etching to the blade is obscured, so we cannot tell the maker or retailer. There is very light pitting and patina overall, with some areas of etching still visible. The blade is structurally sound and solid in the hilt. The hilt is in good condition, with all the shagreen and grip wire present. No scabbard.

SOLD
A Dutch klewang cutlass, by Milsco, with scabbard. These were used right the way through WW2 and are usually found without their scabbards. This example is in average condition. The scabbard is a bit degraded with the end fitting missing. The blade is sound, but with a few nicks to the unsharpened edge (these would disappear if the blade was sharpened). The hilt is in reasonable condition with everything present.

SOLD
A Prussian 1889 pattern infantry officer's degen (spadroon), by WKC of Solingen. This sword probably dates to WW1 or just before and has been service sharpened, so I expect it was carried during the Great War and perhaps ended up in the UK as a trophy. It is in overall lovely condition, with the blade being bright and clean, with light patina. The hilt is all in good shape, with the brass, shagreen and wire as it should be. The leather washer under the guard seems to be a replacement, but this could be replaced as the end cap on the pommel is a screw nut and the hilt can be disassembled. Everything is tight as it is and this is a lively and nimble sword in the hand, a perfect poker! Missing its scabbard unfortunately.

SOLD
A refurbished 1897 pattern infantry officer's sword by Wilkinson, named to a significant officer. The first thing to point out about this great sword is that it has been refurbished and bizarrely it has ended up with a Victorian guard, despite the blade being later. Born in 1899, Major Perry (99471) served as an enlisted soldier in France and Belgium during the Great War, receiving the British War and Victory Medals. He remained in the Army and rose to the rank of Regimental Sergeant Major in the King’s Shropshire Light Infantry. In 1939 he was promoted to Lieutenant (Quartermaster) of the KSLI and received an MBE from King George VI in 1942 for services to the Army. By 1948 he was a Major and he retired at that rank in October of 1952. The Wilkinson record shows that this sword (or at least the blade) was bought for Perry by a fellow officer. The sword is obviously in very good parade condition and could easily be re-employed by a current serving infantry officer. The blade features Wilkinson's hexagonal 'best quality' proof slug. The grip wire is mostly missing, but this should be easy to replace.

SOLD
A really top quality French NCO's spadroon, made in Klingenthal and dated 1828. This is a lovely sword in the hand - everything is tight and it is a large solid piece with a very stiff blade. The double-edged blade is in lovely condition with light grey patina and clear engraving. The hilt is in basically perfect condition for the age, with light patina to the brass and the grip wire is fantastic. The slightly rectangular wire grip feels very good in the hand and the sword has a lovely balance. Quite a rare piece in this sort of early and robust arrangement - most are later and more flimsy.

SOLD
A French 1845/55 pattern infantry officer's sword, dated to 1870 and professionally shortened. It is anyone's guess as to why this blade was shortened, but the re-shaping of the tip has been professionally done, the blade sharpened and the patina of the point is the same as the rest of the blade. My conclusion therefore is that this shortening and re-shaping was done in period, perhaps during the Franco-Prussian War of 1870, or perhaps later. Perhaps it was used in WW1, we'll never know! Everything is solid and it handles exactly like a cutlass should. A nice little sword and relatively cheap for what it is.

SOLD
A knife from Bhutan or Tibet, 19th or early-20th century. This lovely knife is obviously fairly high status given the amount of metal and decoration. The entire scabbard and most of the hilt are covered in some sort of alloy which has ben decorated all over with reflief work. The blade is nice quality, in good condition and solid in the hilt. The wooden liner of the scabbard is all present and shows notable age. A very nice solid piece of good size.

SOLD
A good quality basic kukri, probably from around WW1. No scabbard.

SOLD
A Prussian 1889 pattern cavalry troopers' sword by Alex Coppel of Solingen. This sword is in really nice condition, despite lacking the scabbard and has two sets of stamps which seem to date it to 1891 and attribute it to a Hussars regiment. The blade is in almost perfect condition, solid in the hilt. The guard and pommel are almost perfect, with very minimal patina, and the bakerlite grip is also in almost perfect condition, all tight on the tang. The leather washer is in place and the blade is straight, with its attractive pipe-back blade and quill point.

