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SOLD ITEMS ARCHIVE
EL6096 - A Boer-War era Victorian 1897 pattern infantry officer's sword by Wilkinson, made in the year 1900 and unresearched. This is a good tidy sword that needs some work on the guard and backstrap, where the nickel plating has been covered with something that looks like old varnish. The blade is bright and with clear etching. The blade is firm in the hilt. The grip shagreen and wire are good and the scabbard is present (although the end is damaged and a bit tatty). Some light restoration should really bring this sword up to standard and it's a top quality infantry officer's sword from the second to last year of Queen Victoria's reign. It has not been service sharpened and restored to the right level it could be used by a serving infantry officer today.

SOLD
EL6073 - A mid-Victorian naval cutlass with less common straight double-edged blade. There is a visible proof/approval stamp on the ricasso, but the precise date and model of this type of cutlass is unclear. The hilt is the 1845 pattern, but that pattern usually has a 29 inch single-edged and slightly curved blade. This 29 inch blade is straight and double-edged. Solid in the hilt and will no movement - the blade has been service sharpened but then probably used for training, as it has a series of small edge nicks. An unusual and hefty piece.

SOLD
EL6095 - A lovely example of the Italian M1888 mounted artillery sabre. It has a bright blade (some staining near the tip on one side, which would polish out), solid in the hilt. The guard, backstrap and wooden grip are all in good condition, as is the steel scabbard. The leather washer is in place. With its revolutionary hilt design stemming back to the M1871, these were important steps in the evolution of European military swords in the last decades of the 19th century. Very robustly constructed and with regimental markings.

SOLD
EL6078 -  A mystery spadroon. At first sight I thought this was a 1796 pattern heavy cavalry dress sword, but it isn't, although it has some similarities. The blade engraving style looks continental, perhaps French, Dutch or Belgian. Therefore the case is open on this one. The condition overall is quite good, with a bright clean blade, with a few patches of light surface rust to remove. The hilt is loose on the tang and needs attention, and whatever grip covering there once was has long since disappeared. This should be a relatively easy restoration, or the sword is pretty presentable left as it is if you don't mind a loose hilt.

SOLD
ELC1008 - The Victorian Highland Light Infantry sword (with field service cross hilt) for Ernest Montagu Leith (1888-1971), winner of the Military Cross during WW1. Captain Leith served with the 1/5 City of Glasgow Battalion (Territorial Force) of the Highland Light Infantry, commissioning as 2nd Lieutenant in 1912 and reaching Captain by 1917 (back-dated to 1916). He served through WW1, including at Gallipoli, was Mentioned in Despatches by Field Marshal Sir Douglas Haig (London Gazette 20 May 1918) and was made a Chevalier of the Order of the Crown of Roumania (Romania) and Chevalier of the Military Order of Avis (Portugal). His Military Cross citation, as featured in the London Gazette of 14 March 1916 reads:
"Lieutenant Ernest Montagu Leith, 1/5th (City of Glasgow) Battalion, The Highland Light Infantry, Territorial Force. For conspicuous gallantry when commanding grenade parties in an attack. All the officers and several men were wounded, but he at once established and held a barricade, reorganised his party behind it, and, at a critical moment, assured the success of the attack".
The sale of the sword includes a small document of research and the book 'The Fifth Battalion Highland Light Infantry in the War 1914-1918', in which Leith features several times.
The sword has a 32 inch double-edged blade and has the field service cruciform hilt fitted, with the extended langets particular to the Highland Light Infantry pattern. The blade is bright and etching clean, with thistles and the VR cypher showing that it dates to pre-1901. This means that Leith presumably got this sword second-hand, perhaps handed down from a family member or fellow officer, but we know it was Leith's because he wrote his name on the scabbard strap (pictured). The sword also comes complete with a transit/storage bag, which has a weather-proofed outer skin and is lined with chamois. The hilt of the sword is in good condition, with good shagreen and all the grip wire. There is a little movement of the grip on the tang, but this could be remedied by tightening the pommel.

SOLD

 
ELC1007 - A superb Edwardian Cameron Highlanders officer's sword, with cross-hilt, to a named officer who served in the Sudan, Second Anglo-Boer War and WW1. The officer was James Brander-Dunbar, as Laird of Pitgaveny pictured later in life below, with his brother (1875-1969). As well as being a soldier, Brander-Dunbar was also famous as a hunter, traveller and sportsman. Included in the sale is the book 'John Macnab' pictured below, for whom Brander-Dunbar's hunting exploits in Scotland served as the inspiration. The sword features a 33 1/4 inch blade, etched to an Edinburgh retailer and carrying top maker Pillin's proof slug. It is etched with the Cameron Highlanders name, battle honour of 'Egypt' and Brander-Dunbar's initials in a cartouche. The blade is bright and the etching clear, the last few inches of the blade having been service sharpened (for WW1 presumably). The sword features the removable cross hilt, as worn on active service at the time (the pommel can be unscrewed, to fit a full basket hilt if desired). Complete with field service scabbard and Sam Browne frog in good condition. An excellent sword with a huge amount of research potential.

SOLD


EL6087 - A lovely 1796 pattern light cavalry officer's sword. No maker's mark visible, but this is a good quality straight forward undecorated officer's fighting sword of the Napoleonic era. The backstrap and pommel are fluted, with matching similar facets on the ferrule. Shagreen and silver wire grip in good condition. The blade is bright and in very good condition for the age, firm in the handle, although there is a little movement in the guard and the ferrule, where the leather washer has contracted with age. Together with its scabbard, which has been painted black. This is a very sweet handling sword, with a fine and narrow grip and it feels light in the foible and very lively. A good combat sword and with a little further cleaning could be improved.

SOLD
EEL6092a - French Model 1822 heavy cavalry sabre 'bancal', with huge 38 inch blade. A truly impressive sword and aside from the patina, in rather good condition. The blade is mostly smooth, but simply dark from oxidisation. The brass/bronze hilt also has a dark patina overall and both these things could be polished up if desired. The leather and wire grip is in good condition and the whole hilt is firm and tight. I cannot see any date or factory inscription on the spine of the blade, but there is an approval stamp ('W') on one side of the ricasso. This is a really fun sword to swing around due to its massive size and is very well balanced and surprisingly nimble for the length. No scabbard.

SOLD
EL6088 - A mid-19th century German cavalry officer's sword by maker Peter Daniel Luneschloss (marked PDL to the ricasso). Made for one of the pre-unification German states, this sword has a bright blade in good condition (with a little bit of a bend near the tip). The guard is of bronze, with a leather-covered wooden grip (some movement in the hilt).

SOLD
EL6079 - An 1845 pattern British infantry officer's sword retailed by Cater of Pall Mall (with a proof slug that shows it was made by Thurkle). This is narrower than the normal regulation, but I don't think I'd quite describe it as dress/piquet weight (it is just under 1 inch wide at the ricasso). The hilt, both the guard and the grip, are loose on the tang. The blade has patchy patina and some edge nicks. Overall in not bad condition, but as-found and could do with a careful clean up. No scabbard.

SOLD
EL6075 - A good quality Napoleonic era British infantry flank officer's fighting sabre, missing its grip! The blade and 1796 cavalry-inspired hilt fittings of this are nice, with its distinctly curved 'scimitar' blade which was a popular style amongst British officers circa. 1796-1805. The grip obviously entirely fell off the tang at some point, but this would make a fun project for someone and the blade seems decent quality with a good edge. The blade measures 26 inches in a straight line from tip to hilt, but has a roughly 29 inch cutting edge due to the extreme curve.

SOLD
EL6086 - A mid-Victorian 1827 pattern Rifles officer's sword, sold by Gardiner and made by Pillin. Bright blade in very good condition, with crisp etching, firm in the hilt. Steel hilt with nice patina, shagreen and grip wire very good, everything tight. Leather washer still in situ. Leather scabbard with steel fittings.

SOLD
EL6085 - A late-Victorian 1845 pattern infantry officer's sword, with Pillin's proof slug, in very good condition.  Lots of gilt remaining to the hilt and the shagreen and grip wire are practically perfect. The blade is bright with only a few stains to the steel and the etching, while a little faint in parts, is generally clear. The blade is firm in the hilt, the hilt being very tight, and the sword is complete with its scabbard, also in good condition. The leather washer seems to be a modern replacement, but does finish off what can only be described as a very good condition Victorian infantry officer's sword.