SOLD
An 1853 pattern cavalry trooper's sword by Mole of Birmingham. This example has a beefier guard than some and it is all solid and complete, except for missing the scabbard. The blade is in sound condition with a bit of light pitting here and there, but the MOLE stamp on the spine is visible. The leather grips are a little skrunk and eroded, but quite secure on the rivets. This pattern of sword was introduced just in time for the Charge of the Light Brigade and served throughout various campaigns of the 1850s and through to the 1870s. It was the first model to feature Charles Reeves' patent solid hilt, which you can read more about on the Research page linked above.

SOLD
An unusual and good quality Rifles officer's sword. This example is unusual by virtue of having an extra-long blade, at 34.5 inches it is two inches longer than standard. The quality of manufacture is also good and presumably this was contracted for Hills, the outfitter, by someone a good quality maker. I cannot tell the maker from the proof slug unfortunately. Overall the sword is in good condition, but in need of cleaning and attention. The scabbard leather needs feeding and the guard and backstrap could be cleaned up more. The blade is in good condition, with crisp etching and bright surface. It is straight and solid in the hilt. The shagreen is good and the wire is present though with a couple of loose strands. A really nice sword that would regard further cleaning and a bit unusual. Lovely in the hand - a proper fighting sword probably of the 1880s.

SOLD
An artillery officer's sword. the blade is great condition, with bright and clear etching, and solid in the hilt. The scabbard rather pitted and with a notable crease - the sword still sheathes fine. The hilt in okay condition, with all the shagreen and a bit of loss to a couple of the wire strands. The guard and backstrap rather pitted.

SOLD
A good Victorian West Kent Yeomanry officer's sword, with initials to the blade, by Pillin. Retailed by quality outfitter Hobson & Sons of London, the proof slug identifies this sword as the work of top maker Pillin. Probably dating to around the 1870s, it is a good clean example of the post-1845 1821 pattern light cavalry officer's sword. The blade is bright, with clear etching. The hilt is in overall good condition, with the shagreen and grip wire being very good. The scabbard is somewhat pitted and has obviously lost the throat a long time ago and the top of the scabbard has been professionally curled over to compensate for the loss of the brass throat. The initials on the blade may well enable a researcher to match this sword to an officer in the West Kent Yeomanry (from Hart's Army Lists).

SOLD
Victorian Kent Artillery Volunteers officer's sword. This sword is in good condition, with a bright blade, clear etching, firm in the hilt. The hilt is in clean condition, with even patina to the guard, backstrap and scabbard. The shagreen and grip wire is in good condition. Overall, a very tidy sword and nice that it is marked to a specific volunteer battalion.

SOLD
A nice quality private purchase kukri with double fullers. Possible around 1930s-1960s. This kukri is in nice overall condition, with a bright blade and horn hilt. The brass ferule is in good shape and there is only a little deformation to the brass pommel cap. Lacks scabbard.

SOLD
An 1895 pattern infantry officer's sword, by top maker Pillin (retailed by J.B.Johnstone of Dublin & London). The 1895 pattern guard was only being made for two years, but by definition it was supposed to be steel. This example however is brass, though the chequered backstrap is steel. It seems ironic to make a backstrap of steel but a hand guard of brass! This is however a sword which is of piquet weight, though there again lies a contradiction, because this blade was made by Pillin (a top maker and rival of Wilkinson) and has been proved (for use). It is also housed in a wood and leather field service scabbard rather than a steel parade scabbard. So whether we call this a piquet weight sword or not, it seems to have been built to be used. A very attractive sword, of full length but slender proportions, almost like a duelling version of a standard 1895 pattern sword. The blade is in lovely condition, with detailed etching and everything clear. It is all solid and tight. The guard and grip are also in lovely condition. The leather of the scabbard has perished slightly, but at least the custom narrow scabbard is still present. A very nice and perhaps unique sword that is a pleasure in the hand.

SOLD
A good quality West York Artillery Volunteers officer's sword, made by top maker Pillin and retailed by Hobson. This is a good quality sword and features the officer's initials, so it may be possible to pin it down to an individual officer. In overall nice condition, the blade is bright with original polish remaining - just a few small patches of minimal pitting. The etching is crisp and clear, the hilt is solid on the tang. The guard features original browning and the shagreen and wire are in great condition. A very nice sword, with lots of data to research.