SOLD
EL6084 - A 1796 pattern light cavalry sabre. Probably for an officer, although possibly a private contract order for troopers. No maker's mark that I can see. The blade is nice and clean on this example, as are the guard and backstrap, with good preservation of the leather and cord on the wooden grip. However, during the sword's working life the ferrule has either broken or been removed and has been replaced with a wrap of bronze wire to hold the backstrap top in place. There is also a chip from the bottom of the wood and leather grip, exposing the junction between the knucklebow and the pommel cap. There is some movement in the hilt. However, the blade is lovely and despite the movement in the guard this sword feels great in the hand. No scabbard.

SOLD
EL6083 - A mid-Victorian King's Dragoon Guards (KDG) court or dress sword. A rare and unusual type of sword, this is etched to retailer Hamburger, Rogers & Co, who were the principle suppliers to officers of Horse Guards. The gilt metal crossguard features the KDG emblem in the centre of each side and the grip of ivory is carved with a design probably inspired by Indian and Islamic art. The lion-headed pommel is also formed of gilt metal, but unfortunately is rather loose on the end of the tang (though the rest of the hilt is secure). The blade remains in high polish, with one small patch of rust near the tip. The matching steel scabbard also has light rust that needed cleaning. A very scarce sword, which could be improved with some basic restoration.

Due to the ivory grip, I can only sell this sword within the UK.

SOLD
ELC1003 - A rare 1816 pattern rifleman's sawback sword, or hanger, by Osborn & Gunby. Sometimes erroneously referred to as the 1830 pattern, this is now strongly suspected to be the 1816 pattern for riflemen. This example is marked to Osborn & Gunby, who were in business together between 1808-1820 (so the sword probably dates to c.1816-1820). This is the type of pioneer's sawback hanger that preceeded the much more common model of 1856. This example is in superb condition, with a bright 22 inch blade and crisp saw edge. Everything is solid and tight, the original tang peen at the end of the hilt retaining its original engraved lines so that it matches the mane hair of the lion pommel. The brass hilt in good shape and the detailing on the lion-headed pommel still defined. A rare sword in good condition, which feels great in the hand, with a lot of authority in the swing.

SOLD
EL6092 - French Model 1821 infantry officer's sword, with 29 inch blade, gilt brass and pommel cap, and leather covered wooden grip. The blade of this example is dark with patina and has areas of light pitting (though the blade is not bad and should clean up quite well). On the spine of the blade is the manufacture location and the date 1827, so it is a fairly early example. The gilt brass hilt has some heavy patina/oxidisation, which I have left, but you can see that if cleaned off there is quite a bit of gilt remaining underneath. There is a very little bit of movement in the guard and a tiny bit of movement in the grip, which could probably be remedied with a little tightening of the peen. No scabbard.

SOLD
EL6090 - A pre-1883 Danish officer's sword, with Copenhagen retailer's etching to the blade, as well as the maker's mark of Solingen maker Kirschbaum. A light sword, with a little movement in the guard, having a narrow plated blade in high polish and an alloy guard and backstrap. With its sword knot and scabbard. A little bit of a bend in the near the tip.

SOLD
EL6089 - A 19th century Indian tulwar. Blade possibly a European import, or made in India in emulation of European blades. The hilt of traditional form, firm on the tang, but the pommel disc is a little loose.

SOLD
EL6091 - A British 1853 pattern cavalry trooper's sword. Very dark patina over the whole steel surface, as well as very light pitting. The sword is however structurally sound, with a nice blade and the patent solid hilt is all... solid. The leather grips are secure in place, with a small amount of shrinkage. I believe that I can just about see the maker's name REEVES on the spine of the blade and there is also a Birmingham proof stamp on the blade and a regimental mark on the guard. No scabbard. Fundamentally a good sword and a desirable pattern.

SOLD
EL6082 - An 1821 pattern light cavalry officer's sword, in need of cleaning. Having a large curled rear-quillon and ears to the backstrap, I would say that this is probably from early in the 1821 pattern's lifespan - the 1820s probably. It could possibly be for an NCO rather than an officer. The sword is in a somewhat sorry condition, but is basically complete. Dark patina to all parts, light pitting all over and no leather remaining on the wooden grip. Despite this, the blade is sound, with a sharpened edge, and the hilt is absolutely solid on the tang (though the ferrule moves due to the loss of leather on the grip underneath). Not a pretty sword at the moment, but certainly a good basis for a decent early example of the pattern. No scabbard.

SOLD
EL6080 - A *REPLICA* 1796 light cavalry trooper's style sabre. I purchased this based on poor photos and unfortunately it turned out to be an aged replica. But it's a very convincing and good quality replica: the heat treatment appears good, the distal taper, weight and balance are all convincing. It is only the small details that gave this away as a replica and the unusually good condition of the leather-covered grip. The ageing has been deliberately applied and you can see the remnants of a highly polished surface underneath. I am of course accepting a loss on this, but hopefully it will serve as either a restoration practice, wall hanger or perhaps a training sword for someone.

SOLD
EL6077 - A fairly respectible British 1796 pattern infantry officer's spadroon, needing just enough attention to nudge it into the restoration category. The blade, marked to J J Runkel of Solingen (who was actually based in London and importing from family in Solingen) is actually very nice, with engraving, straight and with a good tip, just needing a bit of a clean. The hilt is complete, except for the silver grip wire, which is 2/3rds missing now and the rest has unwound itself from the wooden grip. The hilt overall is loose - however, for the budding restorer there is a real treat in store: the tang nut simply unscrews. Therefore what is needed here to tighten up the hilt is the restoration of a leather washer between the blade shoulder and the double-shell guard. The wire could either be stripped from the grip, or the grip could be recovered, either using some of the original wire or replacement wire, or something else. This would be a fairly easy entry into the world of restoration and is a nice enough sword to reward a little work.

SOLD
EL6076 - A British 1796 pattern light cavalry sabre in a very sorry state! It's difficult to imagine how this poor sword ended up like this, but the blade is surprisingly clean, all things considered, as well as being marked to maker Warboys & Co. The iron guard and scabbard are very pitted and rusty, and the backstrap is completely blown out - perhaps from being hit by something. One of the most curious things is the grip, which is not the original grip, but is clearly an old grip and the iron hilt around it has evidently been this way for a long time. I can only speculate that maybe the grip was replaced during the period and then the sword was damaged in use and abandoned somewhere. In any case, this sword would either make an interesting project for someone looking for a fairly decent blade (some rust and putting toward the tip, which could be removed with some work), or simply as a relic display of something that genuinely looks like something that could have been dug up from a battlefield in France or Spain! (though I am not asserting that it was.... it's not impossible). If you want a sword to pretend is a battlefield find from Waterloo, then this is for you (but I'm not telling you to do that!).

SOLD
ELC1009 - The combat sword of Lieutenant-General Sir Henry Clement Wilkinson KCB. This is the sword he procured in 1860 when commissioning into the 16th Light Dragoons (which became the 16th Lancers). He had previously served through the Indian Mutiny with the 95th Regiment of Foot, but for personal reasons decided to transfer to the cavalry in 1860 (hence requiring a new sword). The sword comes with some cosmetic issues to the hilt, with a little bend to the guard and associated crack (still attached and solid though - see the photos), and a little wood and shagreen missing from the bottom of the grip. Both the hilt and scabbard would also benefit from some careful cleaning. However, the large 35 1/2 inch long (by 1 1/4 inch wide) blade is splendid and everything is solid. It feels great in the hand, but the main attraction of this sword is its wonderful provenance and the fact that it was carried on service in the Afghan War and the Egypt campaign. As detailed in the links below, during the Second Anglo-Afghan War (1878-1880) Wilkinson held command of the Cavalry Brigade under Major-General Phayre (this sword must have been with him and has been service sharpened) and he was Mentioned in Despatches. During the 1882 campaign in Egypt he led the Indian Cavalry Brigade, including the famous actions at Kassassin and Tel-el-Kebir (again, this is almost certainly the sword he carried), being Mentioned in Despatches twice. This is an absolutely superb sword with a first rate history.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Clement_Wilkinson