SOLD
A military kukri from WW1-1930s date, with the regulation scabbard and accompanying karda and chakmak. The blade is in good condition and solid in the hilt, the pommel cap and pommel have a little damage which probably occurred during service. A nice example and well kept.

SOLD
A rare kind of kukri with enclosed cho, with its scabbard, chakmak and karda. This kukri is need of some attention and is priced accordingly. The blade is sound, but need cleaning and the hilt needs re-fitting to the tang. This would be a worthwhile project however, as it is fundamentally a good quality piece. The pommel plate has at some time since original manufacture had an aluminium washer plate inserted at the tang end. I presume this kukri to be around WW2 date, but has been tampered with after manufacture. Properly restored this would easily be worth twice as much.

SOLD
An Austrian Model 1904 cavalry trooper's sabre. This example lacks a scabbard and the light 29 inch blade has been extensively service sharpened, presumably for WW1. The blade is nickel plated and bears the maker's mark of Weyersberg of Solingen. It has the characteristic fuller on one side and flat surface on the other side. This is a very light and lively blade.The hilt is all solid and secure, the guard and backstrap are nickel plated and in good condition and the shagreen grip and grip wire are in an equally good state.

SOLD
A good 1821 pattern pipe-backed light cavalry officer's sword. This is a nice tidy example of the type, with the characteristic and pretty pipe-backed blade in full cavalry size, featuring the quill-point. The blade is in nice condition, with the etching a little faint (as they often are with this type). The hilt is in equally tidy condition, with nice browning to the guard, matching the scabbard. The shagreen and grip wire is all present. Please ignore the rain drops in these photos - the sword was dried and oiled after the photos! A nice example of the pattern.

SOLD
A Victorian artillery officer's sword with unusual etching. This sword is in nice condition and the blade features an unusual 'stand of arms' motif, perhaps indicating German manufacture rather than British. The blade is bright and etching clear, solid in the hilt. The guard and scabbard are fairly bright also, with minimal patina for the age. the shagreen and grip wire is all good. A tidy sword.

SOLD
A scarce early 1897 pattern Royal Engineers officer's sword. This sword dates to around WW1 and being an 1897 pattern Royal Engineers sword of this era makes it quite a rare piece. The blade is sound, but with quite grey patina and although most of the etching is visible, it is quite faded. The winged lightning bolts emblem of the Royal Engineers is visible though, as is the intricate interlaced decoration. The guard is in good condition, with some minor pitting but basically clean. The shagreen is good except for one patch missing and the grip wire has gone. The nickel-plated scabbard in good condition. Priced according to condition, but this sword is rather rare for the WW1 period.

SOLD
A very interesting late-Victorian infantry officer's sword. At first sight this seems like an 1895 pattern piquet weight sword, but it isn't. The blade is fully prooved and carries quality maker Thurkle's proof slug - therefore it is made for use. The blade is the earlier 1845 type, but narrower than standard, and the officer obviously valued the blade enough to have it re-hilted in 1895 when the new regulations came in, but elected not to convert to the new 1892 pattern thrusting blade. The blade therefore dates to before 1892 and was re-hilted in 1895 or 1896, so whoever owned this sword served for at least a few years in the British Army. The hilt is full size and good quality. The steel scabbard is obviously made especially for this blade. The blade is bright, but the etching is quite faded - you can still see Victoria's cypher and other markings though. The hilt is in good condition, with a nice patina to the guard and backstrap, and the shagreen and wire of the grip is in very good condition. A lovely light sword from the end of the Victorian era and rather unusual.

SOLD
A 19th century tulwar-hilted sword, with an interesting 26” long straight blade. The blade is of backsword style just over 1” in width and forms a 26” long relatively stiff fighting sword. It is in good condition with very little pitting and minor staining but with a very slight set at the end of the blade. The grip is in good condition and of good quality as it is decorated on the top of the disc hilt, at the end of the knuckle bow and at the base of the hilt with tiny finials (one side has broken off). The grip is canted slightly giving a good angle for cutting. Everything is firm with no movement. It comes with a modern wooden scabbard with a red velvet covering.