SOLD


 
EL6074 - A very good Wilkinson 1895 pattern infantry officer's sword, to a named officer and dating to 1896. This pattern of sword was made for less than two years, as the hilt was rapidly changed to the 1897 pattern. Therefore it is not a common pattern and named Wilkinson examples even less so. The officer who purchased this sword was Charles Lube Peart of the Indian Staff Corps/Indian Army, first in the 9th Madras Infantry, then 54th Sikhs and then from around 1905 in the 106th Hazara Pioneers (on the Board of Examiners in Calcutta in 1914). He initially commissioned as an officer in January 1896, when this sword was prooved by Wilkinson for him. He was promoted to Lieutenant in April 1898 and Captain in January 1905. The sword is in very good overall condition, with a little bit of nickel plating loss to the edges of the guard. The blade is bright with crisp etching, firm in the hilt. The guard is in good shape and the grip has all the shagreen and silver wire remaining. The scabbard is also in good condition, with some patches of patina. The blade has been service sharpened and I am sure there is lots of research potential for this sword. A lovely example of the type with a solid provenance.

SOLD


ELC1002 - A mid-18th century British infantry hanger, approximately of 1742 type, with straight 28.5 inch backsword style blade. The brass hilt in good condition, though missing the rear quillon and with some movement on the tang. Unusually the leather scabbard, with brass fittings, has survived and fits well. This is an unusual example within the family of mid-18th century British hangers.

SOLD
EL6072 - An excellent Royal Engineers officer's sword (1857 pattern) by Wilkinson, dated to 1865 and etched with the initials and crest of a known officer. The officer was Philip James Dardier Lindoe, who graduated and was commissioned in 1865. The blade (unsharpened) has patina, but is in generally very good condition, with deep and crisp etching, including the VR monogram, Royal Engineers emblem and the officer's crest and initials. It is firm in the hilt. The hilt is in equally good condition, with the brass guard of scroll pattern in good shape and the shagreen also good - the thinnest strand of the grip wire has gone, but that is the only flaw worth recording. Complete with a field service scabbard and Sam Browne belt frog - this may suggest that the sword continued in service with another officer after Lindoe retired in the 1870s. A really tidy example of one of the most beautiful British Army sword patterns, by the top maker of the day.

SOLD
EL6069 - A Napoleonic British flank officer's sabre, 1803 pattern, with ivory hilt and scimitar style blade by Runkel. This is a top quality sword that has suffered from service use and time. The ivory grip has some chips to the pommel end (though is quite firm on the tang) and the service sharpened blade has some pitting towards the tip and edge nicks. The presence of edge nicks in this case may actually indicate combat rather than someone messing around, as the edge is sharpened and the nicks are from a correspondingly sharp edge in the part of the blade that you might expect from combat. The blade is otherwise in structurally good condition and with some further cleaning could be very nice indeed. The symbolic motifs are rather charming, including a dragon and a Turk's head with crescent moon (almost certainly alluding to the very curved 'scimitar' style blade). The bronze guard carries the GR monogram of George III and is in fairly good shape, with nice patina - it is however rather loose, due to the loss of the leather washer (though the grip, as stated, is quite firm on the tang). All in all, a very nice sword which would benefit from some restoration, or make a very respectible example of the type as it is.

Due to the ivory grip, only for sale within the UK.


SOLD
ELC1001 - A clean and tidy example of the 1908 pattern cavalry sword, as used throughout WW1. This example with a variety of markings, showing that it was made by Sanderson Brothers and Neubold in October 1915, it was proved in Enfield and accepted for service. The blade is very clean and bright and the hilt is all tight. Light pitting to the guard and scabbard, but overall very good for this pattern. The composition grip in good condition with crisp chequering.

SOLD
ELC1004 - A fine example of the Napoleonic British light cavalry sabre (1796 pattern), by Woolley & Deakin. In cleaned condition, the blade and hilt are bright, with the original black leather grip in very good condition also. The leather washer is in place and the hilt assembly is all tight. There is a little age crack in the grip near the pommel, but this is solid and has been stablised. The blade has probably seen campaign service, having been extensively service sharpened and carrying some little nicks to the edge which from their pattern and lightness probably indicate actual use rather than someone messing around. The scabbard carries the engraved maker's name and has light patina over the whole surface. A very tidy example of one of the most desirable sword patterns.