SOLD
Very rare Army Hospital Corps private's sword - called the "rarest of all regulation patterns" by Robson in Swords of the British Army. In fact I think Robson was over-egging the rarity, or maybe just hadn't seen many himself, but I have seen a few of these. Nevertheless, they are very rare. This example is not in perfect condition at all - it has a slightly bent outer guard, which has a small (stable) crack in it, the blade has been used either for sword drill or actual fighting, and so has a few small notches (see photos) and there is no scabbard. Despite this, the hilt is solid on the tang and otherwise it is in fairly good shape. The cast iron grip is solid and tight and the leather washer is even intact. A scarce opportunity to grab one of these pretty rare swords.

SOLD
An 1885 pattern cavalry trooper’s sword with a lot of stamps and markings. The sword was first issued in 1888 and again 1889, 1890 and 1892. At some point it was issued to the yeomanry cavalry and it has the YC stamped on the base of the blade and a Y and WK on the scabbard (possibly Warwickshire Yeomanry). There are various Enfield and Birmingham inspection marks, the bend test cross and an S and a C on the tang. It may be possible to see which regular cavalry unit it was originally issued to with some light cleaning on the lip of the hilt but it is not immediately apparent. The blade is in excellent condition retaining a high polish. The hilt is sound but has the remnants of some plating on it. The scabbard is sound but with a deep patina and some areas of lifted plating. A good example of a sword that had a relatively short service life (in theory the 1885 was superseded by 1890 pattern, although many would have continued in service and later been issued to the yeomanry cavalry) but in this case has had an active service life.

SOLD
A top quality Wilkinson 1897 pattern British infantry officers sword (still current regulation for infantry officers) with a hexagonal proof disc denoting Wilkinson's best quality. The sword is dated to 1933 and has George V cypher on the hilt and blade. The blade itself is in good condition with some light staining and a few marks but no pitting and some lovely crisp etching. The panel in which a coat of arms or name may be added is blank but the stamped serial number, 63754, may allow the sword to be researched. The spine of the blade also has the ‘made in England’ stamp. The grip is also in good condition with all its shagreen and wire present. The hilt has a few rough patches in the plating but is overall in good condition and it retains its leather sword knot. The leather covered wooden scabbard is sound.

SOLD
A very unusual mid-Victorian Rifles officer's sword by Wilkinson, of piquet weight and proportions, with patriotic slogans to the blade. The blade number is un-researched. This sword is numbered (16006 for 1868), which is somewhat unusual for a piquet weight sword and suggests that the blade was proved. The blade is in fact nice and springy, so it has been tempered in the same manner as other Wilkinson blades. The blade is devoid of the normal etching (except the Wilkinson maker's etching), but instead has on one side the French "Prest Pour Mon Pais" (Ready For My Country) and on the other side the Latin "Deo Duce Ferro Comitante" (God as my Leader, my Sword as my Companion). This is very intriguing, but what does it all amount to? I suspect that this was made for a particularly patriotic member of the Rifle Volunteers movement (which was in full swing in the 1860s), but it certainly warrants further research and I have never seen another one like it. The sword is in good general condition - the guard and scabbard have been subjected to some light rust, but this has been mostly stablised and cleaned. Further cleaning would benefit the sword. The shagreen grip and wire is in good condition and all present. The blade is solid in the hilt and is in bright clean condition for the most part, having a few areas of rust damage which should clean up well (and more easily being a mostly un-etched blade). A very interesting piece, top quality and worthy of some more research. Would happily fit alongside other top quality swords in any collection.

SOLD
A pair of British Victoran private-purchase cutlasses. I own a similar cutlass to these, but that is marked to Wilkinson. My research suggested that it may have been made by Wilkinson for sale to a private customer seeking to arm a private yacht or merchant vessel. Sailing in those days was rather more dangerous than now! I suspect that these are a similar case, intended to arm a yacht or trade vessel. There is no maker's mark on either, but they are good quality and in excellent condition. Neither has been sharpened and it is clear that they were made as part of the same contract. The 24 inch blades are in original polish, with only some blemishes. The guards move a little, but the grips are tight on the tangs. The brass guards and backstraps are in very nice condition and the leather and brass wire grips are also very good. There is a little wear to some of the leather grips, but generally they are very good for the age. The scabbards are both present, but both of them have lost the stitching on the inside seams and one has lost the bottom brass end. They sheath well nevertheless. A fine pair of cutlasses - I'm willing to sell them separately or as a pair.

BOTH SOLD
SOLD ARCHIVE 4
SOLD ARCHIVE 3
SOLD ARCHIVE 2
SOLD ARCHIVE 1