SOLD
ELC1006 - An Edwardian Royal Army Medical Corps (RAMC) officer's sword, to a decorated Colonel who served in WW1 and WW2. The officer in question was Colonel Edward Michael O'Neill, DSO, MB. O'Neill commissioned in 1906 and was in India from 1907-1912, being promoted to Major while serving in WW1. Serving in France and Belgium, he received the Distinguished Service Order (DSO) in 1916 and was twice Mentioned in Despatches. In the inter-war years he was in India and Ceylon, as well as Britain, making full Colonel in 1934. He retired in 1938 and then re-entered active duty when WW2 began in 1939, going on to serve with the BEF again in France. He was again Mentioned in Despatches in 1940. Links to his career and medal research are linked below.
The sword itself is in very good condition overall, with a bright blade retaining most of the original atched finish, firm in the hilt. It has been service sharpened. The proof slug almost certainly marks this as the work of famous sword makers Robert Mole & Sons. The brass guard and shagreen grip are in good shape and the scabbard with Sam Browne frog and original transit/storage bag are all complete (the latter having O'Neill's name hand written on it). A top notch RAMC sword with great provenance.
Research document charting O'Neill's career
Medal research document

SOLD
ELC1005 - An officer-named Victorian infantry officer's sword, by Wilkinson, featuring a scarce professionally leather-encased guard (the guard itself probably being a steel Scinde style scroll hilt inside). The Wilkinson numbered blade dates to 1869 and was ordered by William Parry Monckton of the 37th (North Hampshire) Regiment of Foot, with his initials and crest etched on one side. The hilt (originally a brass gothic pattern) was replaced later on, as the backstrap is of the post-1895 straight fully-chequered type. The very skillfully leather-encased guard is highly unusual and must have been a special order - the steel guard inside seems to be of the scroll pattern, as chosen by some officers serving in India and emulated in brass by the Royal Engineers in 1857 and later by Highland regiment Field Officers. Monckton himself was born in 1846 in Allahabad and when he commissioned into the 37th, they were stationed in Bengal, India. Monckton served a full career with the Hampshire Regiment, reaching Lieutenant-Colonel in 1892 and being recorded in 1896 as on retired pay. This raises the question of who re-hilted the sword after 1895 - it is very likely that W. P. Monckton passed his sword on to a younger serving officer, perhaps a family member. The condition of the sword is excellent, with a bright blade, having crisp etching and firm in the hilt. The hilt is also very good and the leather is all tight with intact stitching. The sword is also complete with matching field service sword knot and field service scabbard. The sale also includes a scan from the Wilkinson proof book for this blade.

SOLD
EL6065 - An 1895 pattern infantry officer's sword (dating to 1895-96), with an Indian service style scabbard. The proof slug suggests that this was probably the work of Edward Thurkle and the hilt features a copper-alloy backstrap and ferrule, which may possibly indicate that this was initially fitted with a gothic style hilt, before then receiving the 1895 pattern steel guard. Then again, the backstrap is in the 1895 style, so the hilt and blade may all be contemporaneous.  The steel parts all have matching grey patina, though the etching of the blade is nice and clear. Everything is tight in the assembly and all the shagreen and grip wire is present and tight. The scabbard leather is flaking and overall the sword could benefit from some gentle restoration.

SOLD
EL6067 - A lovely quality big late-Victorian light cavalry officer's sword (blade 35 inches) retailed by top outfitter Hawkes and almost certainly supplied to them by Wilkinson. Apart from the crown proof slug (which Wilkinson used on trade swords), the etching seems like it could only be Wilkinson's characteristic frost and mirror deeply etched style. The blade is in very good condition, with most of the original polish and frost etching - it would benefit from some gentle soft buffing to really bring it up to top standard. The guard and backstrap have a pleasing smooth dark patina (perhaps browned originally) with nice thick guard bars and everything rock solid. The shagreen and grip wire is perfect considering the age. The sword dates almost certainly to the 1880s or early 1890s. In its field service scabbard. A really pleasing sword in the hand.

SOLD
EL6070 - A mid-Victorian Rifle Volunteers officer's sword, with silver shield to the pommel. A fairly standard example of the pattern (1827 Rifles hilt with 1845 blade), in decent condition, but with the unusual feature of the officer's initials and crest (now very rubbed) in a silver shield applied to the pommel base. The sword retailed by Browne of London, from an unknown maker (probably Solingen), the blade is fairly clean with clear etching. The guard and backstrap with matching light patina and quite clean - everything tight and secure, without movement (though there is a little bit of a rattle in the backstrap). The leather washer is still present, though the sword lacks a scabbard unfortunately. The shagreen grip is in good condition and the grip wire is all present, though a couple of strands are a little loose.

SOLD
EL6071 - An Edward VII period Wilkinson cavalry officer's sword, 1896 pattern, numbered for 1902 and unresearched. This sword has some cosmetic issues, namely the russet surface of the guard and backstrap and the scabbard having been repaired, but it is a numbered Wilkinson and is structurally sound. The blade is in fairly good condition, with clear etching, absolutely rock solid in the hilt. The whole hilt assembly is tight and with no movement. The guard and backstrap have obviously been allowed to attract surface rust at some point and this has been superficially cleaned off, leaving the russet surface you see now. This could certainly be cleaned further, even to a bare steel finish, with some work. The shagreen grip is very good and all the silver grip wire is present and tight. The field service scabbard is present, but it was obviously broken, or fell apart, at some time and has been patched back together. Essentially therefore this is a good sword, by Wilkinson with research potential, but probably requires some work to bring it up to standard. Priced accordingly.

SOLD
EL6064 - An exceptional presentation 1857 pattern Royal Engineer's officer's sword, with dated dedication to the officer, by Wilkinson. The dedication etched on the blade reads, "Presented to gentleman cadet Richard H B Beaumont on obtaining his commission from the Royal Military Academy June 1858, for his exemplary conduct while at the institution". The blade is bright and clean, with clear etching and is firm in the hilt. It is numbered 9268 (for manufacture in 1858) - this pattern had only existed for a few months when this example was made. The brass hilt is all in good shape and without movement, having traces of gilding remaining in the recesses. The grip is very good, with the shagreen 99% complete, with just a little lifting at the pommel end (though secure). The grip wire is all complete and tight. It is housed in a steel scabbard, but it is somewhat stiff to draw - either this is a replacement scabbard or a slight dent has made it that way. A rare chance to get hold of a presentation version of one of the most sought after British Army sword patterns, an early example, in great condition and by the top maker of the day.

SOLD
EL6066 - An Artillery Volunteers officer's sword which has had the hilt and scabbard silver plated, with the blade nickel plated. There is an officer's name on the blade, but I cannot quite read it through the later plating. After the blade was plated, someone has service sharpened this sword (see photos), so that the bare steel appears darker in the foible of the blade (with the copper coating under the plating also appearing) and the edges, both front and back, are quite sharp still. The fact that this is a named artillery volunteers officer's sword, but it has been service sharpened, suggests that either the officer saw active service themselves, or they passed on the sword to someone who did see active service. The sword, other than the patina on the bare steel of the service sharpening, is in lovely condition and the silver plating has been polished for these photos and is in good condition. The shagreen and grip wire are also complete and in good condition. The hilt is all tight on the tang and the proof slug looks like Pillin's. Arguably the service sharpening on a volunteers sword makes this even more interesting and it may be possible to decypher the officer's name and unlock its history.

SOLD
EL6068 - An 1896 pattern cavalry officer's sword from George V's reign. The 35 inch blade with Wilkinson's trade proof slug (sold by a retailer rather than Wilkinson directly), the blade being bright with only minor blemishes and the etching clear. The honeysuckle pattern guard bright and the whole hilt completely tight on the tang. The chequered backstrap and pommel in nice condition and the shagreen grip very good. A couple of the thinnest strands missing from the silver grip wire, but otherwise good. Together with the field service scabbard and an unusual belt loop which seems to have age matching that of the scabbard and sword, suggesting this having been worn slightly differently to the normal Sam Browne arrangement.

SOLD
EL6003 - A rare variant of the Napoleonic era British infantry officer's spadroon (1796 pattern), featuring a double-edged blade with part flattened-diamond and part hexagonal section blade. The blade engraved with the royal coat of arms and motto, as well as the pledge "For My Country and King" to both sides. Hilt of regulation form, but high quality manufacture, with gilt brass guard and pommel (much gilt remaining) and a silver wire-bound grip which has a flattened front and back, better suited to swordsmanship than the normal oval-section grips. Hilt construction all fairly tight. No scabbard.

SOLD
EL6062 - A mid-Victorian light cavalry officer's sword by Wilkinson, with crest and initials to named officer. Number 13041 (for April 1864) the officer in question was Hugh Berkeley Griffiths Esq, of the 4th Queen's Own Hussars and an electronic copy of the Wilkinson proof record is included in the sale. The blade recorded as a 'Medium light cavalry', meaning that is is a little lighter than the normal regulation, at 34 1/2 inches by 1 1/8 inches. As a result this feels great in the hand and in my experience a lot of officers after the 1860s were ordering this slightly lighter weight blade (which is still bigger than an infantry officer's sword). The blade has beautiful crisp etching and the initials and crest are very clear. It is solid in the hilt and everything is tight. The guard and scabbard are dark with patina, but in sound condition. The shagreen has a little wear from use, but is secure and 95% complete. The silver grip wire is all present. A very nice sword of the top quality of the day, which also feels lovely in the hand.

SOLD
EL6063 - A Victorian Surrey Artillery Volunteers officer's sword, retailed by W. Roberts & Co of London. In basically sound condition, with everything tight. The blade quite bright with light patina and crisp etching. The guard, backstrap and scabbard have been deliverately painted in a vaguely khaki colour - this was done for some Boer War and WW1 swords, but given that this is a Surrey Artillery Sword and it has not been service sharpened, it is anyone's guess as to why it was carefully painted. The paint could be stripped off with paint remover. The shagreen has some loss at the pommel end and the copper grip wire is in good condition.

SOLD
EL6060 - An early Victorian infantry officer's sword, 1822 pattern, with pipeback blade and brass scabbard. Dating to 1837-1845, this example is in good condition, with a bright blade (etching faint though), bright brass scabbard and hilt. The blade has been service sharpened. The shagreen and grip wire are in good condition, though due to compression of the leather washer, the guard is now a bit loose.

SOLD
EL6059 - A mid-Victorian Royal Navy officer's sword with non-regulation claymore/broadsword style blade. Marked to outfitter R German of Devonport. The blade with detailed and good quality etching. Some light pitting towards the tip and a light grey patina overall, but the etching is crisp and the blade is generally quite bright. Regulation folding gilt brass guard and lion-head pommel. White shagreen and grip wire in good condition. The blade is firm in the hilt. No scabbard.

SOLD
EL6058 - A Victorian Rifles officer's sword, made by Thurkle. Probably dating to the 1870s or 1880s, this Rifles officer's sword carried Thurkle's proof slug and is in good tidy condition, though with the blade etching rather faint. The blade is quite bright and has been service sharpened, with some very minor edge dings. The guard and backstrap are bright and in good condition, with all the shagreen and most of the silver grip wire present. The hilt is tight on the tang. A nice nimble sword. No scabbard.

SOLD
EL6057 - A rare mid-Victorian Royal Artillery gunner's short sword. The blade is bright condition with much original mirror polish and frost etching, the whole edge bevel service sharpened to a fine edge. Some small nicks to the cutting edge. The hilt and scabbard with matching dark patina and pitting. The shagreen and grip wire in good condition. Housed in its original steel scabbard with frog button. Roughly Crimean War era - a rare piece.

SOLD
EL6025 - An 1899 pattern cavalry sword, with unusual scabbard and service sharpened. This sword is in good condition and the hilt and scabbard have been deliberately browned for active service (probably Boer War). The sword was made at Enfield in 1901 and has various relevant markings. The scabbard is unusual, having two rings on the same side, rather than the usual opposite/parallel rings for saddle mounting. This is similar to the 1889 pattern infantry sergeant's sword, though this scabbard fits this blade perfectly and they obviously belong together - it may indicate mounted infantry rather than cavalry use. The blade is in really good condition, with a well service sharpened edge and point.

SOLD
EL6061 - A 19th century Indian tulwar, with lenticular un-fullered blade and Northern Indian (probably Pubjab) style hilt, with knucklebow.

SOLD
EL6056 - An Italian M1871 cavalry sword, featuring the characteristic pipe-backed blade and thumb recess which marked out this pattern from previous Italian cavalry swords and set the model for later Italian types. Everything is tight, the sword sheathes well in the matching steel scabbard and the steel is all in nice condition with some patina and only small areas of light pitting in places. There are traces of plating to the backstrap and pommel. Various numbers and markings showing to blade and hilt. The wooden grip has a tiny split near the pommel, but this seems stable. An iconic sword design of the late-19th century which Sir Richard Francis Burton considers in his famous 1876 manual on swordsmanship.

SOLD
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